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Rare Maps of Toronto

Just wondering how this "non-partisan" Foundation stacks-up, considering their Anti-tobacco stance:

"Martha J. Shuttleworth, a philanthropist, was born in London, Ontario, and graduated from Glendon College, York University, in 1972.
Throughout the 1980's, she was a significant funder of Canada's anti-tobacco industry movement.
Martha is President of the Foundation, an organization she founded in 1996."

http://www.neptis.org/about

Also:

Delegate Interview
Marcy Burchfield
Director of Research Programming and Communication, The Neptis Foundation

"We have had the fortune to work with, mainly through funding, a group of diverse stakeholders in British Columbia who
are developing techniques to engage communities in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in BC by
introducing community energy initiatives. This group uses cutting-edge research and innovative
tools of engagement to explain the relationship between urban form and energy use and changes
that can be make at the neighbourhood scale to reduce GHGs.
British Columbia has set aggressive legislated targets for greenhouse gas reduction.
To achieve its targets citizens must understand how they can be a part of the solution.
This group is doing an amazing job of engaging a diverse range of citizens."

http://cityminded.org/delegate/marcy-burchfield



Regards,
J T
 
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Just wondering how this "non-partisan" Foundation stacks-up, considering their Anti-tobacco stance:

"Martha J. Shuttleworth, a philanthropist, was born in London, Ontario, and graduated from Glendon College, York University, in 1972.
Throughout the 1980's, she was a significant funder of Canada's anti-tobacco industry movement.
Martha is President of the Foundation, an organization she founded in 1996."

http://www.neptis.org/about

Also:

Delegate Interview
Marcy Burchfield
Director of Research Programming and Communication, The Neptis Foundation

"We have had the fortune to work with, mainly through funding, a group of diverse stakeholders in British Columbia who
are developing techniques to engage communities in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in BC by
introducing community energy initiatives. This group uses cutting-edge research and innovative
tools of engagement to explain the relationship between urban form and energy use and changes
that can be make at the neighbourhood scale to reduce GHGs.
British Columbia has set aggressive legislated targets for greenhouse gas reduction.
To achieve its targets citizens must understand how they can be a part of the solution.
This group is doing an amazing job of engaging a diverse range of citizens."

http://cityminded.org/delegate/marcy-burchfield


Regards,
J T

JT: Am I missing something?
 
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Not at all:

http://levyrapidtransit.ca/5-1-forty-years-of-schemes-and-dreams-finally-spawn-action/#.U4eRAE1OXsR

Thence to "Role of Neptis"

> Note from The Neptis Foundation.

(The mud will start to clear . . . )

Also reread my original two links for added clarity re The Neptis Foundation.


Regards,
J T

They may not be non-partisan/impartial, but is anyone these days actually in favour of tobacco, let alone greenhouse gases? And if so, with what motivation?
 
I don't drink Kool-Aid; I drink Coca-Cola.

J T
-30-
 
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The change from Ontario Street would have been inevitable as the city grew westward, but the reason for the change from Muter is a bit more obscure. Not a lot of info on the wwweb, but Lt. Col. Robert Muter of Niagara married Anne Knowles Cameron of Toronto (sister of John Hillyard Cameron) on March 6, 1849. He purchased land in the Crookshank Estate on July 1, 1853, and it appears he built a large brick house on the west side of Markham Street just south of Dundas (then Arthur), living there until his death circa 1874. The street appears as “Muter†in the 1888 directory, and as “Palmerston†in the 1889. Don’t know why it was changed, but yes, Palmerston sounds much better. :)

The name change was to honour Lord Palmerston, PM of the UK, although quite why it was done a relatively long time after his death (1865) is a bit of a mystery. His legacy is largely in foreign affairs and there are quite a few places named after him on different continents, including a small town in Ontario, another in Australia and two in New Zealand (one on each island).
 
From a City of Toronto planning document from 1959 titled "The Changing City", showing how Toronto would look in 1980:

 

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