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Parking - Catch All

Probably a good thing, but may just delay the whole idea of extending those Lansdowne bike lanes even more.

That is an issue.

But I think that if we're going to shift modal share further, we must stop providing any parking for free or below market rates, with some possible allowance for medical needs.

I would like to see a more coordinated, thoughtful effort by the City that would:

1) Phase-in full market rates for all permit parking, roughly $200 per month, instead of ~ $17-$74 currently.
2) Charge for parking (where currently permitted), on all side streets, permit holders exempt (don't pay twice); and establish a minimum of $2 per hour or market-rate, the higher of the two.
Begin this in the downtown zone, immediately (Bathurst to the Don, Lake to Davenport); roll-out City-wide over 10 years.
3) Begin to eliminate on-street parking on major roads, starting with streetcar routes downtown. Do I street per year to start, then accelerate.
4) As parking spaces become more scarce, raise the price to reflect the limited supply.
5) Tax 'free' commercial parking in the City at a rate of not less than $3 per space per day. Also apply to any parking lot where the minimum charge is below $2 or the daily maximum under $3

Direct the net revenues from the above to be spent entirely on active transportation projects such as sidewalk installation, sidewalk widening, streetscape improvement, slip-lane removal, and cycle tracks.

With time, hopefully, driving modal share would decline materially, and that would make it more feasible to deliver more cycle tracks.
 
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Ok......potentially big news, in a report to next week's Infrastructure and Environment Ctte staff are recommending developing a holistic parking strategy for the City.

Report here: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ie/bgrd/backgroundfile-222862.pdf

Nothing is achieved by approving the budgeted study. However, the tone suggests some new policies many here will like (myself included); and suggests a need for many of us to be engaged when any public process comes forward later this year.

There is lots of verbiage in this report that does not lend itself to being transcribed or copied here.

Some of it continues to express the value of provided parking (which I don't totally disagree with); what's key here is that virtually everything is on the table; and the thrust of any changes.

On the table:

Permit parking (form, price etc.)
Carsharing
Visitor Parking standards
Green P lots
Front Yard Parking pads
Curb-side parking on streets.

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Here's the encouraging tone:

Ugh at the use of 'world-class'.........but otherwise:

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Summation (my pov):

The City is definitely putting reallocation of curbside space on the table with an eye to wider sidewalks, cycle tracks and patio space. The question is going to be one of degree.

A strong emphasis on the need for high-turnover/short-stay parking for businesses suggests substantial increases in parking rates are on the table; I strongly suspect these may be
time variable according to demand, something that has been tested elsewhere already.

I think we will see more reserved spaces for carsharing, likely w/EV charging available and possibly at lower cost than current rates.

Permit parking will stay, but will definitely get some form of simplification, I'm hopeful that increase rates will also be part of the conversation.

Front Yard pads will get uniform rules, my hope being that these will further limit new pads and even incentivize removal of existing ones.

Finally, very clear that Green P assets will be monetized. Parking lot redevelopment is coming, at scale. The only questions will be will be how much is profit-focused vs
affordable housing or other city-building initiatives like parks.
 
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Your last couple of posts are very interesting and I am very supportive, and a car driver as well. I do not think cars are going to disappear from the landscape and some accommodations re parking need to be made for them - either private, on street or parking structures. However, not at the expense of other forms of transit - walking, cycling or street car/bus. In fact none of 'my' streetscapes for arterial and major commuter roads contain on street parking. How we deal with commercial loading/unloading is an important question that needs to be accommodated in a workable fashion.

One other item I would add is from my experience here on the Island of Montreal. No right hand turns on red lights - no exceptions. My observation would be that this rule calms the entire experience of vehicle, cyclist, pedestrian at an intersection. No rolling right hand turns, No cutting off pedestrians as vehicles try and make those turns, safety and access is enhanced for all other users. And yes, it is a bit slower for the driver, but too bad, get over it.

Lets see if the increasing intensification of the urban areas of Toronto begin to manifest itself in political direction to enhance transit priority in other areas i.e. at all stop lights.
 
A mostly confidential report to next week's meeting of the Toronto Parking Authority outlines plans for a new direction for the TPA.

Most of the details are only hinted at; but its clear there will be a greater drive to monetize parking and to drop spaces where the value of the land is greater in $ or city-building than what it brings back through Green P.

Report here: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/pa/bgrd/backgroundfile-226074.pdf

From said report:

1652990497579.png
 
More on-street parking converting from free to paid! This time up in North York, where several street segments between the ring road and Yonge will change to pay and display for 46 spaces.

This is being done in anticipation of narrowing Yonge to 2 lanes each way + cycle tracks at which point all on-street parking on Yonge will be removed.

This from a report to the next meeting of NYCC:


The affected roads are:

1655391705953.png

1655391720214.png
 
A slew of free parking is set to shift to pay and display in the old City of Toronto as the result of several reports to the next meeting of TEYCC:


This first report shifts 150 spaces from free to paid:

1655556817958.png

1655556840140.png


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This report shifts 60 spaces from free to paid:

1655556929622.png

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This report gives us 34 spaces shifting from free to paid:

1655557067653.png


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This report gives us 10 spaces shifting from free to paid:

1655557165565.png

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This report gives us 20 spaces shifting from free to paid:

1655557282948.png


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Finally, we have this report:


Which will shift 52 spaces on O'Connor Drive (east of St. Clair) from free to paid.

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All-in-All............six reports, that together will shift 326 parking spaces from free to paid! 😀

Outstanding! This is the sort of shift I've been lobbying for, for years.

We've seen hints of this the last year or two, but this is on another scale!

More of same, please!
 
A slew of free parking is set to shift to pay and display in the old City of Toronto as the result of several reports to the next meeting of TEYCC:


This first report shifts 150 spaces from free to paid:

View attachment 408317
View attachment 408318

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This report shifts 60 spaces from free to paid:

View attachment 408319
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This report gives us 34 spaces shifting from free to paid:

View attachment 408320

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This report gives us 10 spaces shifting from free to paid:

View attachment 408321
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This report gives us 20 spaces shifting from free to paid:

View attachment 408322

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Finally, we have this report:


Which will shift 52 spaces on O'Connor Drive (east of St. Clair) from free to paid.

***

All-in-All............six reports, that together will shift 326 parking spaces from free to paid! 😀

Outstanding! This is the sort of shift I've been lobbying for, for years.

We've seen hints of this the last year or two, but this is on another scale!

More of same, please!

Thanks for helping to influence and shift municipal policy in a progressive direction!
 
What do you suggest are the most effective ways to get engaged with the process?

The process for any official consultation isn't yet public, so we'll have to wait on that...........

I may inquire further to see if we can get some anticipated times/dates...

I would suggest in the interim that if one has opinions on this, look to email the councillors (who are running again) who sit on the TPA board) and the applicable staff.

But mostly, I expect some sort of public consultation.

I'll see if I can get UT some details. (no guarantees)
 
At the TPA Board Mtg last week, the 2023 Operating Plan Presentation was on the agenda:


From the above:

1671459915866.png


1671460016668.png


What's interesting in the above is that if offers hints at the time of some other projects we are following here at UT.

1671460140969.png


1671460196306.png


^^^^ Ahem, 700 stations in market is a Past Accomplishment? I don't think so, not there yet! Fibbing!

1671460337390.png


Note above the push to begin rezoning Green P lots and a new on-road parking strategy. Elsewhere in the plan, its noted that the strategy may (ahem will) curtail on-street, curbside parking.
 
Happy to see more chargers: https://globalnews.ca/video/9361675...ric-charging-stations-at-green-p-parking-lots
That said the on street ones are incredibly ugly compared to others I've seen. I also really think we need to move faster on this. EV's are getting close to 10% of new sales and I think we will see a steep increase as production issues diminish and more and more people see a lot of EV's out and about / have friends and family with one: https://electricautonomy.ca/2022/11/04/canadas-zev-registrations-q3/
 
Happy to see more chargers: https://globalnews.ca/video/9361675...ric-charging-stations-at-green-p-parking-lots
That said the on street ones are incredibly ugly compared to others I've seen. I also really think we need to move faster on this. EV's are getting close to 10% of new sales and I think we will see a steep increase as production issues diminish and more and more people see a lot of EV's out and about / have friends and family with one: https://electricautonomy.ca/2022/11/04/canadas-zev-registrations-q3/

A matter yet to be addressed, so far as I can discern is private, multi-res, landlord-provided parking. I'm not even aware of incentives for EV chargers, never mind mandates. Right now, in the complex where I rent, none of the outside surface parking have chargers. In truth, none really have it at all, but a limited number of spaces have plugs available to them which they could use for an old-school slow-charge, in theory. Chicken-and Egg issue, of course, no one in the complex yet owns an EV; but then of course, there's nowhere (proper) to charge one.

Edit to add:

I'd love to see a voluntary/incentive package for the introduction of chargers in multi-res lots bundled with a program to green surface parking of this type (where its not going to be built on), to achieve urban-heat island reduction through canopy/shade. Since running the requisite wiring would generally involve the need to rip up the pavement for a portion of the lot anyway, why not two birds with one stone?

The incentive should go away after 5-7 years replaced by a mandatory standard, providing incentive for more rapid change.
 
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