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Ontarians heading east?

p_xavier

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^ While there a lot of variables (serviced, zoning, location, etc.), a quick scan of Fredericton listing seems to suggest a 'typical vacant lot' goes for in the area of $50-60K. I imagine a vacant residential building lot in Toronto, should one exist, might be a tad more.

Again, a lot of variables, but the Interweb suggests that it costs about $150/sf to build a new house in NB (stock plans), so a 'typical' 2000sf house could be put on a 'typical' lot for about $300K. Of course, per any bubble that is going on down there, and pre the current spike in building material costs.
That's about right. Where I live right now (Eastern Ontario) is basically the same as NB (I'm from there). It's really cheap still and I don't get why more people don't move here, it's so close to Montréal and Ottawa (45 minutes train commute). So in the end, you don't have to move to another province get good house prices, you just need to look more.
 

lenaitch

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My response is to lay down the reality of winter. Rural winter out east, you're trapped.

Trapped, in the sense of no return. If you sell up and take your wad to NS and buy a cheaper house, you don't have the money to return.

No, I get that. I'd be in the same boat - I couldn't afford to return to the GTA. I was responding in the context it was made.
 

afransen

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That's about right. Where I live right now (Eastern Ontario) is basically the same as NB (I'm from there). It's really cheap still and I don't get why more people don't move here, it's so close to Montréal and Ottawa (45 minutes train commute). So in the end, you don't have to move to another province get good house prices, you just need to look more.
Cornwall area? It is indeed very cheap. It's just seen as an undesirable area. Far from airports. I have to travel to Cornwall for work from time to time, and it is actually one of the sites in Canada that takes me the longest to travel to (similar to Calgary), whether I fly or drive. Maybe improving rail connections would help that area become more desirable place for employment. I always kind of wondered why Kingston hasn't gained more prominence, as well.
 

afransen

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Even Windsor is shockingly cheap. I have a friend that moved their for work (accounting) and she bought a detached house with a garage for a bit over $100k, around 10 years ago.
 

p_xavier

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Cornwall area? It is indeed very cheap. It's just seen as an undesirable area. Far from airports. I have to travel to Cornwall for work from time to time, and it is actually one of the sites in Canada that takes me the longest to travel to (similar to Calgary), whether I fly or drive. Maybe improving rail connections would help that area become more desirable place for employment. I always kind of wondered why Kingston hasn't gained more prominence, as well.
No, North Glengarry, it's 30 minutes train ride to YUL. Takes about the same time than DT MTL.
 

Admiral Beez

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44 North

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Not sure what you mean by 'trapped', but it depends on where they are. A buddy moved to the Annapolis Valley NS a few years ago. He's used his snowblower 2-3 times each winter. A lot of the west coast - lower mainland - certainly has the climate if the rain doesn't get you down, but you're not moving there for cost of living relief.

Well some of the people I'm referring to are fairly urban. Snow tires may be a foreign concept, as is driving in the snow, let alone things like snow blowers (and the maintenance of such a device).

Funnily, the wife and I have been talking about retiring in part to the UK. I love old trains and seaside living and north Yorkshire has both and relatively affordable homes and rentals.

It's been on my mind as a future possibility as well. Could get my dual passport sorted out. Though wonder if I'd spend my days hoping for a major crime so I could play whodunnit. lol, I've followed too much detective fiction and rural UK is basically the quintessential setting.

That being said if affordable living with rural aspects is what people want check out all the towns east of Peterborough. Lots of decaying towns with somewhat affordable homes. You're straddling the northern fringe of farming country, but the southern edge of shield country. It's the land between.
 

Jonny5

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With the Newfoundland collapse report coming out last week, I wonder if more people will hesitate on this kind of move. Are wealthy retirees, or soon-to-be retirees, moving to what is already a high tax jurisdiction prepared for even higher taxes to come as they perpetuate the further greying of their escape destination? New Brunswick isn't far behind Newfoundland, and accepting in large numbers of people who have high health care costs yet contribute little marginal tax income in their lifetimes to the province will be something. Of course, they could vote in some Conservative denialists for a while, like Alberta, and perpetuate the dream, but the party can and probably will suddenly stop in the Maritimes just like it has now in Newfoundland which is staring at the iceberg of bankruptcy directly ahead with no way out but a massive reorganistion of everything in the province, including mass privatisation, mass government layoffs, and raising taxes significantly. I wonder how the Move East Brigade will feel in ten years about living in a province with a 20% HST?
 
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lenaitch

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Well some of the people I'm referring to are fairly urban. Snow tires may be a foreign concept, as is driving in the snow, let alone things like snow blowers (and the maintenance of such a device).

Fair point, which speaks to the need for thought and research before making a lifestyle change; much like folks must do when moving from rural to urban. Some embrace the change, others not so much, and some spent their energy trying to 'urbanize the rural'.
With the Newfoundland collapse report coming out last week, I wonder if more people will hesitate on this kind of move. Are wealthy retirees, or soon-to-be retirees, moving to what is already a high tax jurisdiction prepared for even higher taxes to come as they perpetuate the further greying of their escape destination? New Brunswick isn't far behind Newfoundland, and accepting in large numbers of people who have high health care costs yet contribute little marginal tax income in their lifetimes to the province will be something. Of course, they could vote in some Conservative denialists for a while, like Alberta, and perpetuate the dream, but the party can and probably will suddenly stop in the Maritimes just like it has now in Newfoundland which is staring at the iceberg of bankruptcy directly ahead with no way out but a massive reorganistion of everything in the province, including mass privatisation, mass government layoffs, and raising taxes significantly. I wonder how the Move East Brigade will feel in ten years about living in a province with a 20% HST?

If you can walk away with six figures in your jeans and have decent retirement income, the higher provincial income and consumption taxes might be seen as a win, but you are right that greying can have an impact on provincial economies.
 

Admiral Beez

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. Though wonder if I'd spend my days hoping for a major crime so I could play whodunnit. lol, I've followed too much detective fiction and rural UK is basically the quintessential setting.
Me too. Though after a season of several British detective shows on Netflix one has to wonder why the murder rate is so high in these rural towns.
 

Jonny5

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Me too. Though after a season of several British detective shows on Netflix one has to wonder why the murder rate is so high in these rural towns.
JessicaFletcher_arrested_272.jpg
 

afransen

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Same with rural Montana in 'Longmire'. Grizzly, elaborate crimes every week in a town with a sheriff and a couple deputies. These shows require some suspension of disbelief.
 

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