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Montréal Transit Developments

Northern Light

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While the subway stations may lack publicly-accessible bathrooms, both of those particular bus terminals do feature them.

Which I guess brings up a question: do both sides of the transfer need to have a bathroom, or only one? The assumption being that those making a transfer there will get the opportunity to pass by at least one set of bathrooms this way.

Dan
If the washrooms on the other side of a connection, should they be shown on TTC maps?

In many cases the connection is fluid, in some, like York Mills, its a tad roundabout.
 

SFO-YYZ

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The Réseau Express Métropolitain: the multi-billion dollar light rail project Montreal never asked for


A hot take on REM and what it means for the city.

The real estate development side is definitely something to watch.
Sensationalism hardly qualifies as journalism. All of the points of the article have been widely publicized in public consultations and debated since 2016. But sure, it's a "hot take".
 

nephersir7

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The STM's preliminary timeline for the deployment of platform screen doors on the Orange Line, as shared by user @cprail on mtlurb.

The contract will be awarded next year and the prototype will be installed in late 2021 and undergo testing throughout 2022.

Afterwards, it will take 4 full years (2023-2026) to complete installation on the 30 other stations.
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SFO-YYZ

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The STM's preliminary timeline for the deployment of platform screen doors on the Orange Line, as shared by user @cprail on mtlurb.

The contract will be awarded next year and the prototype will be installed in late 2021 and undergo testing throughout 2022.

Afterwards, it will take 4 full years (2023-2026) to complete installation on the 30 other stations.
View attachment 215216
I assume this won't be fully enclosed doors (like what we see in many Asian metros), but more shoulder-height glass barriers (which is more suitable for STM stations given the varying ceiling heights between stations). Still good to see this making progress, and prototyping at an actual station is a nice way to gradually introduce the concept to the public.
 

p_xavier

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I assume this won't be fully enclosed doors (like what we see in many Asian metros), but more shoulder-height glass barriers (which is more suitable for STM stations given the varying ceiling heights between stations). Still good to see this making progress, and prototyping at an actual station is a nice way to gradually introduce the concept to the public.
More than 2m so more akin to Asian metros than not. There are talks about the blue line getting them, but it's still under study. The 2026 date is to be ready for the blue line extension.
 

asher__jo

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The Réseau Express Métropolitain: the multi-billion dollar light rail project Montreal never asked for


A hot take on REM and what it means for the city.

The real estate development side is definitely something to watch.
I'm of two minds: it's a disaster having transit built and planned by someone other than the the main transit planning/management agency OR it's the most brilliant thing ever (in the vein of how competing private companies were responsible for the massive scale of the NY subway).
 

Bureaucromancer

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in the vein of how competing private companies were responsible for the massive scale of the NY subway
That's not really how it happened... Yes, there were ultimately two companies involved, but the dual contracts were very much government planned and funded. With, largely, the explicit goal of replacing the privately built elevated lines.

Never mind that it's the IND system that really gives the subway anything like the scale it has now, or that 2nd Ave was the first major opening since the IND.

That said, I'm with you on the general sentiment. As a matter of principle everything about the REM process seems a bad idea, but otoh if (quasi) private assumption of the planning can get things done as fast as they were in Montreal... The issues it will probably cause seem far prefereable to dealing with the outcomes of not doing anything meaningful for decades at a time.
 

p_xavier

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That's not really how it happened... Yes, there were ultimately two companies involved, but the dual contracts were very much government planned and funded. With, largely, the explicit goal of replacing the privately built elevated lines.

Never mind that it's the IND system that really gives the subway anything like the scale it has now, or that 2nd Ave was the first major opening since the IND.

That said, I'm with you on the general sentiment. As a matter of principle everything about the REM process seems a bad idea, but otoh if (quasi) private assumption of the planning can get things done as fast as they were in Montreal... The issues it will probably cause seem far prefereable to dealing with the outcomes of not doing anything meaningful for decades at a time.
I disagree completely. The CDPQi had to present a project that would be accepted by the officials, plus the CDPQi presented a project that cost less per user per km to build/maintan/finance/operate than what it cost the exo trains on average to operate or on par with operating costs of buses. Many transit experts in Montréal are actually urbanists that wanted streetcars because it looks good (akin to Surrey), and they think it costs less because there's less infrastcture needed.

The best thing for the city was to actually get the public servants and politics out of its planning. So what was done was to optimise everything to get the best cost/ratio for a system and get the speed of the system needed to be attractive. The last thing is what is often missing from most LRT projects: speed (see the awful US numbers). Ultimately, it's speed and frequency that gets people on board, not a cute little train.

Sure there were issues but if that would be a publicly managed project, the REM would arrive in 20 years. Just look at the Pie-IX BRT with politician want to have its say in the planning process. That's when nothing good comes out of it or you get an overengineered bloated mess.

Just another proof of how efficient it's going : The CDPQi was asked to study the East-Island line and they should come back next year with a proposal that will go for a tender, and hopefullly construction to start in 2021. It takes 8 months just to buy a pencil and do the paperwork in the public sector... And the governments, instead of cutting the red tape, well they just gave the studies to an organisation that doesn't have that kind of red tape.
 
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