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General cycling issues (Is Toronto bike friendly?)

W. K. Lis

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That I agree with. We should have a different stop sign that applies to bicycles as well as cars, if only to keep them safe when it's not a four way stop. Otherwise one way street signs and stop signs shouldn't apply to bikes. But since they do, cyclists like myself should be stopping at them.
Replace the 4-way stops with a raised intersection with yield (sharks teeth). Cyclists and motorists are then forced to slow down.
2raisedIntersect.jpg
From link.
 

felix123

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They kept the bikes (and pedestrians) off of the sidewalks during their High Park blitz by parking their own cars on it.
There are always these dumb pickup truck drivers who park on the sidewalk around me (King West) as their default parking method. That, or thy park 2 wheels on the sidewalk, 2 on the bike lane.
 

robmausser

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Furthermore, something they alluded to but I would love to see the actual data on; when a car does a rolling stop at a stop sign, they are typically going just as fast as a bike that doesnt even slow down for one! It only feels slower because the car was going 60 km/h, and had to slow to 15 km/h to roll at the stop sign. Meanwhile a cyclist is biking at roughly 20 km/h and to slow to that same rolling speed would be almost imperceptible. So it seems like bikes are gliding through stop signs, and cars slowing down, when they are rolling through at the same speed.

Our human perceptions of speed are actually more tied to acceleration and deceleration.
 

evandyk

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Furthermore, something they alluded to but I would love to see the actual data on; when a car does a rolling stop at a stop sign, they are typically going just as fast as a bike that doesnt even slow down for one! It only feels slower because the car was going 60 km/h, and had to slow to 15 km/h to roll at the stop sign. Meanwhile a cyclist is biking at roughly 20 km/h and to slow to that same rolling speed would be almost imperceptible. So it seems like bikes are gliding through stop signs, and cars slowing down, when they are rolling through at the same speed.

Our human perceptions of speed are actually more tied to acceleration and deceleration.
Not only that, but a bike can go from 15 to 0 pretty much on a dime, while a car most definitely cannot.

I almost got rolled through by a large pickup truck this morning at King and Bay, along with 5 or 6 other pedestrians. The driver saw us, he just didn't care.
 

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