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General cycling issues (Is Toronto bike friendly?)

That shouldn't be a priority for the city. Kids 14 and under are allowed to bike on sidewalks. It makes a lot more sense IMO to not have an awkward gap between Dundas, Woodbine and the Waterfront Trail.



Can you clarify this? Kingston and Gerrard are already connected to Woodbine, neither of those have bike lanes, and Corley Avenue doesn't intersect either of them. Eastwood Avenue is 4 km east of Woodbine.

Are you trying be difficult, or are you just ignorant of the local geography?

Relying on sidewalks to allow kids to bike isn't a strategy. And cyclists aren't limited to cycling on bike lanes; contraflow lanes legalize shortcuts on quieter streets that were made one-way to discourage through motor traffic. Eastwood Road (ok, not Eastwood Avenue) connects to Gerrard in the west and Corley in the east and intersects Woodbine.
 
Before the 401, one could bicycle from Avenue Road & Wilson to Yonge Street & Sheppard without negotiating any big hills.

1212398726_40b7ece55e_b.jpg


Before:
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After:
TOPast&Present1973(67A).jpg



Solution:
I'll vote for the politician who proposes this.
 
Bicycling is not a very safe method of transportation, it is impractical in the winter and bike lanes often take away road space from cars/buses and make traffic worse.

False, false aaand false. And if walking is safer than biking, why are there actually more pedestrian injuries/fatalities involving cars?
 
If we built proper cycling infrastructure, like in Europe, it would cost a lot less than a subway and it would be safer than what we have now. Plus it has the added benefit of getting people exercise so it contributes positively to our health care costs.

Subways also don't and can't go everywhere, they're not cost-effective for short distance/multiple trips and they are prone to delays.
 
And to complicate the "ocean currents" claim even further, that has now been discounted. It was, after all, only a theory all these years with no proof. It's prevailing winds, the best theory being that they originate in North Am (Globe's rotation besides). In the event, the whole "we're so much colder" argument is baseless. There's cities in the north of Sweden and Finland with better cycling infrastructure and support.

In any case, the Gulf Stream doesn't have as much of an effect on the climate of continental Europe as it does on the north of the British Isles and west coast of Norway. Cities in Scandinavia have different (maritime) climates and differences in bike infrastructure have as much to do with cultural differences (being more or less car-centric, for example), topography, etc.
 
In any case, the Gulf Stream doesn't have as much of an effect on the climate of continental Europe as it does on the north of the British Isles and west coast of Norway. Cities in Scandinavia have different (maritime) climates and differences in bike infrastructure have as much to do with cultural differences (being more or less car-centric, for example), topography, etc.
Oslo, Stockholm and Helsinki all have winters that are very similar to those in Toronto. All four cities have an average high of around -1 in January. And North American cities that were mentioned earlier like Minneapolis and Montreal are colder. Climate is a non-issue.
 
I heard from Councillor Cressy's office that the City plans to install the Peter Street bike lanes this month. These were originally supposed to be installed in 2014 with the Richmond Adelaide pilot, but were delayed due to ongoing construction. They are waiting on having several consecutive nights with clear weather and no major events (e.g. blue jays games).
 
From Daily Telegraph (UK):

Is your bicycle lock good enough? Do you feel your bike is truly safe when you leave it out in the street?
Most good-quality locks are good enough to deter the passing opportunist – but what about more determined thieves, who may be equipped with lock-picking equipment, bolt cutters, or power tools?
Inventor and entrepreneur Daniel Idzkowski thinks he might have the answer. He is co-creator of the Skunklock – an innovative security device that promises to make anyone attempting to make off with your bike vomit.
“After witnessing first hand, and becoming victims of bike theft ourselves, we realized that people don’t need a bigger stronger lock, we needed a lock with a fundamental deterrent, says Idzkowski. “After six months of work, we created SkunkLock.
“Skunklock is a hardened medium-carbon steel U-Lock that's as difficult to compromise as the strongest U-Locks, AND comes with a surprise.
“Its pressurized inside with anoxious chemical deterrent that slams the would-be thief with noxious chemicals. The chemicals are so disgusting they induce vomit in the majority of cases, and elicit an instinctive response to run away immediately.”
If anyone attempts to cut into the Skunklock it instantaneously emits the sick-making chemical, a proprietary compound called ‘formula D_1’, which the company boasts has “economic implications for the thief”.
“Our formula irreversibly ruins the clothes worn by the thief or any of the protection they may be wearing, and replacing these items is likely more expensive than the resale value of your stolen bike (generally only 1/10 of the retail price).”
Describing the effects of the compound, Idzkowski told the Guardian: “At two feet it was pretty bad. It was absolutely vomit inducing in 99% of people. At five feet it’s very noticeable and the initial reaction is to move away from it. At 10ft it’s definitely detectable and very unpleasant.”
The SkunkLock team is appealing for funding on Indiegogo, where anyone who pledges $99 should receive their lock by June next year.
 
If anyone attempts to cut into the Skunklock it instantaneously emits the sick-making chemical, a proprietary compound called ‘formula D_1’, which the company boasts has “economic implications for the thief”.
“Our formula irreversibly ruins the clothes worn by the thief or any of the protection they may be wearing, and replacing these items is likely more expensive than the resale value of your stolen bike (generally only 1/10 of the retail price).”
Describing the effects of the compound, Idzkowski told the Guardian: “At two feet it was pretty bad. It was absolutely vomit inducing in 99% of people. At five feet it’s very noticeable and the initial reaction is to move away from it. At 10ft it’s definitely detectable and very unpleasant.”

Can't wait for the massive class action lawsuit when something like this inevitably malfunctions. Why do you think they stopped using the corrosive ink in clothing store tags?

Most good-quality locks are good enough to deter the passing opportunist – but what about more determined thieves, who may be equipped with lock-picking equipment, bolt cutters, or power tools?

If people are stealing your bike with power tools, you really need to find a better place to lock it - i.e. somewhere well-lit where your bike isn't the only one, or somewhere that's secured from the public.
 
If people are stealing your bike with power tools, you really need to find a better place to lock it - i.e. somewhere well-lit where your bike isn't the only one, or somewhere that's secured from the public.
Solution is simple. Don't lock your bike anywhere. When I cycle to work, I take my bicycle into my office and park it behind my desk. When I'm home, the bike's in my house, not in the shed or locked outside. You wouldn't leave your jacket, shoes or any other essential part of your means of conveyance outside; why the bike? And if you can't do this, don't ride; instead walk it, bus it or drive it, or accept the risk and ride a beater bike - one that was likely stolen from someone else.
 
Does anyone have any updates on the Lakeshore cycle track between Norris and First? Last time I cycled along that stretch was back in early September and nothing was done yet, even though the city's website says completion should have been by the end of summer.
 
Solution is simple. Don't lock your bike anywhere. When I cycle to work, I take my bicycle into my office and park it behind my desk. When I'm home, the bike's in my house, not in the shed or locked outside. You wouldn't leave your jacket, shoes or any other essential part of your means of conveyance outside; why the bike? And if you can't do this, don't ride; instead walk it, bus it or drive it, or accept the risk and ride a beater bike - one that was likely stolen from someone else.
I've been locking my $500 bike all over the city for years and have never had an issue. When I used to bike to work, the bike was locked in a parking garage and no one touched it. The other day I left my bike locked outside Finch Station all day without issues. I often bike to Islington Station to catch a Mississauga bus and no issues there either.
 
Solution is simple. Don't lock your bike anywhere. When I cycle to work, I take my bicycle into my office and park it behind my desk. When I'm home, the bike's in my house, not in the shed or locked outside. You wouldn't leave your jacket, shoes or any other essential part of your means of conveyance outside; why the bike? And if you can't do this, don't ride; instead walk it, bus it or drive it, or accept the risk and ride a beater bike - one that was likely stolen from someone else.
Yeah, if I can't keep my machine at least within sight (and locked just enough to prevent a grab and run) then I either don't take it, or keep it with me. I'm astounded by those who state: "Oh just leave your bike outside, it will be fine". That's when I say "See you later". Many of these people have machines, but of the consumer variety, they have no concept of how indispensable a valuable machine is. And of course, that they live/work in an area steeped in bike thefts.

If I go into a restaurant, I do use a cable lock, carrying a U-lock is like having an anchor in your back-pack, and that cable lock won't stop a determined thief, but gives me enough time to get out there and break bones. Needless to say, if I can't sit where I can see the bike, I don't go in.

Another joke is the apartment buildings that state you have to leave your bike in a room in the basement. I won't even waste swear words to describe how I feel about that. My bike sleeps with me. It's a fifty year old classic double-butted 531 British frame replete with Italian and French components. Engine's in pretty good shape too...
 
Does anyone have any updates on the Lakeshore cycle track between Norris and First? Last time I cycled along that stretch was back in early September and nothing was done yet, even though the city's website says completion should have been by the end of summer.
Not done the last time I used it either. :mad:
 

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