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Gardiner Expressway Hybrid Design

mburrrrr

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They started Oct 12 with reduced lanes and now they are working their way back to the start. Assuming 7 more months to complete the North side then the flip to the south side and repeat.
Friday May 22.
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May 20
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Manual pour for the middle section over Jarvis St.
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Jarvis St final section of the north side. working their way back east
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Monday May 25
one last north section deck to be completed.
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Allandale25

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Maybe this has been discussed before but I assume that they determined that the pillars holding up the deck are still in good shape and don't need replacement. Or is there any pillar replacement happening east of Jarvis? Other than the new ramping up portion closer to Cherry? I'm not that familiar with the design.
 

Northern Light

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ShonTron

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One little detail I notice is the maintenance of the curved one-piece light standards (which date back to the original low-pressure sodium lighting), rather than replacing with typical two-piece assemblies.

Still strange how Toronto still sticks with HPS cobraheads in new installations too (with the exception of the old city of Toronto's "arc" lamps, rather than modern LED.
 

Panontario

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They started Oct 12 with reduced lanes and now they are working their way back to the start. Assuming 7 more months to complete the North side then the flip to the south side and repeat.
Friday May 22.
Great pics. Thank you.
I believe that based on the schedule, the work on the North side should be completed within the next 3 months. The work on the South side should take less time and be completed by the end of 1st part of 2021. The Eastbound Jarvis on-ramp has been closed for construction as of last week allowing for concurrent work and faster completion of the South side.
 

Northern Light

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One little detail I notice is the maintenance of the curved one-piece light standards (which date back to the original low-pressure sodium lighting), rather than replacing with typical two-piece assemblies.

Still strange how Toronto still sticks with HPS cobraheads in new installations too (with the exception of the old city of Toronto's "arc" lamps, rather than modern LED.
As discussed in few different threads here, Toronto Hydro is now the owner of the streetlights; and doesn't seem to enjoy the job.

They did run a pilot testing LED lighting awhile back on a few streets, but it never went anywhere.

I'd actually like to see a bigger re-think.

I'd light to see dark-skies friendly lights; which means reducing the height of poles, but also, likely, increasing their number. (closer together) to get the same coverage.
 

darth_freeman

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Maybe this has been discussed before but I assume that they determined that the pillars holding up the deck are still in good shape and don't need replacement. Or is there any pillar replacement happening east of Jarvis? Other than the new ramping up portion closer to Cherry? I'm not that familiar with the design.
There is no pillar replacement as part of the current Jarvis to Cherry deck replacement works.

With all the deck sections replaced, all they have to do now is complete the north barrier wall and pave before traffic can shift to the opposite side and then rinse and repeat for replacing the entire south half of the Gardiner in this stretch.
 

mburrrrr

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Great pics. Thank you.
I believe that based on the schedule, the work on the North side should be completed within the next 3 months. The work on the South side should take less time and be completed by the end of 1st part of 2021. The Eastbound Jarvis on-ramp has been closed for construction as of last week allowing for concurrent work and faster completion of the South side.
Where did time go? Looks like they are ready for paving the north side. Wow 2 months!
98C4A55E-AF7D-4FAA-B11B-B758EDF41432.jpeg
 

44 North

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Now that pillars have been brought up I'm curious. With the Hybrid (not the current rebuild), what's the proposed distance between the pillars. I feel like with improved engineering for girders, and a less thrifty design, the distance between pillars should be double what exists now. Thus creating a more airy environment below.
 

urbannorth

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Now that pillars have been brought up I'm curious. With the Hybrid (not the current rebuild), what's the proposed distance between the pillars. I feel like with improved engineering for girders, and a less thrifty design, the distance between pillars should be double what exists now. Thus creating a more airy environment below.
Not that much. Measuring from Google, I get spans of about 70' (21m). Span to depth back in the day was about 25, so the girder depth was 32" or 36" (800 to 900 mm) - plus an 8" (200mm) concrete deck.

Now, steel can go to span to depth of 28 to 30 - so a bit better but not by much.
And, I believe they are using concrete girders - which had span to depth of 20 back in the day, or about 23 to 25 now. So, with a 36" (900mm) concrete beam, they can do about the same 21m span. I am now sure what the vertical clearance to the Lakeshore Blvd. is below, but if they can lower the underside of the beams, or raise the road profile, they can indeed do better.
I'd probably go with 2000mm deep girders, which could span 45m.

So yes, they could double the span, as long as they double the depth - not for the reasons you give.

When this was built, prestressed concrete girders were just in their infancy (first one in Ontario was 1955) - and Toronto didn't want to risk the new technology. It looks like cost was a factor, and 36" (rolled) steel girders were about the deepest "cheap girders you could get. Above 36" (well they did have 42" but it was a bit less common), they would have to use welded steel plate girders, which was more expensive than the rolled steel girders. This technology was also relatively new (riveted steel plate girders were done before), with the first welded bridges in Ontario in about 1950.
 

innsertnamehere

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Except that doesn't work. The cost of demolishing the Gardiner wasn't free - it was $600 million. The city isn't paying $1 billion to keep the Gardiner, they are paying $400 million, since that's the difference from the "demolish" option to the "keep" option.
 

urbanflight

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The city is wasting $1 billion just to rebuild, repair and keep the Gardiner, on top of the hundreds of millions of dollars that the city has already wasted in previous years on repairs to that disruptive, polluting piece of garbage. That $1 billion doesn't even include all the money that will be wasted in future repairs and maintenances.

The demolition of the Gardiner could save the city at least $500 million immediately, that already includes the redevelopment of the road into an urban boulevard. On top of that the city could save hundreds of millions of dollars from the repairs and maintenances to an archaic highway that could be avoided.

In total the city is projecting to waste $2.205 billion in the next 10 years solely over that highway that induce congestion, air and noise pollution and disruption to the urban environment.

 
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Northern Light

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I strongly prefer the 'Urban Boulevard' option; and one done at lower cost than the City's model, because I would cut one-lane each way on Lakeshore vs the City model.

That said, @innsertnamehere is closer on the direct cost savings of going at-grade.

But there is an additional factor, which is assessment growth from the Boulevard option.

Which would be even greater if we went with a slightly slimmer road, as I prefer.

That would be a positive impact into 100M+ per year range.

That adds up to 3B over 30-year timeframe.
 

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