News   Jun 14, 2024
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Finch West Line 6 LRT

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You can clearly see the buses travelling faster than the LRV. That's at the intersection of John Garland & Finch. No stop/ station at that intersection.
Again, can you at least wait until the line is operational and not undergoing test runs before making declarations about its nature?

You've been called out on this on multiple occasions and still you insist on parroting this half-baked, low information talking point. This has to be bordering on spam at this point. Testing is NOT service! The video is documenting the FIRST time a vehicle has traversed the entire length of the line. Does it strike you as intelligent for the first ever run over a brand new piece of infrastructure to be done at top speed? If you uncover some top secret Metrolinx documents proving the trams will be slow as molasses while running in revenue service, please feel free to share; otherwise, give it a rest, for the love of God. You'll be validated, or proven wrong, soon enough, and you won't get any brownie points for "clairvoyance".
 
Again, can you at least wait until the line is operational and not undergoing test runs before making declarations about its nature?

You've been called out on this on multiple occasions and still you insist on parroting this half-baked, low information talking point. This has to be bordering on spam at this point. Testing is NOT service! The video is documenting the FIRST time a vehicle has traversed the entire length of the line. Does it strike you as intelligent for the first ever run over a brand new piece of infrastructure to be done at top speed? If you uncover some top secret Metrolinx documents proving the trams will be slow as molasses while running in revenue service, please feel free to share; otherwise, give it a rest, for the love of God. You'll be validated, or proven wrong, soon enough, and you won't get any brownie points for "clairvoyance".
I'd like to point out that this isn't even 'abundance of caution' type stuff... I can't be the only person to remember just how badly the first run of the JFK Airtrain ended can I?
 
Took a drive along the Finch West corridor on Sunday and took some progress photos. Not sure I agree with using a smooth curb to separate bikes and traffic, especially when most of the LRT RoW seems to have smooth curbs to enable emergency services to travel through. Wondering if anyone has some insight into this.

New Finch West Station Access (looking SW from Finch Ave)

New Finch West Station Access (looking SW from Finch Ave)
Finch West Station Portal Access (Looking SW from Finch)

Finch West Station Portal Access (Looking SW from Finch)

Emery Station (Weston Rd) - Only station with barriers across from platform (looking SW from Finch)

Emery Station (Weston Rd) - Only station with barriers across from platform to prevent pedestrians crossing (looking SW from Finch)

Some Foliage on the corridor (East of Islington Ave)

Some Foliage on the corridor (East of Islington Ave) - I feel like there is very little use of greenery on this line as opposed to what was done on Eglinton East LRT.

Example of an abrupt bump-out taper (east of Islington Ave)

Example of an abrupt bump-out taper (east of Islington Ave) - There were many of these and they all looked ugly as sin. They also don't appear to have enough room for a service vehicle?

An Example of a centre platform @ Mount Olive Station

An Example of a centre platform @ Mount Olive Station

Highway 27 Portal (Looking East)

Highway 27 Portal (Looking East)

Highway 27 Portal (Looking South)

Highway 27 Portal (Looking South)

Example of Smooth curbs being used for Bike Lanes

Example of Smooth curbs being used for Bike Lanes

Wire Clutter near the Maintenance Facility (west of Jane St)

Wire Clutter near the Maintenance Facility (west of Jane St)
 
I know in this specific case both platforms were placed on the same side because of the grade changes on the other side of the intersection for the tunnel, but what are some other cases where placing both platforms on the same side is preferred?

I've read before for YRT Viva stops (Allstate Parkway and Highway 7) that this could be due to left turn traffic greater in one direction when compared to the other, but that doesn't really make sense because there is no cross direction pedestrian phase available.

I ask because of the large planter island on the opposite side needed to keep through lanes going through the intersection straight, which could be painted on asphalt instead, but increases the width of the right of way.
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I know in this specific case both platforms were placed on the same side because of the grade changes on the other side of the intersection for the tunnel, but what are some other cases where placing both platforms on the same side is preferred?

I've read before for YRT Viva stops (Allstate Parkway and Highway 7) that this could be due to left turn traffic greater in one direction when compared to the other, but that doesn't really make sense because there is no cross direction pedestrian phase available.

I ask because of the large planter island on the opposite side needed to keep through lanes going through the intersection straight, which could be painted on asphalt instead, but increases the width of the right of way.
View attachment 570622
Generally from an operations perspective, it is much more favourable and predictable to work with farside platforms, with consistent siding as a close second. The reasons for having platforms on one side (i.e., farside for one leg and nearside for the other) usually has to do with physical constraints (unless the objective is to have a centre platform.
 
Cheeky of them to claim 5 minute headways translates to 7 trains in 30 minutes.

I can see what they mean: a train comes at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 min, that's 7 in total.

Obviously, this is not how the line capacity should be calculated (their method includes the 0 min and 30 min trains into both the current 30-min period and the previous/next 30-min periods, double-counting their capacity). They should simply divide 30 min (period) by 5 min (interval between trains). Someone in the PR department needs a bit more math training.
 
I can see what they mean: a train comes at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 min, that's 7 in total.

Obviously, this is not how the line capacity should be calculated (their method includes the 0 min and 30 min trains into both the current 30-min period and the previous/next 30-min periods, double-counting their capacity). They should simply divide 30 min (period) by 5 min (interval between trains). Someone in the PR department needs a bit more math training.
It's genuinely one of the stupidities of the North American transit conversation that we are so wedded to talking in terms of headway. Vehicles per hour is a vastly better framing...
 
It's genuinely one of the stupidities of the North American transit conversation that we are so wedded to talking in terms of headway. Vehicles per hour is a vastly better framing...
I disagree. If I show up at a stop I want to know how soon until my vehicle comes. Vehicles per hour is a statistic that, while useful in the right context, takes more effort to convert into usable scheduling information, especially for those (like me) who are mathetically challenged.

The real answer should be to list both. It's like that old debate about wayfinding - station signs should say both the direction the vehicle is heading in, and the name of the terminus, to better serve different ways people have of figuring out the world.
 

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