News   Jun 13, 2024
 1K     1 
News   Jun 13, 2024
 727     0 
News   Jun 13, 2024
 312     0 

Danforth Line 2 Scarborough Subway Extension

SCC is a very IMPORTANT part if the CITY that should be integrated to the City's backbone to have any chance to grow with any importance in the City
Is it though?

I mean, Sherway Gardens is short of subway access and easily could become a major transportation hub for Mississauga commuters, and it has a lot of development potential that is soon to be underway with *shocker* no subway access.

Your arguments can easily be applied to Sherway Gardens as well.
 
Is it though?

I mean, Sherway Gardens is short of subway access and easily could become a major transportation hub for Mississauga commuters, and it has a lot of development potential that is soon to be underway with *shocker* no subway access.

Your arguments can easily be applied to Sherway Gardens as well.
Sherway is also next to two highways!
 
Your arguments can easily be applied to Sherway Gardens as well.

Except people in Etobicoke don't seem to have the inferiority complex / paranoid "everyone is against us" mentality of Scarborough residents like this guy that has dominated this thread.

Oh and people elsewhere in Toronto don't seem to have a total lack of appreciation of logical thinking than this guy. "Ridership? Bah - that means nothing"
 
Is it though?

I mean, Sherway Gardens is short of subway access and easily could become a major transportation hub for Mississauga commuters, and it has a lot of development potential that is soon to be underway with *shocker* no subway access.

Your arguments can easily be applied to Sherway Gardens as well.


Keep Stretchingggggggggggggggggggggggggg. Still throwing shite to see what sticks

Sherway is on the border of Sauga & is not a designated Growth center. SCC is near the heart of Scarborough maybe more similar to Islington in Etobicoke. STC has 4x the condos currently I believe. 3 vs. 12. But hey im sure it seemed like a good comment. The both have malls right. haha

Saying that I wouldnt be shocked to see the discussion occur with Vaughan getting a subway as Sauga will be in the pipeline now that the 905 bottle is being cracked.
 
Last edited:
Sherway is on the border of Sauga & is not a designated Growth center. SCC is near the heart of Scarborough maybe more similar to Islington in Etobicoke. STC has 4x the condos currently I believe. 3 vs. 12. But hey im sure it seemed like a good comment. The both have malls right. haha
Condos don't really generate much subway ridership anyway, offices do. So I'm not sure why this is relevant.

The Sheppard subway line is lined with condos, yet the ridership still isn't great.
 
Condos don't really generate much subway ridership anyway, offices do. So I'm not sure why this is relevant.

The Sheppard subway line is lined with condos, yet the ridership still isn't great.

I never said that... so not sure what you are even trying to debate here?

Aside from Yonge & Sheppard which has been fully blessed by the transit Gods. None of the other stops on Sheppard even compare to STC in terms of ridership or potential anyway.


So the assumption you make about an office unit providing more commuters compared to condo unit who would obviously then be commuting outwards without the office is very weak. The RT & transfer is a deterrent for all. Companies looking to set up satellite offices would be more attracted to a seamless connection at STC of the RT.Even if its not a big deal to you It still make SCC less attractive. And that's a problem when we are talking about investment potential.
 
Last edited:
I never said that. Aside from Yonge & Sheppard which has been fully blessed by the transit Gods. None of the other stops even compare to STC in terms of ridership or potential anyway.
Really? Don Mills seems to have more potential than Scarborough Centre as well. But you're obviously biased.
 
Really? Don Mills seems to have more potential than Scarborough Centre as well. But you're obviously biased.

Not sure. Don Mills is currently seeing a condo boom because of the SUBWAY stop. If they bring the DRL one day for sure It will have potential like Yonge Sheppard. But ya its a decent comparable I guess. SCC has way more land to develop around.

No Bias here as I don't live near SCC I just want to see respect for SCC and Scarborough in general. And comparing SCC to location which have had subway for years to decades is not fair but gives some idea of what it will be. I really do think SCC will do much better than most here care to believe
 
Not to mention the existing office parks at Sheppard and Victoria Park. I wonder how STC employment compared to that node.
And there isn't even rapid transit there. Another area with lots of offices but no rapid transit is 404 and Eglinton. I wonder how STC compares to that as well.
 
Vic Park & Sheppard would be next to nothing business wise without the subway being extended where it was already along Sheppard. There was always the "hope" they would ne next to sell on.

I strongly believe the Sheppard stubway should be converted to LRT and we can build long from East to West seamlessly. But to relieve that nuisance for many Scarborough commuters would take some money. Unless you really felt bad for blatant multi class transit designing of a Cityno one cared enough except those residing in Central to the West end of Sheppard in Scarborough. This was truly a joke and the fact It was defended is even more disturbing. Atleast the LRT will be a nice loop now and somewhat more justifiable then the McGuinty days.

We can only fight one piss poor design in Scarborough and even then... So SCC it is
 
Last edited:
I can't think of any other 6km stretch of subway which has an average daily ridership of 31,000. Even the Sheppard subway beats that.

Sheppard is a bit ahead of the current SRT. The current SRT has a ridership of 39,000, so it's not hard to imagine that once it is upgraded to a Subway and development kicks in it could match or exceed.

TYSSE Extension will probably be less than 39,000 I imagine.

Is it though?

I mean, Sherway Gardens is short of subway access and easily could become a major transportation hub for Mississauga commuters, and it has a lot of development potential that is soon to be underway with *shocker* no subway access.

Your arguments can easily be applied to Sherway Gardens as well.

This is really a pointless comment: "Sherway could be a major transportation hub"...I mean yeah it could, but it's not. And there are no plans for it to be (although my crazy DRL West theory is to connect at Sherway instead of the Bloor line).

It has one bus from Kipling station and is primarily accessed by cars as it has exits from 3 different freeways.
 
Sheppard is a bit ahead of the current SRT. The current SRT has a ridership of 39,000, so it's not hard to imagine that once it is upgraded to a Subway and development kicks in it could match or exceed.

TYSSE Extension will probably be less than 39,000 I imagine.
The development on the entire Sheppard Line is also still going strong, so it will continue increasing and STC will not necessarily match or exceed.

Also, TYSSE has a greater ridership projection than the Scarborough Subway in 2031. So still waiting for a 6km stretch of subway that has less ridership than the Scarborough Subway.
 
Last edited:
This place needs a change of tone regarding Scarborough and its residents.

This article isn't about the subway, it's about the subway being the lightning rod for all the frustration that this part of the city had to endure over the years. Everyone take a breather, read this Toronto Star article and resume debating in a different tone. The arrogance and condescending tone does a disservice to this great community.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/com...orough-deserves-respect-fairness-hepburn.html

Scarborough deserves respect, fairness: Hepburn

Subway fight a lightning rod for feelings of alienation by residents

This is not a column about the controversial $3-billion Scarborough subway extension, which critics want to kill and replace with a cheaper light-rail system.

Rather, it’s a column about respect and fairness for a part of Toronto that has received a bad rap for decades.

Lost in history is the name of the person who first coined the term “Scarberia,” smearing the eastern suburb and its 600,000 residents seemingly forever.

While it may seem harmless and funny to some, the snarky term has usually been linked with unwarranted associations with high crime rates, ugly strip malls, lousy restaurants, crowded schools, outdated hospitals as well as grimy factories and warehouses.

Worse, “Scarberia” is used to imply that Scarborough residents are culturally challenged, uncool and out-of-touch compared to people in other parts of Toronto, especially in the downtown core.

Article Continued Below
For years, proud Scarborough residents have raged against the “Scarberia” image in the firm belief they aren’t treated fairly when it comes to everything from transit to parks and schools.

Occasionally that seething anger erupts into the open — with stunning force.

That’s what happened in the 2010 mayoral race when Rob Ford swept the area by a huge margin over George Smitherman, his downtown challenger. Ford campaigned on a wildly successful theme that boiled down to: “I love you; I hear your pain; and I’m going to take care of you.”

And it’s happening again today, although few will admit it, as the fight plays out over the Scarborough subway extension.

Indeed, the current subway debate has become a lightning rod for this alienation felt in Scarborough.

Fuelling the feeling among Scarborough residents that the “downtown elites” look down their noses at them is a steady stream of anti-subway criticism from downtown city councillors, bloggers, Twitter-world typists, television talking heads and in columns, editorials and cartoons in local newspapers.

“There is anger and a feeling of being left out and of people standing in the way of our being able to get our fair share,” Councillor Glenn De Baeremaeker (Ward 38, Scarborough Centre) said in an interview. “This is not just about a subway; it’s about letting us into the family.”

De Baeremaeker supports the subway extension to the Scarborough Town Centre, like every elected local, provincial and federal politician from Scarborough except councillor Paul Ainslie. “On the subway file, there is an overpowering feeling of the need for fairness,” De Baeremaeker added.

Councillor Norm Kelly agrees, noting it can take up to two hours for Scarborough residents to get downtown on public transit.

On the subway, Scarborough residents see a new line going to the Vaughan city centre and a proposed extension of the Yonge line to Richmond Hill and ask why, if the subway is okay for these 905 regions, isn’t it okay for Scarborough.

For them, it’s just doesn’t seem fair.

Adding to their sense of being treated unfairly is everything from parks to art festivals and bike lanes.

Why hasn’t Luminato, the city-sponsored arts festival, ever held an event in Scarborough? Why does the city spend countless dollars to create Sugar Beach on the waterfront at the foot of Jarvis St., but hasn’t put much money into Bluffer’s Park since it was created in the 1950s? Why isn’t there a decent waterfront trail in Scarborough while the city operates one from the eastern Beach area into Etobicoke? Why does the central campus of The Scarborough Hospital have the oldest operating rooms in the entire province?

Why do guides of top Toronto restaurants fail to list a single place east of Victoria Park Ave. although an international food critic last year declared the area “the best ethnic food suburb” he had ever seen? Why does the city fund huge fireworks displays at Ashbridge’s Bay and Mel Lastman Square in North York, but only gives a pittance for similar events in Scarborough.

The list is endless — and the resentment strong.

Kelly, who has represented the area as an alderman, federal MP and city councillor for more than 30 years, says that despite efforts to improve the image of the area, the condescending perception of “Scarberia” remains strong.

Like De Baeremaeker, he argues it’s a case of mistaken identity, that while Scarborough has some of the poorest areas in the city, it actually has a lower crime rate than the rest of the city, has beautiful and safe neighbourhoods and a huge, ethnically diverse population that gets along together just fine.

Scarborough residents are generally proud of their area and feel the rest of the city “just doesn’t get it,” Kelly added.

Indeed, it is time the rest of Toronto “gets” Scarborough — and maybe starts to treat it with the respect and fairness it deserves.
 

Back
Top