Casa Condos (Cresford Developments) - Real Estate -

How big (# SF) is the Siena model?
Should we blame the listing agent or the seller, maybe both?

No idea. However, based upon measurements given in the listing, it seems to be around 500 sq. ft. Perhaps, someone, currently living in the building, could throw some light.
 
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Casa suffers from one of the worst cases of "This is your kitchen-wall right in the middle of your living room...OH.. and we threw a stupid interior column in there too" school of modern condo building, I have seen in a long while.

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(Courtesy the RE/Max Condos Plus http://www.remaxcondosplus.com/property.php?propid=C1853655&agent1=harding )

If all those columns had been square and located partially on the balconies, they would have freed up tons of interior floor space. All the while barley sacrificing (mostly unused) balcony space and still hardly changing the outside elevation and appearance of the tower.

Why do buyers accept these crappy designs?
 
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Casa suffers from one of the worst cases of "This is your kitchen-wall right in the middle of your living room...OH.. and we threw a stupid interior column in there too" school of modern condo building, I have seen in a long while.

If all those columns had been square and located partially on the balconies, They would have freed up tons of interior floor space. All the while barley sacrificing (mostly unused) balcony space and still hardly changing the outside elevation and appearance of the tower.

Why do buyers accept these crappy designs?


the same reason buyers accept linear kitchens, window-less bedrooms, washroom doors opening into kitchens/living areas, etc ...
aggre$$ive marketing by developers/realtors that RE will continue to go up and outprice locals has scared people into buying anything to get on the property ladder have made it acceptable to buy crap.
 
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I rather like that layout, but then again, I have a very DIY attitude... I am imagining how I'd maximize the efficiency of that layout. (Custom furniture involving wheels, rollers and the like. Everything in my world must fold flat or have three purposes or it's not acceptable.:)) Of course, a splash of colour in the kitchen appliances etc would do wonders.

For example, that column: a sleeve that fits around it functioning as both a light source, a shelving unit and a plant holder. Or, custom build a free-standing fireplace that curves around the post, then finish the post in a vibrant bright magenta or soothing green, turning an obstacle into the "highlight" of the condo.

Then I'd gut the bedroom turning it into a loft-style bed with storage below.

Finally, why not a 4-6" raised platform with storage drawers beneath for either the bedroom or living room area?
 
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^Yes I love finding cool solutions to space problems too. I watch H&G too, but I think you missed my point here.

These interior columns are completely unnecessary and are there for no reason other than to placate ignorant home buyers who believe round pillars are a hallmark of new condo construction. And that they signify they have "arrived" in Chic and hip Coollsville.

"Look at me. I have a round column in my living room. It's industrial, so I must live in a loft or a commercial space. Doesn't that make me look sophisticated and contemporary?"

No, it makes you look like a sucker...

That column could have been rectangular and part of the wall and not taken any floor space. Let's face it, those columns take up more space than just what their square footage would occupy. There is a 2 foot radius around them that is useless. Not to mention getting furniture to work around them is impossible.
 
http://www.remaxcondosplus.com/property.php?propid=C1853655&agent1=harding

Link to a recent listing of a 1 bedroom condo -- Siena model -- at $ 400,000.00, without parking but with locker.

Listing agent seems to be out of touch with reality?

You folks have it all wrong. If you've seen some of my posts it's clear that I've expressed my views on some things being stupidly over priced. However, 400K is just about bang on as the current going rate for a Siena. It's a 690sqft 1 BR corner with zero waisted space. You get a sliding door in the bedroom to maximize the small size of it and in favour have a 12x30 foot open living area. You also get a 220 sq ft wrap around balcony. What's ridiculous is CHAZ next door attempting to sell pre-construction 430sq ft units for 300K. Basically it works out to $572 psqft when you factor in the locker and I always like to use the apples to apples comparison...remember that as a bonus with this particular unit you are getting a corner with over 50 feet of floor to ceiling window space and a huge balcony. The listing price is very reasonable.
 
These interior columns are completely unnecessary and are there for no reason other than to placate ignorant home buyers who believe round pillars are a hallmark of new condo construction.

...

That column could have been rectangular and part of the wall and not taken any floor space. Let's face it, those columns take up more space than just what their square footage would occupy.

I thought that for some units, having pillars is the trade-off for having full wall sections completely made of glass? Aren't the pillars structural?
 
I thought that for some units, having pillars is the trade-off for having full wall sections completely made of glass? Aren't the pillars structural?


they are structural, but i think Traynor's point is that the column could be made into a pillar instead and pushed out to where the outer wall is, so it does not impede on the floorspace.

what dood are full wall sections of glass when a part ofyour view gets blocked out anyways with a column in the middle of your space?
 
they are structural, but i think Traynor's point is that the column could be made into a pillar instead and pushed out to where the outer wall is, so it does not impede on the floorspace.

what dood are full wall sections of glass when a part ofyour view gets blocked out anyways with a column in the middle of your space?

I understand, but still don't see how moving the pillar to being part of the 'glass wall'/outer wall would improve things, or even be practical while avoid being unslightly. I doubt that the pillar's diameter could be smaller or else the builder would have done that.
 
I understand, but still don't see how moving the pillar to being part of the 'glass wall'/outer wall would improve things, or even be practical while avoid being unslightly. I doubt that the pillar's diameter could be smaller or else the builder would have done that.

Please see the following example by Traynor.
It has nothing to do with the diameter's size, but the use of round pillars vs. square; and it's placement within the suite vs. being integrated into the structural frame of the building itself.

By pushing the pillars to the corners, you add usable floor space and don't lose any actual view outwards. On the outside of the building they could use the same glass as the window wall to cover the pillars and you would have an added architectural feature, to enhance the elevation.

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(Originals courtesy official Chaz floor plans PDF)
 
From construction point, there must be some reasons for putting round pillars where they are rather than square ones in the corner.

Can anyone with some knowledge of construction, could, please, comment?
 
Siena is 688 sq f excluding balcony. At $400K this is a bargain compared to VIP prices for Chaz (preconstruction) at $375K for a 510 sq f unit.

$400K for 688 sf isn't a 'bargain', it's just not assinine compared to Chaz at $750 PSF for poorly designed floorplans.

i hope this one falls flat on it's face as the RE bubble pops
 

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