News   May 30, 2024
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Canada and the World

From a customer service point of view, that is to say, wait times, and access to diagnositcs, we're definitely lagging as well.

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A bit stale (2016) but its not like things have improved.

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Interesting to see Italy as an outlier for short waits.
 
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Setting aside the factual concerns of Maher's piece, what's relevant to this thread is that the image of Canada has suffered. And especially among those who saw Trudeau's Canada as the progressive hope.
 
Setting aside the factual concerns of Maher's piece, what's relevant to this thread is that the image of Canada has suffered. And especially among those who saw Trudeau's Canada as the progressive hope.
I will say that as someone who was very hopeful upon their election in 2015 after the less then stellar Harper years, I'm generally disappointed by the Liberals' performance.
 
Cost is an issue vs other industrialized countries with single payer systems. We pay a lot for mediocre results.
I've never had any issues with the Canadian healthcare system, either here in the GTA or when I lived in Fredericton, NB. Here in the GTA, we have a family doctor with short waits for in-person or telephone appointments, had two babies, have used the emergency departments without massive waits, have had excellent cancer care and screening. In NB, we attended a clinic where there were several doctors, so you would make an appointment and whomever was free would see you, which worked for us. Both the Killam (Halifax) and Toronto children's hospitals were fantastic for our kids. Just last month my doctor called me and said it was time for the "stern tube" check, and once I said okay, within 48 hours I had the call from the Provis-Rudd Endoscopy Clinic, and within a fortnight I was done and home again. I appreciate my experience may not be everyone's, especially in rural areas, but for my family we're satisfied with the health care system in the GTA and in NB.

Back in 1998 when we moved to downtown Toronto my wife said at the time, this is a great place to grow old as it's walkable, and many of the country's top hospitals are just down the road. She was spot on.
 
I will say that as someone who was very hopeful upon their election in 2015 after the less then stellar Harper years, I'm generally disappointed by the Liberals' performance.

Some of it was definitely COVID and is kinda excusable. But this government's policies have definitely exacerbated problems at home. At the same they seemed to think progressive rhetoric was a substitute for hard power on the world stage. That strategy has clearly failed too.
 
I've never had any issues with the Canadian healthcare system, either here in the GTA or when I lived in Fredericton, NB. Here in the GTA, we have a family doctor with short waits for in-person or telephone appointments, had two babies, have used the emergency departments without massive waits, have had excellent cancer care and screening. In NB, we attended a clinic where there were several doctors, so you would make an appointment and whomever was free would see you, which worked for us. Both the Killam (Halifax) and Toronto children's hospitals were fantastic for our kids. Just last month my doctor called me and said it was time for the "stern tube" check, and once I said okay, within 48 hours I had the call from the Provis-Rudd Endoscopy Clinic, and within a fortnight I was done and home again. I appreciate my experience may not be everyone's, especially in rural areas, but for my family we're satisfied with the health care system in the GTA and in NB.

Back in 1998 when we moved to downtown Toronto my wife said at the time, this is a great place to grow old as it's walkable, and many of the country's top hospitals are just down the road. She was spot on.

I think lots of people have good experiences. My mother in law was diagnosed with cancer in 2020 and received great care on a really fast timeline. That's very common, but doesn't change the fact that wait times for non-emergency diagnostics and procedures, even ones where there is a huge quality of life issue that needs solving, are way longer than most comparably wealthy countries. I had to get an MRI recently and the wait was over seven months.

And of course the difficulty in finding a family doctor or family health team, which is the way into health care services generally for most people, is very well-documented in Ontario. And about to get much worse as boomer doctors continue to retire.
 
I think lots of people have good experiences. My mother in law was diagnosed with cancer in 2020 and received great care on a really fast timeline. That's very common, but doesn't change the fact that wait times for non-emergency diagnostics and procedures, even ones where there is a huge quality of life issue that needs solving, are way longer than most comparably wealthy countries. I had to get an MRI recently and the wait was over seven months.

And of course the difficulty in finding a family doctor or family health team, which is the way into health care services generally for most people, is very well-documented in Ontario. And about to get much worse as boomer doctors continue to retire.
While the NHS is a mess in the UK, I like how those who can afford it can remove themselves from the queues. My grandmother needed a knee replacement and paid out of pocket instead of waiting. I suppose we have that here in Canada as well, as if you have the cash you go to the USA (or Mexico).
 
It seems like for ultrasounds, x-rays, routine blood tests, etc., the delays have mostly been eliminated through private providers (with public payer). And similar for some procedures like hernia surgery. I am not sure why it hasn't been possible to use those tactics more broadly to reduce other kinds of delays.
 
This is a capability I've long advocated for. Both to reduce reliance on the US for surveying our own airspace and to be able to make a solid NATO contribution. It's good to see the government finally see the same logic.

 
This is a capability I've long advocated for. Both to reduce reliance on the US for surveying our own airspace and to be able to make a solid NATO contribution. It's good to see the government finally see the same logic.

All they will need is the crews to operate them, which speaks to other challenges facing the CAF.

I wonder if they will favour NATO/US compatibility or a Saab product that favours a certain domestic aircraft manufacturer.
 
All they will need is the crews to operate them, which speaks to other challenges facing the CAF.

It's a challenge to be sure. But right now we actually have a ground based radar squadron that controls fighters at each fighter base and a good number of Air Battle Managers (ABMs) posted on exchange to Tinker, Oklahoma (USAF) and Geilenkirchen, Germany (NATO) to work on their E-3 AWACS. It's a trade that has as many people working outside Canada as inside Canada. A good chunk of the staffing for a Canadian AEW capability will come from shutting down the radar squadrons and repatriating some of the really expensive foreign postings (we get all our housing, medical, dental, and dependent education paid for when overseas).

I wonder if they will favour NATO/US compatibility or a Saab product that favours a certain domestic aircraft manufacturer.

It's a really big question. The three AUKUS countries are all going to be operating the Wedgetail by the end of the decade. It's also going to replace the NATO E-3 fleet and will be operated by an Asian ally we want better relationships with. Here's an example of a buddy of mine working on a NATO AWACS:


On the other hand, Bombardier and Saab are dying to get a local win. The GlobalEye is a great aircraft. But it's got some significant drawbacks. No air-to-air refueling capabilities. No 360° radar coverage. And a very small confirmed userbase of only 9 aircraft between the UAE and Sweden. Also, Bombardier is only selling the airframe. It's not doing significant integration work.

I know the RCAF preference is for the Wedgetail and I mostly agree with that. But I think Saab is likely here just because of Bombardier. Personally, I'd rather give the AEW contract to Boeing and work with Bombardier to replace the VVIP fleet with Globals and to get a few Global based surveillance aircraft that is similar to what Australia developed. The US Army just picked the Global with similar intent. We could actually develop a highly capable aircraft that is marketable to our allies.


Edit. Should be noted that Bombardier and Saab isn't the only potential matchup. Bombardier also teamed up with L3 Harris to bid on the NATO E-3 replacement.

 
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