A motion by Toronto Ward 28 Councillor and Deputy Mayor Pam McConnell this past April recommended a $1,000,000 increase in funding to enlarge and expedite the first phase of work on the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal and Harbour Square Park Revitalization. The first phase does not include work on the actual ferry terminal, but improves the access from Queens Quay to the existing terminal. At last week's Waterfront Toronto Design Review Panel, just what is planned for the reworked walkway was revealed.

Jack Layton Ferry Terminal, KPMB, West8, Waterfront Toronto, TorontoPhase 1A of the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal and Harbour Square Park Revitalization, image courtesy of Waterfront Toronto

Originally, phase 1A was set to simply repave a portion of the pathway leading up to the ferry terminal from Queens Quay, however, thanks to the increased funding from the City, phase 1A has been extended by 46m and changes will include a completely repaved and reconfigured pathway leading to the ticket booths, plus new trees, a new lighting system to match that of Queens Quay, and a new way-finding system. 

Jack Layton Ferry Terminal, KPMB, West8, Waterfront Toronto, TorontoRendering of Phase 1A of the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal (View south towards the terminal), image courtesy of Waterfront Toronto

A key element of the phase will include cobblestone paving to match the visual identity of Queens Quay Boulevard (and ultimately the rest of the central waterfront). Waterfront Toronto's signature wooden lighting fixtures will also be incorporated into the park and terminal surroundings, further increasing the cohesiveness of the waterfront's visual identity. 

Jack Layton Ferry Terminal, KPMB, West8, Waterfront Toronto, TorontoRendering of Phase 1A of the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal (View north towards Queens Quay), image courtesy of Waterfront Toronto

The pathway leading to the ticket booth will also be widened in order to accomodate large numbers of people waiting in line, with concrete paving extending beyond the cobblestone paving. The surrounding green spaces included in phase 1A will be landscaped with varying slopes and incorporate seating and have defined borders. The statue of Jack Layton will be moved slightly west of its current position, placing it a few feet above the existing grade with stairs leading up to it. 

Jack Layton Ferry Terminal, KPMB, West8, Waterfront Toronto, TorontoRendering of the entrance periscope from Queens Quay Boulevard, image courtesy of Waterfront Toronto

The new way finding system is inspired by the nautical alphabet, visual language, and the island's visual identity. Periscopes will lead visitors from the street to Queens Quay, acting as a sort of gateway marker for pedestrians. Utilizing large text, bold colours, and impressive scale, the periscopes will clearly signpost to visitors where the terminal is, while the interactivity will surely delight passersby. Just like a periscope on a submarine, those looking into viewfinder of the periscope will get a magnified view over the trees and harbour to the island, getting a glimpse of their destination before they begin their journey. 

Jack Layton Ferry Terminal, KPMB, West8, Waterfront Toronto, TorontoRendering of Phase 1A of the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal (View south towards the terminal), image courtesy of Waterfront Toronto

Work is set to begin this September, and set to finish in May of 2018, just in time for the busy summer season next year. We will keep you updated on any developments that follow over the next year. In the meantime, be sure to check out our database file, linked below, for more information and renderings of the entire project. You can join the discussion in the associated Forum thread, or leave a comment in the space provided on this page.