It has been several months since we last visited the Queen West site of BSäR Group Of Companies12 Degrees for an update on the construction of the 11-storey, Core Architects-designed condominium development. In the time since our previous update in March of this year, installation of the building's clear window wall and grey spandrel cladding has been completed, and the exterior hoist has been removed from the building's western elevation.

12 Degrees, BSäR Group Of Companies, Core Architects, Toronto12 Degrees, viewed from the southwest on Beverley Street, image by Marcus Mitanis

With the upper floors fully clad now, the building's 12 degree rotation of three floors is more obvious, (with a fourth rotated floor partially hidden by an overhang), providing a little eye candy for those going past the building: looking up here delivers more than the typical rewards.

Looking up at 12 Degrees from the southwest corner, BSäR, Core, TorontoLooking up at 12 Degrees from the southwest corner, image by Marcus Mitanis

With the hoist down and window installation complete, the only major exterior element left to finish before the exterior reaches apparent completion is the installation of the remaining dark "Wiarton black" split-faced limestone on the building's lower floors. A scaffold covers roughly one third of the lower three floors' Beverley Street frontage to allow installation of the final sections of stone.

12 Degrees, BSäR Group Of Companies, Core Architects, TorontoGround level masonry work at 12 Degrees, image by Marcus Mitanis

Though the building's unconventional design sets it apart from its surroundings, the stone cladding found on the lower floors of 12 Degrees acts as a contextual bridge, creating a dialogue between the Victorian homes to the north and the modern condominium building above. 

12 Degrees, BSäR Group Of Companies, Core Architects, Toronto12 Degrees, viewed from the north on Beverley Street, image by Marcus Mitanis

If you have noticed that the rotated three floors have had a slice taken out of them at their northwest corner, you are not the only one. The architect's plan was to complete the 12 degree rotation at the corner, having the sides meet at a 90 degree angle, but the City insisted upon a step back, not compromising on building rules for fear of setting a precedent.

12 Degrees, BSäR Group Of Companies, Core Architects, Toronto12 Degrees, viewed from the southwest on Beverley Street, image by Marcus Mitanis

Additional building information and renderings can be found in our 12° dataBase file, linked below. Want to get involved in the discussion? Check out the associated Forum threads, or leave a comment in the space provided at the bottom of this page.