After months of painstaking work, scaffolds surrounding a group of Yonge Street storefronts are now being removed, revealing reinvigorated heritage façades at the base of FIVE Condos just north of Wellesley. Crews at the 48-storey tower by MOD, Graywood and Five St. Joseph Developments have also begun installing the balcony glass that will enhance its undulating form.

The restored Yonge Street frontages, image by Marcus MitanisThe restored Yonge Street frontages, image by Marcus Mitanis

Designed by Hariri Pontarini Architects, one of the key features of the project involves the historical restoration of several properties bordering the tower. With heritage restoration ERA Architects on board, nearly half a block of Victorian storefronts have been revitalized with new windows, new roofs and a cleansed brick façade. The properties, which have also been strengthened with new a internal structure, will house retail at the ground level with condominium suites above.

Closing in on the detailing of the Yonge storefronts, image by Marcus MitanisLooking closer at the detailing of the Yonge Street storefronts, image by Marcus Mitanis

The base of Five Condos, image by Marcus MitanisThe base of Five including its Yonge Street frontages and 5 St. Joseph, image by Marcus Mitanis

The 110-year old Gothic-revival façade of 5 St. Joseph has been incorporated into the project and will act as the condominium's main entrance when the dust settles and residents begin to occupy the property. The preservation of the four-storey frontage is significant as it marks the largest façade retention in Toronto's history. The structure, also serving as a podium, will be topped off with a roof garden landscaped by Janet Rosenberg and Associates.

The preserved façade of 5 St. Joseph, image by Marcus MitanisThe preserved façade of 5 St. Joseph, image by Marcus Mitanis

The west border of the site at St. Nicholas Street is also undergoing a dramatic transformation. The rear section of 5 St. Joseph, which was demolished to make way for the tower's excavation, has been replicated with new brick. The narrow cobblestoned St. Nicholas will be lined with shops to enhance the pedestrian experience in a section of Downtown with limited sidewalk space. 

The St. Nicolas façades rebuilt with new brick, image by Marcus MitanisThe St. Nicholas façades have been rebuilt with new brick, image by Marcus Mitanis

Balconies at the west end of the tower are beginning to be encased in two-toned glazing. The bottom half of each glass panel is an opaque smoky shade of grey, contrasting with the translucent shade of blue above. Once more of the balcony glazing has been installed in easier to see areas, we will take a closer look at how this element will complete the look of the building.

Balcony glass installation proceeds at the west end, image by Marcus MitanisBalcony glass installation proceeding at the building's west end, image by Marcus Mitanis

Cladding on the tower portion continues, almost reaching Five's slanted peak. Upon completion, the project will add another influx of residents to a busy corridor which has witnessed a surge in development applications in recent years. 

Five is located just north of Yonge and Wellesley, image by Marcus MitanisFive is located just north of Yonge and Wellesley, image by Marcus Mitanis

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