It has been a dozen years since the Sheppard subway went into service, and in the time since the transit line opened to the public, the suburban stretch of Sheppard Avenue East in North York has seen some impressive growth. Many new high-rise developments have sprung up along the line between Yonge and Don Mills, the most ambitious of which to see construction along this busy artery is Concord Park Place, a multi-towered master-planned community growing across 45 acres.

Park Place is adding a tremendous amount of residential density to an area that has been historically dominated by big box retail and large industrial warehouse buildings, immediately north of the city's busiest stretch of highway, and immediately east of Bessarion station, the city's least used subway station. While many of the residents—and future residents—of the development will use a car as their primary mode of transportation, as roads get clogged, the proximity of the Sheppard line's stations will keep Park Place easily accessible.

Concord Park Place, Tango, Page + Steel / IBI Group, TorontoConcord Park Place viewed from the west, image by Jack Landau

In the image above, we can see the completed and occupied earliest phases of Concord Park Place on the left, while Tango stands tall on the far right and Tango2 is rising centre right. The 31-storey, Page + Steele / IBI Group Architects-designed Tango is very close to completion, with finishing touches currently being installed on and in the building.

Concord Park Place, Tango, Page + Steel / IBI Group, TorontoTango (right) and Tango2 (left), image by Jack Landau

Tango stands out thanks to part of its public art installation, visible in pixelated form at the top of the tower. 'Spring', by artist James Lahey, consists of translucent photographic window panels depicting trees and flowers in blossom running up the full height of the tower's north side, before dissolving into the pixelated pattern visible above. In the image below, taken by Forum contributor drum118 last month, we can see some of the translucent photographic panels as seen from the lower floors of the building.

Concord Park Place, Tango, Page + Steel / IBI Group, TorontoJames Lahey's Spring on the tower's lower floors, image by drum118

Though it is difficult to tell from the image above, the series of photographs that make up the installation have been worked onto a translucent film and inlaid directly into the glazing of the tower. For a closer look at the art installation, check out this video from Inkblot Media.

 

Down at ground level, Tango features amenities on the north side and townhomes on the west side. Below, we take a look at the podium facing southeast from Esther Shiner Blvd.

Concord Park Place, Tango, Page + Steel / IBI Group, TorontoPodium of Tango at Concord Park Place, image by Jack Landau

Just one month ago, concrete was being poured for the sidewalks in front of the townhouses, and in the time since, grass has been added to complete the townhouses' mini-yards.

Concord Park Place, Tango, Page + Steel / IBI Group, TorontoTownhouses as seen in June, image by drum118

Concord Park Place, Tango, Page + Steel / IBI Group, TorontoTownhouses as seen in July, image by Jack Landau

The nearly complete development is adding 350 condominium and townhouse units to the rapidly changing area. 

Concord Park Place, Tango, Page + Steel / IBI Group, TorontoTango at Concord Park Place, image by Jack Landau

We will return tomorrow for a look at Tango2, currently rising across Esther Shiner Blvd to the north.

Additional information and renderings for this building can be found in our Tango dataBase file, linked below. Want to get involved in the discussion? Check out the associated Forum threads, or leave a comment in the space provided at the bottom of this page.