Over the last two days, Urban Toronto has been looking at the permanent art installations which have been placed above streetcar shelters on the 512 St. Clair route. We continue the journey today, but if you have missed the first two, have a look at the previous articles first to familiarize yourself with the project: Parts 1 and 2.

'Moon Transit' by Jeannie Thib, at Christie. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04'Moon Transit' by Jeannie Thib, at Christie. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

'Moon Transit' by Jeannie Thib, at Christie. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04'Moon Transit' by Jeannie Thib, at Christie. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

The glass panels at Christie are decorated with successive phases of the moon as they flow through night clouds. The artist responsible is Jeannie Thib, who named her creation Moon Transit. The piece does have some significance to its location, as St. Clair is known to be located on a crest which offers views of downtown Toronto.


'One Among Many' by Sally McCubbin, at Arlingon. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.0'One Among Many' by Sally McCubbin, at Arlingon. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

'One Among Many' by Sally McCubbin, at Arlingon. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.0'One Among Many' by Sally McCubbin, at Arlingon. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

The station stop at Arlington features a piece constructed by Sally McCubbin, titled One Among Many. Like many of the other installations, this work has a message to it: that some people enjoy the hustle and bustle of city life as well as the anonymity that it brings, while others loathe the isolation and coldness. Drawings on the glass are inspired by real Toronto street scenes which the artist observed.


'Flatspace' by Sara Graham, at Winona. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04'Flatspace' by Sara Graham, at Winona. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

'Flatspace' by Sara Graham, at Winona. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04'Flatspace' by Sara Graham, at Winona. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

Sara Graham created Flatspace, part of the metal screens category of the competition. The Winona stop is now topped off with a glaring orange mesh of intricate lines that is actually somewhat reminiscent of Home Depot shopping carts.


'Au Bruit de la Guerre (With the Noise of the War)' by Mark Laliberte, at Oakwoo'Au Bruit de la Guerre (With the Noise of the War)' by Mark Laliberte, at Oakwood. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

'Au Bruit de la Guerre (With the Noise of the War)' by Mark Laliberte, at Oakwoo'Au Bruit de la Guerre (With the Noise of the War)' by Mark Laliberte, at Oakwood. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

The artwork at Oakwood station is the brainchild of Mark Laliberte, and features conspicuous looking faces throughout a mash of coloured panels. Named Au Bruit de la Guerre (With the Noise of the War), the artwork is a reproduction of playful comic-book pages. It is definitely worth viewing up close, but is also quite striking from a distance.


'Corridor' by Art Zone, at Glenholme. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04'Corridor' by Art Zone, at Glenholme. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

'Corridor' by Art Zone, at Glenholme. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04'Corridor' by Art Zone, at Glenholme. Image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011.07.04

The piece at Glenholme station was created by stained glass artists Art Zone and is titled Corridor. A lone multicoloured strip runs horizontally across all four panels, traversing various terrain and landscapes printed onto the glass, depicting the path the St. Clair streetcar travels upon.


Stop by again tomorrow when the next five interesting pieces of public art will be covered, and again for Friday’s wrap-up.

If you would like to find out more about the St. Clair streetcar route, check out UrbanToronto's St. Clair Right-Of-Way thread.

Leave a comment below to share your opinion about the artwork gracing these stations.