News   Feb 23, 2024
 1K     1 
News   Feb 23, 2024
 2.5K     3 
News   Feb 23, 2024
 961     0 

Yonge & Eglinton

anything north of a few blocks north of Eglinton is still considered North Toronto. You can feel it just by looking at the increasing subway spacing.
For most suburbanites, it is when they cross Eglinton that they feel they are in the city.

"North Toronto" was a town that was absorbed into Toronto like Yorkville, Forest Hill and later East York, North York etc. It included Yonge & Lawrence, Yonge & Eglinton, Yonge & Davisville.
 
About 5 years ago, I was out for drinks on a patio and some acquaintances of friends stopped by. One of them worked for Toronto Hydro at Yonge and Carlton. Somehow the word "midtown" came into conversation, and she declared that Midtown was at Yonge and Carlton, and she was quite insistent that any other description was just plain wrong. I remember the incident well, because she was rude and pushy about it, and wouldn't even acknowledge that the concept of midtown might have changed over time or that different people might have different views. Seemed like an odd issue for her to alienate people over.
She *was* wrong (unless she went back in time), and this is just an anecdotal story, but it illustrates the fact that Midtown is a big, amorphous concept.
She would now have new ammunition for her wrong argument via...
Midtown Reds Tavern
 
anything north of a few blocks north of Eglinton is still considered North Toronto. You can feel it just by looking at the increasing subway spacing.
For most suburbanites, it is when they cross Eglinton that they feel they are in the city.

To be specific, it is more like when they cross Blythwood. Yonge between Eglinton and Blythwood is very much urban.
 
To be specific, it is more like when they cross Blythwood. Yonge between Eglinton and Blythwood is very much urban.

Well I mean, everyone has different definitions of "urban", but I would say North York Centre (Yonge between Finch & Sheppard) is very urban in many ways. You've got everything from mixed use small stores, transit, tall buildings, very high density & transit use and walkability.

I would say the Yonge & Lawrence area is urban too, but it doesn't have tall buildings (which to me isn't necessarily the definition of "urban").
 
I found this map of the Y-E study area in the plan:

Mm5mvND.png


This is what I think the Y-E neighborhood looks like.

But.... I can assure you that people who live immediately to the east (toward Bayview) and south (toward Merton) of that study area very much live lives centered around the Y-E study area.

The study area 'Secondary Plan' has borders that show this reality:

0HKHB2o.png
 
Last edited:
To be specific, it is more like when they cross Blythwood. Yonge between Eglinton and Blythwood is very much urban.

I could be wrong but from what I can determine The Sherwood senior's home a few blocks south of Blythwood is the first building on Yonge Street coming north from the lake that doesn't have a retail frontage. That's over 8km of retail shops (or park). Between Bythwood and Lawrence there are a number of strictly residential buildings, then north of Lawrence you're back into predominantly retail frontages all the way to Richmond Hill.
 
Last edited:
Anyone else find the retail north of Y&E seems to be struggling, the higher end retail that is, up to Lawrence that is. There were at least 20 vacancies, the most I've seen in say 10 years or so.
 

Back
Top