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Who would you like to see win the 2016 US election?

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wild goose chase

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I wonder since Bernie Sanders' odds seem slim now (though there's still hope I'd like to imagine for him!), if the vast majority of his supporters, many of whom are really passionate about Bernie's policies precisely because they do want to change what's perceived as "establishment", would be willing to pick Clinton instead as their second choice or if some would go towards Trump or even another candidate, or else do something like a protest vote.

That's one wildcard that people have been talking about, with some suggesting that might be the case and a significant factor in the election while others say that when push comes to shove, the majority of the Sanders supporters would still go for Hillary out of "pragmatism".
 

wild goose chase

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The age/generational divide seems very noticeable with young people like college students I've seen riding the bus with messages/pins/stickers etc. supporting Bernie. They seemed quite passionate.
Whereas Hillary supporters tend to less upfront about it but I suppose showed it at the polls solidly while not necessarily wearing it "on their sleeve" or so to speak.

I remember hanging out at a couple parties with 30-somethings, many of who were quite educated and had professional jobs, and when the conversation turned to politics, a lot of them openly voiced support for Bernie, though the area where I live myself actually went for Hillary according to the map. Sometimes, I'll must admit, it's fun to talk US politics as a Canuck here and only after talking for a while have people realize you are (or out yourself as) not American and are seeing it from the "outside"!

I wonder why Hispanics in Chicago seem to have supported Sanders more than Hispanics elsewhere (as well as African Americans in Chicago) but my impression does seem to be that young (perhaps college-aged or college-going, or maybe 20-30 somethings) White or Hispanic (and even Asian, though they're a smaller population) Chicagoans tend to be more the ones with the pro-Bernie messages/stickers/pins more prominently displayed walking down the street, as compared to African Americans though I do see Sanders supporters openly identifying themselves, again mostly young people, of all races.
 

CodeMonkey

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I wonder since Bernie Sanders' odds seem slim now (though there's still hope I'd like to imagine for him!), if the vast majority of his supporters, many of whom are really passionate about Bernie's policies precisely because they do want to change what's perceived as "establishment", would be willing to pick Clinton instead as their second choice or if some would go towards Trump or even another candidate, or else do something like a protest vote.

That's one wildcard that people have been talking about, with some suggesting that might be the case and a significant factor in the election while others say that when push comes to shove, the majority of the Sanders supporters would still go for Hillary out of "pragmatism".
It's more likely that Sanders supporters won't turn out at all. Hillary most recent wins are a result of declining turnout, and with most media outlets already talking like she already has the nomination, I'm not surprised that people have just given up.
 

King of Kensington

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I wonder why Hispanics in Chicago seem to have supported Sanders more than Hispanics elsewhere (as well as African Americans in Chicago) but my impression does seem to be that young (perhaps college-aged or college-going, or maybe 20-30 somethings) White or Hispanic (and even Asian, though they're a smaller population) Chicagoans tend to be more the ones with the pro-Bernie messages/stickers/pins more prominently displayed walking down the street, as compared to African Americans though I do see Sanders supporters openly identifying themselves, again mostly young people, of all races.
Sanders did well among Hispanics in Nevada also.

There's also a notable difference between AAs in the South and in northern cities. Sanders received around 10% of the Black vote in the South and 30% in the North. I'm guessing it's because Southern blacks are more socially conservative and religious (and Bill Clinton is a Southerner), while in cities like Chicago, Detroit and Cleveland - many come from families that were members of unions.
 

adma

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New York would be interesting to watch, as it is HRC's home state (and the state where Sanders had his formative years). Oh, and it is rich in delegates too.
*Political* home state. But remember that she grew up in Chicago, and was, uh, the consort to the Arkansas governor...
 

King of Kensington

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New York would be interesting to watch, as it is HRC's home state (and the state where Sanders had his formative years). Oh, and it is rich in delegates too.
Unless things change dramatically, New York is very favorable to HRC. She should win NYC and Westchester/Long Island easily. However I could see Sanders doing well Upstate.
 

wild goose chase

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I wonder how the leaked Panama papers will, if at all, have a major influence on the US election. Some are saying how it shows that Bernie Sanders' ideas are vindicated, but it seems like most people reacting strongly to the leak so far are not North American (American or Canadian) but more so Europeans.
 
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