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TTC: Scarborough Subway Extension (formerly LRT replacement) (City of Toronto, Design Phase)

superelevation

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I find it funny when people complain about the SRT transfer to the subway, little do they know the province intends on creating another replica of the exact same transfer procedure with the Ontario Line and Eglinton Crosstown.

Actually, the Ontario/Eglinton Line transfer will probably been even worse since the Eglinton line is even deeper.

Honestly the transfer at Kennedy isn't bad, especially using the long escalator.
 

OneCity

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Honestly the transfer at Kennedy isn't bad, especially using the long escalator.

The main issue was never the transfer design itself, it was always the ridiculous placement of the transfer in terms of geographic location. Scarborough Centre is the logical transfer point in terms of allowing more central connections to pick up feeders at both Lawrence and Ellesmere and for the purposes of building the future Growth node.

On an obviously larger scale this would be more comparable to making people hop on and off the Lakeshore East at Danforth or Lakeshore West at Exhibition and then having people say well transfers are 'part the system'. Sure, of course. But that doesn't make them intelligent or necessary when placed in from of Main destinations
 
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Transportfan

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East York was an odd community. The marriage of the area north of Danforth and Leaside was a quirk of geography; Toronto should have amalgamated both these areas 100 years ago, similar to other nearby neighbourhoods. And neither was particularly integrated with the Thornside area which grew up in between (which has closer links to nearby Flemingdon Park in North York). And then there's the odd Parkview Hills subdivision, and whatever the area along the west end of St. Clair East is called, which like Bermondsey area, fit better into Scarborough than anything else.

The municipal structure of all Metropolitan Toronto was quirky in the sense that none of the former suburban "cities" were actually historical settlements at all, just sections of the original York Township that were hived off into new townships as development progressed outwards, absorbing actual towns in the process. In the former Montreal Urban Community, the satellite towns were kept intact.
 
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JSF-1

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The municipal structure of all Metropolitan Toronto was quirky in the sense that none of the former suburban "cities" were actually historical settlements at all, just sections of the original York Township that were hived off into new townships as development progressed outwards, absorbing actual towns in the process. In the former Montreal Urban Community, the satellite towns were kept intact.
That's not entirely true. While the three York's were pretty much expansions of the original York (now Toronto), Scarborough and Etobicoke were independent townships since 1850, although they were both part of the larger "York County" alongside Toronto and everything we consider York Region. Infact York County still exists today as York Region, just without Metro Toronto which was split off into its own regional municipality in 1954.
 
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Transportfan

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That's not entirely true. While the three York's were pretty much expansions of the original York (now Toronto), Scarborough and Etobicoke were independent townships since 1850,

Okay, but my point was none them ever existed as actual towns that originally grew separately from the City of Toronto (in the way that Stoney Creek, Dundas, and Ancaster were in respect to Hamilton) as such. Townships are not settlements in that sense, just large rural districts that Toronto just expanded into.
 
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Transportfan

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From the top of my head, I can think of Morningside Ave in Scarborough, and a local street called Morningside Ave in Swansea near High Park. I can also think of Church Street in Downtown, and Church Street in Weston.

They can solve the problem like they did with the two "Main Streets" in Markham (Eg: Main Street Unionville).
 

lenaitch

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Okay, but my point was none them ever existed as actual towns that originally grew separately from the City of Toronto (in the way that Stoney Creek, Dundas, and Ancaster were in respect to Hamilton) as such. Townships are not settlements in that sense, just large rural districts that Toronto just expanded into.

The original municipalities of Metro Toronto, in addition to the City of Toronto, were:

Towns
- New Toronto, Mimico, Weston and Leaside
Villages
- Long Branch, Swansea and Forest Hill
Townships
Etobicoke, York, East York, North York and Scarborough
 

Transportfan

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The original municipalities of Metro Toronto, in addition to the City of Toronto, were:

Towns
- New Toronto, Mimico, Weston and Leaside
Villages
- Long Branch, Swansea and Forest Hill
Townships
Etobicoke, York, East York, North York and Scarborough

To make things more clear: The final five were never historical towns in their own right. Where's historic "Olde Town Etobicoke" for example? It never existed. Townships don't count as distinct settlements. They only grew due to spillover from Toronto which also engulfed independent towns like New Toronto, Mimico, Weston, Leaside, etc. in the process. None of these real historic towns existed as political entities in 1998 when Metro was amalgamated.

Very different scenario compared to the status of Stoney Creek, Dundas, and Ancaster when Hamilton-Wentworth was amalgamated. They were real towns with their own historic cores.
 
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lenaitch

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To make things more clear: The final five were never historical towns in their own right. Where's historic "Olde Town Etobicoke" for example? It never existed. Townships don't count as distinct settlements. They only grew due to spillover from Toronto which also engulfed independent towns like New Toronto, Mimico, Weston, Leaside, etc. in the process. None of these real historic towns existed as political entities in 1998 when Metro was amalgamated.

Very different scenario compared to the status of Stoney Creek, Dundas, and Ancaster when Hamilton-Wentworth was amalgamated. They were real towns with their own historic cores.

I didn't say they were. My post, listing all the original lower governments, was merely in response to the comment that "none" of them were towns.

This discussion is getting a tad confusing as it is going on in two threads.
 

north-of-anything

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bendale.png


Just taking a look at how much of the area around the Lawrence/McCowan intersection could be intensified with a new transit station to serve it. The circled green areas would be tempting to redevelop into midrise structures, although the buildings fronting Lawrence might require careful phasing as to not disrupt the services they provide. On the other hand, take one look at the Rockcliffe Care Community building and tell me it's a warm and inviting structure.

The red box is apartments that I like the scale of, but acknowledge could maybe be improved upon. Maybe once there's rapid transit along Lawrence East, like a (probably much-needed) true BRT.
 

OneCity

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View attachment 282885

Just taking a look at how much of the area around the Lawrence/McCowan intersection could be intensified with a new transit station to serve it. The circled green areas would be tempting to redevelop into midrise structures, although the buildings fronting Lawrence might require careful phasing as to not disrupt the services they provide. On the other hand, take one look at the Rockcliffe Care Community building and tell me it's a warm and inviting structure.

The red box is apartments that I like the scale of, but acknowledge could maybe be improved upon. Maybe once there's rapid transit along Lawrence East, like a (probably much-needed) true BRT.

Haven't heard any updates here https://www.shn.ca/future-facilities/

If option#3 is being seriously considered to relocate the General hospital towards the Centre the Province and City have a very nice size parcel to get creative with
 

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