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TTC: Other Items (catch all)

What would you have them do? Keep the station called that as an advertisement for a destination that no longer exists?
Why confused riders or the public on renaming a station when there is no good reason to do so in the first place?? What is the big deal that you must rename a station as someone thought it wasn't nice word to use the name that been used for decades???

Not a simple change to remove the station name done in corten
 
Why confused riders or the public on renaming a station when there is no good reason to do so in the first place?? What is the big deal that you must rename a station as someone thought it wasn't nice word to use the name that been used for decades???

Not a simple change to remove the station name done in corten
Well, if the TTC were smart (which they're not), they would've called the station Steeles West to begin with. They're not, so they didn't, so now they find themselves in this unenviable position. You want to talk about confusing people, how does it not confuse people to point to a "pioneer village" when no such attraction by that name exists? For a while it would've coasted off old-name-inertia, but eventually the generations would've cycled through and people would have moved in and moved away and suddenly you get a ton of people who never experienced Pioneer Village being a current name.

It's not about whether the word should've kept being used or not - you can direct your comments to the actual pioneer village. The fact of the matter is that the TTC, in their infinite wisdom, named the station for a landmark, so if the landmark gets renamed, they need to follow suit. If Yorkdale or Scarborough Town centre or York University were renamed it would be equally necessary to rename those stations too. Where is the value in keeping a station named for a landmark which has changed its name?
 
Frankly, if one is going to visit the "Village at Black Creek" and is confused that the nearest TTC station is "Black Creek Pioneer Village" you probably should not leave home without adult supervision.
An admirable sentiment, but it's not about that. I am very much a believer in not catering to the geographically stupid. The problem is that keeping an outdated station name is also stupid. What is the point of a station name if it's inaccurate, even if it is entirely reasonable to expect that people behave like adults and do research on the location they are going to beforehand? At that point you might as well call your station Narnia, Moria, or Island of Sodor.
 
TTC should double down and drop Village from the station name. Maybe sell the naming rights to the gas stations
 
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An admirable sentiment, but it's not about that. I am very much a believer in not catering to the geographically stupid. The problem is that keeping an outdated station name is also stupid. What is the point of a station name if it's inaccurate, even if it is entirely reasonable to expect that people behave like adults and do research on the location they are going to beforehand? At that point you might as well call your station Narnia, Moria, or Island of Sodor.
Names change all the time and for lots of reasons - the Sony Centre became Meridian Hall and Skydome changed to Rogers Centre because the sponsorship changed, Dundas Square changed because some people misunderstood history and Mr Dundas is now reviled. One could avoid all of this changing of maps, TO360 signage and stations by simply numbering everything (or making up names) but we use descriptive names because the idea is to help people find a place they want to go to. In the case of Pioneer Village station the station is really NOT that close to the attraction and I agree it should not have been used at all so it is, I suppose, the worst of all possible worlds!
 
Frankly, if one is going to visit the "Village at Black Creek" and is confused that the nearest TTC station is "Black Creek Pioneer Village" you probably should not leave home without adult supervision.
The station isn't called "Black Creek Pioneer Village". It's simply "Pioneer Village". I'd think a renaming is in it's future.

A renaming doesn't have to be expensive for the system; it should be relatively cheap at the rename Eglinton West and/or Dundas stations.

Steeles West seems like a good choice. But Black Creek may be an option.
 
The station isn't called "Black Creek Pioneer Village". It's simply "Pioneer Village". I'd think a renaming is in it's future.

A renaming doesn't have to be expensive for the system; it should be relatively cheap at the rename Eglinton West and/or Dundas stations.

Steeles West seems like a good choice. But Black Creek may be an option.
Though the cost seems high, the Star article linked to above says:

"Should the TTC alter Pioneer Village Station’s name, the standard cost would be around $1.5 million, according to Green." It would mean changing all their in-vehicle maps, other signage etc etc.
 
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Anyone know if a strike would mean immediate disruption to subway and streetcars or would things just run until the lack of maintenance catches up to them?
 
Anyone know if a strike would mean immediate disruption to subway and streetcars or would things just run until the lack of maintenance catches up to them?
Subway and streetcar service would be shut down, and I imagine the same would be true with bus operations as well.
 
Tentative agreement reached between TTC and CUPE Local 2

Apr. 22, 2024

Bargaining teams from the TTC and CUPE Local 2 have reached a tentative agreement, avoiding job action and potential service disruptions.

The following is a bargaining update statement from TTC CEO Rick Leary:

“I am extremely pleased that we’ve been able to reach a tentative agreement with CUPE Local 2 and avoid any job action and service disruptions.

This is a fair deal that is affordable for the TTC and respectful of the important work the 650 members of CUPE Local 2 do every day to keep our system safe and our service reliable.

As the agreement still needs to be ratified by the union membership and the TTC Board, we cannot share details at this time.

I want to thank the TTC Board for its guidance and leadership as well as members of both bargaining teams for their hard work to reach this agreement without any negative impact on TTC customers.”
 
TTC continues its transition to be zero-emissions before 2040

Apr. 22, 2024

Today is Earth Day, and there is no better way to celebrate than by taking transit. On Earth Day and every day, the TTC is committed to a greener city. As the organization looks ahead to a zero-emissions fleet and future, the TTC is electrifying its vehicles and decarbonizing its facilities and operations.

The TTC is well on its way to electrifying 50 per cent of its fleet by 2030 and 100 per cent before 2040, making transit operations more resilient while remaining reliable and focused on the needs of customers. With support from government partners and customers, the TTC is contributing to a greener future for Toronto and working to improve air quality, reduce noise pollution, and decrease its environmental footprint. In fact, between 2017 and 2023, the TTC is estimated to have decreased its GHG emissions by 20 per cent organization-wide.

\"Reliable, environmentally-friendly public transit has been a priority for me since day one,\" said Mayor Olivia Chow. \"On Earth Day and every day, I am proud to work with my partners in both the federal and provincial governments to make sure the people of Toronto have a low-emissions service they can count on.\"

\"Our goal is to run a sustainable transit system that our customers can continue to rely on and be proud of. These significant strides toward a zero-emissions future are a big step in that direction,\" said TTC Chair, Jamaal Myers. \"Zero-emissions vehicles are the future of sustainable transit. I am so pleased that we are continuing to bring new, clean, quiet vehicles to customers and employees in neighbourhoods across the City of Toronto.\"

\"We have an obligation to our customers and the next generation to do more for the environment, improve air quality and reduce noise pollution. I am so proud of the great work the TTC team is doing and the leadership they are showing in transitioning to a cleaner, greener future,\" said TTC CEO Rick Leary. \"I want to thank the TTC Board, all of our government funding partners, our employees, and our vendors for helping to make this possible.\"

The TTC is sharing a progress update on its TTC Green program to celebrate Earth Day.

Fleet update

The TTC's subways and streetcars already have zero emissions, and there are more electric vehicles on the way. By the end of 2025, the TTC will have 60 more streetcars thanks to joint funding from the federal government, Ontario government, and the City of Toronto. This will bring the streetcar fleet to a total of 264 vehicles, with the ability to carry the equivalent of nearly 700 buses!

The TTC is also set to welcome 340 more battery-electric buses by the end of 2025, bringing its total eBus fleet to 400, by far the largest in North America. These buses, which will make up approximately 20 per cent of the TTC's entire bus fleet, will serve communities all over the city and are funded jointly by the federal government and City of Toronto.

In addition to eBuses, the TTC has an impressive fleet of hybrid-electric buses. By the end of 2024, hybrid buses will make up 40 per cent of the TTC's entire bus fleet. These vehicles are a lower-emission technology and run as zero-emissions vehicles in Green Zones.

These Green Zones are pre-identified locations near bus stops, subway stations, TTC facilities, and anywhere customers, the public, or TTC workers are the most. In these areas, TTC hybrid-electric buses run with the diesel engine completely off, improving local air quality. Approximately 130 Green Zones have already been established across the city using geo-fencing, and the scope is constantly expanding.

Changes are also coming to the TTC's Wheel-Trans fleet with an upcoming RFP to pilot up to 10 battery-electric models. This pilot will allow for evaluating these vehicles in the TTC's operating environment and provide lessons learned to inform future procurements so that the TTC can continue to deliver the reliable service its customers count on. The TTC has already begun reducing Wheel-Trans vehicles' environmental footprint with a transition from diesel to gasoline that began in 2017.

Infrastructure

The TTC is constantly looking at ways to optimize its energy consumption. More charging equipment is being installed across the TTC thanks to a joint investment from the federal government and City of Toronto and a new energy management system is being deployed commission-wide.

The TTC is actively working to install 238 new eBus charge points at different garages across the commission in advance of the new vehicle deliveries. Work on Wheel-Trans and non-revenue vehicle charge points is also underway, to ensure electric vehicles are able to hit the road as soon as they arrive.

Innovation

The TTC is also working on an Innovation & Sustainability Strategy to identify innovative technologies and ideas that maximize benefits to customers, the people of Toronto, and the environment. The framework for that strategy will be reviewed at the TTC's upcoming Audit & Risk committee meeting in June.

With well over a million rides a day, the TTC continues to find new, innovative, and environmentally friendly ways to deliver service to the GTHA while maintaining reliability.

Today and every day, the TTC wants to remind its customers that just by taking transit, they are making a difference to the environment.

Here are some additional fun facts in celebration of Earth Day:

• Line 1 carries the equivalent of 26 lanes of traffic or 8-9 Gardiner Expressways

• There's a 70 per cent chance your trip today was partly or fully on a zero-emissions vehicle, reducing your own carbon footprint

• Today, your GHG emissions are reduced by 79 per cent when taking the TTC instead of a car

• Between 2017 and 2023, our hybrid and electric buses saved the equivalent of 80 Olympic-sized pools of diesel (200,000,000 L fossil fuel avoided)

To learn more about how the TTC makes Toronto a cleaner, greener place to live and work, visit ttc.ca/green
 

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