Toronto City Hall and Nathan Phillips Square | ?m | ?s | City of Toronto | Perkins + Will

CityStay

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You tried to correlate Toronto having this sign with a lack of tourist attractions. When I brought of an example of Amsterdam who also has this sign, you have gone off on some nonsensical tangent..

Yes Amsterdam removed the sign from in front of the museum but they still have it at the airport so no they still see a need for the sign...

I'm talking about other cities like Brisbane, Budapest, Guadlajara. Are you also on their city forums telling them about their lack of tourist attractions

I find it funny that you dislike Toronto but you have so much time to be here taking cheap shots. You don't contribute anything constructive here on how to improve the city just a whole bunch of foolishness.

Grow up and find something positive to do.
No, I posited that Amsterdam had a sign as a coordinated effort in city branding (the sign was just minor offshoot that happened to become popular) just like the Toronto sign was a one-off that happened to coincide with the popularity of the selfie crowd.

My point is that nobody goes to a city based on a big letter sign (at least I hope not) and that the Toronto sign was something you would see after seeing the 4-5 viable attractions available downtown.

The sign has no effect on tourism whether or not a city has heaps of attractions (Amsterdam) or few (Toronto). It's just a f*cking sign!

I don't know WTF you're talking about with the cities you mentioned.. not at all clear in your initial post..

I left Toronto because I saw what was coming: it was becoming a city of douchebags, unaffordable, and 10 -20 years behind on everything that makes a city liveable - things that most other cities take for granted.

And I'll try not to "spend so much time" here by reducing my 18 posts per month, just to please you!
 

CityStay

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Good use of sarcasm.

Also, build Toronto in the 13th century, like Amsterdam.
Don't worry about that. Most of the cheap-shit investor/speculator crap that has been built in Toronto over the last 20 years wont last 1 century never mind 8.

Imagine, if you will, the 100th anniversary of CityPlace. Ok, to make it somewhat more believable - the 50th. Demolition crews descend upon the mistake by the lake..Various buildings around town are being condemned. People are asking "Why are so many buildings being demolished?" "What were they thinking at the beginning of the century?" "Why were they allowed to build so much substandard crap?" "Where are we going to live?"

While the people in Amsterdam will still be living in their 13th century homes.
 
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MisterF

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Don't worry about that. Most of the cheap-shit investor/speculator crap that has been built in Toronto over the last 20 years wont last 1 century never mind 8.

Imagine, if you will, the 100th anniversary of CityPlace. Ok, to make it somewhat more believable - the 50th. Demolition crews descend upon the mistake by the lake..Various buildings around town are being condemned. People are asking "Why are so many buildings being demolished?" "What were they thinking at the beginning of the century?" "Why were they allowed to build so much substandard crap?" "Where are we going to live?"

While the people in Amsterdam will still be living in their 13th century homes.
Say what you will about the way that Cityplace looks, I've sure been a critic of its design. The streetscape along Bremner could have been a lot more engaging, for example. But the reinforced concrete highrises being built today will last centuries easily. They're more structurally solid than anything built in the medieval era. A modern highrise can last essentially indefinitely with proper maintenance. Criticisms about the quality of Toronto's public spaces have a lot of merit, but your post about Cityplace is nonsense.
 

adma

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Ok, the harsh reality is that people consider it art. The dumber we make our art the better, I guess. I didn't think our city needs "advertising", I think it's pretty amazing without the stupid sign. Instead of dumbing art down, maybe the city should invest in quality public art (no turtles if you do know what I mean), or even better, public spaces (looking at you - half finished Nathan Phillips Square).
Meanwhile, whither Henry Moore's Archer...
 

condovo

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Oh, and Toronto needs canals. Ontario Place, the Toronto Islands, and Villiers Island aren't enough.
Let's have Steve Martin settle this with his famous quote, "Toronto is just like New York but without all the stuff."

Toronto needs more stuff and not in 800 years. A major planetarium? Botanical gardens? (The tiny one Edwards Gardens doesn't count.) A winter garden? A Toronto Museum? A second AGO campus, built from scratch? Another observation deck, aside from the one at the CN Tower? A central library? (The Reference Library is not the same as a central library.) We need all this stuff and more, for tourists and locals.
 
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salsa

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Good news.



However the culture of austerity at city hall continues to look really bad on us, as highlighted in is part of the article.

In less than a year the sign racked up more than 122 million global “social media impressions” — views and online shares. But City council in 2016 balked at spending money to replace and improve the $100,000 installation.

One councillor volunteered to fix the TORONTO sign himself, another wanted to “privatize” it, while a third proposed the city try to sell it. But council eventually agreed to issue a tender for a company to make a new sign, paid with city reserve “rainy day” funds. The city’s cost for design and construction is $490,000. Removing the old sign, installation, wraps, a three-year maintenance contract help bring the total cost to $761,842. Toronto is welcoming public donations to help defray the costs.
 

pman

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Would it be possible to criticize the maple leaf and indigenous symbol additions on the grounds that they’re visual clutter, or would that be forbidden speech? Because one of the objectives of the NPS rebuild was de-junking what started out as a wonderful and spare example of mid-century modernism, and the Toronto sign additions seem to be the start of a re-cluttering process.
 

interchange42

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Those two elements of the sign, separate from the letters, each come with a ton of symbolic freight that will be next to impossible to subtract from the debate. Even if some of those writing can successfully do that, others will not, and the whole thing will just become an exercise in pushing others' buttons, so, NO, anything more in that regard will be considered trolling in this thread. Take those things that are freighted with politics to a thread where people are expecting politics.

42
 

MetroMan

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They’re assembling it today.

Bad news: they still built a podium for this thing. I’ve always said that while the sign was great for its international attraction and social media photogeneticity, the Toronto sign has acted as a barrier to the pond/ice rink.

The sign should have been remade as individual letters that you could walk in between, maintaining the porous nature of the square. Instead, they’re just replicating the old sign with longer lasting materials.

B96084A4-EE95-43B3-B822-11A242B49E9A.jpeg
 

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