Finch West LRT and TYSSE: Finch West Station | ?m | ?s | Mosiac TG | Arup

EnviroTO

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I forget - how is the Finch West LRT connecting up again? Or have we all just forgotten about that now...
The LRT connection is an afterthought as designed. They knock out a wall to build a tunnel from the unpaid zone... originally the knock out was for servicing neighbouring properties if they developed hence the unpaid zone. They actually aren't even building the link in this project. When and if the Finch West LRT is built it would be entirely up to that project to fund the linkage. Maybe then they would be a bit more creative in how to build it.
 

W. K. Lis

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The LRT connection is an afterthought as designed. They knock out a wall to build a tunnel from the unpaid zone... originally the knock out was for servicing neighbouring properties if they developed hence the unpaid zone. They actually aren't even building the link in this project. When and if the Finch West LRT is built it would be entirely up to that project to fund the linkage. Maybe then they would be a bit more creative in how to build it.
Guess they don't want to create another Yonge ghost station for the Queen LRT subway.
 

interchange42

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It's Friday. Time to visit another station. This week: Finch West, designed, like Steeles West, by Will Alsop and Richard Stevens Architects.

Site Plan.




The Main Entrance, west side of Keele, north of Finch. Plan, Sylvan Eden Exterior, Bar Coded Interior, with accenting coloured glass panels.








The Concourse. Plan, future potential access to the Finch West LRT, interior view.








Platform. Plan, and interior view.






Back the the surface, east side of Keele, north end; the Bus Terminal. Plan, interior view, exterior view. A power substation will be located atop the terminal. The bus terminal plan is not finalized yet.








Artwork in the station is by Bruce McLean. From the TTC's report:

The Artist has worked very closely with the architectural design team to develop a concept of public art being fully integrated with the architecture and the structure so that it is woven into the very fabric of the station; physically supporting it to form a unified aesthetic language of design. The artist has stated:
“The sculptures are intended to be part of the structure and fabric of the building and should in a way be invisible. The structures supporting the power substation are referencing Greek caryatids; the pillars supporting the underground roof reference 6,000 year old Minorcan pillars supporting underground houses based, I believe, on the structure of a palm tree and are, I also believe, the inspiration for the form of the barrel vault, so in effect it’s making use of the ancient in modern times.”
The formal aspects of the artwork are comprised of strong sculptural concrete forms that are integrated into the supporting columns of the substation and entrance buildings, the bus canopy, and double-height columns below grade. Every visible aspect of the public space of this project is a blending of the boundaries between art and architecture.
How all of that relates to the design below, is somewhat of a mystery to me. Anyone have any guesses?

 

junctionist

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The way the art is going to integrated directly into the interior architecture suggests it may be like the Montreal Metro approach, where the architects and several artists seemed to strongly collaborate in designing each individual interior. The "art" isn't just some sculpture or mural (but may include that as well), but it becomes the custom finishes of the station, the one of a kind touches to the interior that can only result from a collaborative approach of artist and architect. It's an approach also seen at Spadina line stations like Dupont and Downsview. The best results tend to be when several artists are involved, though.
 

M II A II R II K

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There are many old subway systems in existence that appear to run through fields on their outer extensions. A way of pulling more people in from afar.

But at the same time one has to look at what Queen West or Parliament has in comparison.
 

gweed123

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There are many old subway systems in existence that appear to run through fields on their outer extensions. A way of pulling more people in from afar.

But at the same time one has to look at what Queen West or Parliament has in comparison.
While having density around suburban stations is nice, a lot of these stations are going to draw a significant percentage of their ridership from passengers transferring from surface routes.

Setting the surface routes up so that they can shuttle people to these stations effectively is a much bigger challenge, and a more important priority, than rezoning the surrounding lands to allow for higher density development. The density is the icing on the cake, not the cake itself.
 

junctionist

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There are many old subway systems in existence that appear to run through fields on their outer extensions. A way of pulling more people in from afar.

But at the same time one has to look at what Queen West or Parliament has in comparison.
It would be an interesting comparison because Queen West consistently has some of the highest population densities in the city, though its built form is thoroughly low rise. Many people assume that high density is only achieved with high-rise buildings. It's not achieved through sprawl, but it can be done with tightly built up low-rise and mid-rise buildings. There are aspects of high-rise development in the city that reduces the density achieved in a tower: large amenity spaces, private parkland, large podiums, above-ground parking facilities, and large driveways, for instance. In suburban areas, high-rise developments often include all of these features.
 

innsertnamehere

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its because queen west is lined with midrises behind the lowrises, and if that denisty figure includes king west, they line the main street.
 

drum118

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It would be an interesting comparison because Queen West consistently has some of the highest population densities in the city, though its built form is thoroughly low rise. Many people assume that high density is only achieved with high-rise buildings. It's not achieved through sprawl, but it can be done with tightly built up low-rise and mid-rise buildings. There are aspects of high-rise development in the city that reduces the density achieved in a tower: large amenity spaces, private parkland, large podiums, above-ground parking facilities, and large driveways, for instance. In suburban areas, high-rise developments often include all of these features.
If you look at Europe, you will find buildings ranging from 4-20 storey tall lining the main streets. These buildings are continues for the whole block length with no gaps between the various building considering most were not built at the same time. At the same time, very rare you see parking structures.

How many tall building do you see in the old Buda of Budapest looking from old Pest from the photos below?? Then there is the photo of the block where our hotel was located in Barcelona. I am not a fan of buildings in a park nor not connected to another building be side it. I love tall building, but we need to build mid-rises also with better podiums for the tall towers. These mid-rise will help to support this line.


 

Palma

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I do not see any 20 storey buildings in the photo. I don't know why Toronto seems to think it needs 20-90 storey buildings. Who gives approval for these tall structures as no one wants them. Europe does not have them but here they talk like its the only thing to do. Maybe, if they want to look like Asia but I think most would rather the city look more like a European city.
 

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