News   Apr 19, 2024
 1.2K     0 
News   Apr 19, 2024
 731     2 
News   Apr 19, 2024
 1.2K     3 

Toronto Crosstown LRT | ?m | ?s | Metrolinx | Arcadis

^Two other interesting tidbits in that chart

- Dufferin Dunn and Dowling bridges in 26-27 hints at timeframe for GO electrification, as I can't see the wires getting strung until those bridges are complete
- Good to see Eglinton East and Waterfront LRT on the list, but the cash flow extends a long way out

- Paul
Looking at those numbers, the city is spending shockingly little on capital investments in roads for the size of the roads network it maintains. That number should probably be 3-4x as much.

Probably not the right thread for that though.

Just a reminder that the chart is not what is funded; but what is not funded.

I have posted the complete funded list elsewhere; I believe in the Olivia Chow thread.
 
This is welcome news for the area

Road and Sidewalk Reinstatement at Eglinton Station​

As early as Friday, January 19, 2024​

a7371d7d-2db1-13be-6fca-aebe42a7fae1.png
What Work is Taking Place?
As early as Friday, January 19, 2024, crews at Eglinton Station will be implementing the final traffic configuration at the Yonge Street and Eglinton Avenue intersection. One lane of through traffic in each direction will be reinstated on Eglinton Avenue at Yonge Street and on Eglinton Avenue West at Duplex Avenue. One lane of through traffic in each direction will be reinstated on Duplex Avenue at Eglinton Avenue West. Two lanes of traffic in each direction will be reinstated on Yonge Street at Eglinton Avenue. Access to Holly Street from Eglinton Avenue East will be reinstated, and vice-versa.

The eastbound left turn lane from Eglinton Avenue West onto Duplex Avenue southbound will be restricted between 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. on Monday – Sunday, with police and TTC vehicles exempt. All turns at Yonge Street and Eglinton Avenue will remain restricted, with police and TTC vehicles exempt. The left turn from Holly Street onto Eglinton Avenue East westbound will be restricted. All sidewalks on Eglinton Avenue between Duplex Avenue and Holly Street will be reinstated (including Cowbell Lane). All sidewalks on Yonge Street between 2289 Yonge Street and 2200 Yonge Street will be reinstated. Traffic Control Personnel and/or a Paid Duty Officer will be present while the final configuration is being implemented. Following the implementation of this configuration, short term periodic lane reductions may be required to facilitate special activities.

What to Expect
The final traffic configuration will be implemented at Eglinton Station. All traffic lanes and sidewalks on Eglinton Avenue will be reinstated between Duplex Avenue and Holly Street (including Cowbell Lane). Access to Holly Street from Eglinton Avenue will be reinstated, and vice-versa. Traffic Control Personnel and/or a Paid Duty Officer will be present while the final configuration is being implemented.

HOURS OF WORK
•As early as Friday, January 19, 2024.
•Overnight work may be required while the final configuration is being implemented.
• Work may be rescheduled due to inclement weather or unforeseen circumstances.

TRAFFIC DETAILS
•The final traffic configuration at the Yonge Street and Eglinton Avenue will be implemented.
•One lane of through traffic in each direction will be reinstated on Eglinton Avenue at Yonge Street and on Eglinton Avenue West at Duplex Avenue.
•One lane of through traffic in each direction will be reinstated on Duplex Avenue at Eglinton Avenue West.
•Two lanes of traffic in each direction will be reinstated on Yonge Street at Eglinton Avenue.
•Access to Holly Street from Eglinton Avenue East will be reinstated, and vice-versa.
•The westbound left turn lane from Eglinton Avenue West onto Duplex Avenue southbound will be restricted between 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. on Monday – Sunday, with police and TTC vehicles exempt. •All turns at Yonge Street and Eglinton Avenue will remain restricted, with police and TTC vehicles exempt.
•The left turn from Holly Street onto Eglinton Avenue East westbound will be restricted.
•Following the implementation of this configuration, short term periodic lane reductions may be required to facilitate special activities.

PEDESTRIAN DETAILS
•All sidewalks on Eglinton Avenue between Duplex Avenue and Holly Street will be reinstated (including Cowbell Lane).
•All sidewalks on Yonge Street between 2289 Yonge Street and 2200 Yonge Street will be reinstated.

TRANSIT INFORMATION
• Access to TTC will be maintained at all times.
• Please visit www.ttc.ca for more information.
 
Yonge and Eglinton was still a huge mess on Monday. The sides of the roadway and bike lane were still a foot deep. Let's see if it actually open up on Friday.
 
do the cars have buttons on the outside to open the doors? if no then it will be subway style.

Since the LRVs used on the Crosstown and KWs LRT are from the same contract there is little difference between the trains, conceivably they will be identical. KWs LRVs have buttons on both the inside and outside, they also use the TTC chime.

I wonder if all the doors will automagically open whenever the vehicles stop on the surface stops.

It's not an issue for the underground section, but seems like a waste of energy and heat/cooling to open all doors outside if it's not required.

In KW the way it works really depends on the time of the year. When the LRT was up and running in 2019 the button on the doors always had to be pressed in order to open. Once COVID hit they quickly changed that so every door opened at each station regardless of how many passengers wanted to get on or off the LRV. Since then it has pretty much stayed the same however in the winter they tend to change it so you have to hit the buttons again. With how mild winter has been so far they didn't do it until this past week, it threw many people for a loop.
 
I don't really like the slow orders. However, they should matter much less for the surface section of ECLRT than for the legacy streetcars.

The intersections and the traffic lights are spaced much wider on that part of Eglinton than in downtown. And, about half of those intersections will have ECLRT stops, where the trains would have to slow down anyway.

In KW the same LRVs are used and the breaking on them is honestly quite amazing so it would be pretty absurd to have a slow order through intersections. In KW there are a few intersections where the LRVs always go slow but that is generally when the LRV is approaching a station or the transit signal has yet to change. There are many intersections where the LRVs don't slow down (much of King Street through midtown), often times when it goes through there it is matching the speed of traffic or going faster.
 
Since the LRVs used on the Crosstown and KWs LRT are from the same contract there is little difference between the trains, conceivably they will be identical. KWs LRVs have buttons on both the inside and outside, they also use the TTC chime.
Agree with everything you’re saying but I’ll just be a nerd and say that the Crosstown has a bunch of LRVs with single cabs, rather than all double cabs like ION. Exact same models otherwise!
 



Eglinton Crosstown LRT January, 2024​

e41624ae-2bc3-416a-94af-d153eaadb8c1.png

Testing the Guideway Intrusion Detection System (GIDS)​

Take a look at this behind the scenes video demonstrating how the Guideway Intrusion Detection System works.​

3cd63a68-cfa9-5d98-f500-7408a1ab4283.png

 
Yonge and Eglinton is a complete zoo while they try to restore the roadway. Traffic is sharing a single lane both directions with a signal person just east of Yonge.
 
My biggest gripe with the surface portion is that there are too many stops. The Aga Khan is a stop located right at the on & off ramps for the DVP. Why would a pedestrain get off the train here? Buses running along Eglinton should be adequate enough to fill in the gaps between LRT stations.

I'm currently in Calgary where the C-trains don't slow down at intersections. But instead of transit priority street lights, they have noisy rail crossing lights and arms that come down. It's a very utilitarian solution. Not exactly asthetic looking.
I'll take a practical solution to an aesthetic solution any day of the week. In fact Edmonton's push for "Signal-less intersections" as they're calling it frustrates me to no end.
I imagine that the drivers don't want to go fast. Having your streetcar involved in an accident likely means you'll get told off by your superiors, you''ll have to do paperwork, and you might get screwed over in scheduling. You might get transferred to buses. (The horror!) Why risk all of that just so that you can finish your route a few minutes faster?

From a commuter's perspective, I'd MUCH rather prefer that a streetcar/LRV is NOT involved in an accident, and if that means drivers drive more slowly, so be it. We don't want the whole line messed up because of a moron trying to beat an LRV through an intersection!
From most commuters' perspective, if the Streetcar/LRV isn't fast, then they'll take the car, especially if it isn't rush hour where traffic is a major concern. Don't forget that we live in a sprawling north american city/metro area where cars have a massive stranglehold over our daily lives. If transit isn't competitive with cars, it won't attract many riders, and to this day the car is king when speed is concerned, especially when traffic isn't a concern.
 

Back
Top