Casa | 148m | 46s | Cresford | architectsAlliance

casaguy

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It's a corner unit, and the balcony wraps around. So it's actually "L" shaped. 40' x 5' and 23' x 5'. So that's 200 sq. ft. + 115 sq. ft. = 315 sq. ft. The 40' x 28' referenced above are actually the outside lengths of each section of the "L". You have to subtract the 5' width from one of external dimensions (28-5=23) when calculating the area to avoid double counting the 5' x 5' square in the corner. I guess I could have been clearer, but I was so giddy at having discoverd extra square footage on the balcony that I wasn't thinking straight.
But if the length of the unit is 40 ft and the width is 23.5 feet, wouldn't that make the interior square footage 940 feet? (Not that I'm complaining about that!)

The exposed polished concrete ceilings are a good way to go (like in the original "Foglia" model suite) but I think that's also pricey, no?

I'll post pics soon of the 6th floor (pictures taken by a neighbour on the 8th floor next door)...

FYI, here as some pics I took of the model suite a couple of years ago...




 

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But if the length of the unit is 40 ft and the width is 23.5 feet, wouldn't that make the interior square footage 940 feet? (Not that I'm complaining about that!)

The exterior dimensions of the balcony are 40' x 28'. Subtract 5' from each to account for the balcony's depth to calculate the interior dimensions of the balcony (which would be the same as the exterior dimensions of the unit). That would be around 35' x 23' which equals 805 sq. ft. Very close to the stated 807 sq. ft. for the famous Foglia.
 

archetype

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Slightly more accurate: the LR is 21'4" and 2ndBR 9'11" long, with approximately 2'5" of closet space in between. That's a total of 33'8". Adding the 5' for the balcony would make it 38'8", so 40' is not a big stretch if you factor in the concrete between Foglia and Roma.

But the width is listed as 12' for the LR and 9' for the 1stBR, which, even if you add 1' for the concrete border between Foglia and Modena, you're still only at 22'. So, by my calculations, the general block is more of a 35' for the north (if you subtract 5' of balcony) and 22' for the west (not 23'). This adds up to 770 SF. Then you add the entrance (looks like 6 X 6) and you get 36 more SF for a total of 806, just one short.

The balcony wraparound at 5X5, 5X35, and 5X22 would add up to 315 SF, instead of the stated 237 on the floor plans. Good for us, but remember, although the depth of the balcony wasn't stated, it WAS actually 5' in the model suite, so we're getting exactly what we paid for. It's just that they got the calculations wrong on their drawings. In any case, a total of more than 1100SF of space is much better than 1044.:)
 

SP!RE

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Sexy interior... some day those suites are gonna be retro (in a good way) cuz they've really got a timeless quality to them.

I'm so excited about this sexy project!
 

casaguy

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Casa Condominium Progress, August 6, 2008

Still working on the 6th level. You can see the floor of the 7th level has begun on the south portion of the tower. (New photos "from above" are still to come.)

I hope these brick-layers know how awesome a job they're doing. They clearly take pride in their work.





^In the last 3 pics you can clearly see the skeleton for the Foglia unit (with the 2 circular pillars in the foreground).
 

ganjavih

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Always happy to see real brick being used... it's really a major part of the Toronto vernacular, and a nice contrast to all the glass going up everywhere.
 

archetype

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Hey folks, I'm really excited about this project but...while the standard finishes are decent, anyone wanting to upgrade should beware. The addendum to the agreement of purchase and sale has some sinister clauses. For example:

2c) "In addition to all other reasonable costs, additional charges may be made for professional fees incurred by the Vendor from its architects, engineers, etc., for the purpose of incorporating the Purchaser's change(s)".

*This sounds reasonable if one was moving walls and plumbing, but for cosmetic changes, it's not necessary, and the wording leaves purchasers vulnerable to added costs at the Vendor's discretion.

4. "If any of the upgrades ordered..remain incomplete in whole or in part on the closing date, the Vendor MAY provide an undertaking to complete the upgrades...or NOT provide the upgrades in its sole discretion, whereupon the Vendor shall refund the purchaser...that portion....AS DETERMINED BY THE VENDOR...with respect to the upgrades which were not provided or are incomplete".

* There are clauses that insist payment be made by a certain time. It therefore stands to reason, that upgrades not provided by a reasonable time should be subject to a full refund. In clause 4, the Vendor could conceivably install half the kitchen cabinets, and give you some money back (an amount up to them) for the remaining.

5. ...the Vendor is acting merely as agent of the various sub-trades with respect to such..changes and accordingly, such construction and/or installation...DOES NOT FALL within the provisions of the Agreement, and...IS NOT COVERED BY THE TARION WARRANTY CORPORATION.

* What!? This seems like a sneaky way to circumvent TARION obligations. Provide melamine standard cabinets. Sell upgrades. Avoid responsibility. :mad:
 

casaguy

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As mentioned many times before, Casa buyers should NOT get upgrades through Cresford unless you've got money to burn. Total rip off. Cresford is screwing themselves with these idiotic terms and prices. Further evidence that management are idiots.

Upgrade whatever you want at a reasonable price on your own terms later.
 

casaguy

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Always happy to see real brick being used... it's really a major part of the Toronto vernacular, and a nice contrast to all the glass going up everywhere.
Well, the lobby will be 4 storeys of glass sheets and the tower will be entirely glass... but the brick on the sides and the back of the podium is definitely a nice change.
 

archetype

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Casaguy, I appreciate the advice, and I definitely don't have money to burn. But the melamine kitchen provided doesn't do justice to the place, and at $6,000 for the glossy finish, it may actually be worth it if you compare ripping out the melamine and installing such a Scavolini from scratch. But what really pisses me off are the clauses, particularly about upgrades NOT BEING UNDER TARION protection. Who ever heard of this?

Plus, they can delay your move-in date if upgrades aren't done (without compensation for moving expenses), plus they reimburse a la carte if they decide something won't be finished. The prices are one thing, but the clauses are not acceptable. I'll either have them edited, or like you suggested, I ain't upgrading.
 

SpadinaBus

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Casaguy, I appreciate the advice, and I definitely don't have money to burn. But the melamine kitchen provided doesn't do justice to the place, and at $6,000 for the glossy finish, it may actually be worth it if you compare ripping out the melamine and installing such a Scavolini from scratch. But what really pisses me off are the clauses, particularly about upgrades NOT BEING UNDER TARION protection. Who ever heard of this?

Plus, they can delay your move-in date if upgrades aren't done (without compensation for moving expenses), plus they reimburse a la carte if they decide something won't be finished. The prices are one thing, but the clauses are not acceptable. I'll either have them edited, or like you suggested, I ain't upgrading.

Knowing friends who have bought a Cresford condo, their advice to anyone who listens is to NOT get any upgrades with Cresford period as if you do, your expectations on quality for the "upgrade" will not match what they actually deliver and you will change it out anyways out of frustration - ie. waste of money times two.

That clause about no Tarion protection is true and something which my lawyer recommended we get rid of in an ammendment during the 10 day off cooling period for my condo purchase.
 

dventura

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I have a stupid question.

Having never bought a condo before let alone watch one built, I am wondering why the expected occupancy is 1 year from now (realizing that's best case scenario) when the skeleton of the building should be completed in 9 months.

From what I understand that as the concrete structure reaches higher, the other teams work their way up ie the glass. Once the glass is in place the interior teams can work their way up doing to plumbing, electrical and interior finishes....correct? So while 3 months isn't that long...I would expect that if they are working their way up on all these things that they could completely finish the top floors off a month from when the structure is completed. Am I missing something? Are their other factors involved...is it because they wont be able to build a floor a week during the winter? Thanks in advance. (Not that I'm impatient, I'm just curious about the process)
 

Granny

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Having never bought a condo before let alone watch one built, I am wondering why the expected occupancy is 1 year from now (realizing that's best case scenario) when the skeleton of the building should be completed in 9 months.

From what I understand that as the concrete structure reaches higher, the other teams work their way up ie the glass. Once the glass is in place the interior teams can work their way up doing to plumbing, electrical and interior finishes....correct? So while 3 months isn't that long...I would expect that if they are working their way up on all these things that they could completely finish the top floors off a month from when the structure is completed. Am I missing something? Are their other factors involved...is it because they wont be able to build a floor a week during the winter? Thanks in advance. (Not that I'm impatient, I'm just curious about the process)
Hardly a dumb question or I'm asking the same dumb question (sort of)regarding my building going up. I am guessing that the last bit of concrete is poured on the top mechanical floor sometime in February. They have poured the 21'st floor and there are 34 floors including mechanical.Each floor is about 12 days, give or take. My unit is on a lower floor. I'm supposed to move in (I'm told) in Mid-March. I don't believe it. I figure AT LEAST another three months after the last bucket of concrete(assuming I guess right).
I wonder if there are a few members out there who have had actual experience with this?
 

dventura

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What building are you in that's taking 12 days per floor?

So I guess my question is: What work has to be done that takes at least 3 months once the last bucket is poured until move in? (assuming the glass panels and interiors are being completed up the building from the lower floors as the building rises)
 

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