8 Elm | 218.2m | 69s | Reserve Properties | IBI Group

Northern Light

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411 Church rocks. Not necessarily a better than / worse than situation, but it's certainly up there. I have high hopes for 55 Mercer too.

411's north elevation is decent, not sold on the west side.

The podium, near-grade/at grade has its problems.
 

3Dementia

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411 Church rocks. Not necessarily a better than / worse than situation, but it's certainly up there. I have high hopes for 55 Mercer too.

It's probably the safest bet in town to "have high hopes" with CentreCourt at the helm of so many good projects. We're lucky to have them.

As for my post.. "if I recall", another joke that didn't land (note to self: don't do subtle at UT).
 

Koops65

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Toronto Model 08-21-22 8 Elm.png
 

egotrippin

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Love it or hate it, Dundas Square does add energy to our downtown and is probably the most photographed spot in the city. I'm fine with one section of town being a crass, over the top, loud, sensory overload but it needs to be confined to Dundas Square.

If anything, we need to get rid of the tens of thousands of ghastly plastic garish retail signage that have ruined heritage buildings on every major artery in this city. And contrary to what some on UT think, that doesn't mean no signage. Retail managed to stay in business for decades with signage that was respectful of the building's architecture. 5ive Condos is a prime example of appropriate retail signage on heritage buildings.

Queen West, Dundas West, College, Bloor West, Church, Spadina, Danforth, etc. It's unbelievable (and sad) what Toronto has done to its old building stock ....although some seem to think criticizing the scarring/defacing of these buildings is tantamount to Toronto bashing. They think it looks great, I guess.
You're spot on about signage these days; those backlit plastic or cheap banner-style signs are a scourge. I actually wouldn't mind a little more brightness if signage was of a 1940s-1950s quality. The neon, hanging signs, and generally higher quality graphic work of that era made the city look alive without being garish. Dundas Square can continue being over the top, but the rest of the city definitely needs a signage overhaul.

375741_608538069216181_1595031251_n.jpg


There was such a vibrancy to the era, and while the 1950s onwards weren't necessarily know for being kind to heritage architecture, it was certainly more respectful than much of today's signage.
 

Northern Light

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You're spot on about signage these days; those backlit plastic or cheap banner-style signs are a scourge. I actually wouldn't mind a little more brightness if signage was of a 1940s-1950s quality. The neon, hanging signs, and generally higher quality graphic work of that era made the city look alive without being garish. Dundas Square can continue being over the top, but the rest of the city definitely needs a signage overhaul.

View attachment 422110

There was such a vibrancy to the era, and while the 1950s onwards weren't necessarily know for being kind to heritage architecture, it was certainly more respectful than much of today's signage.

Funny............. I don't disagree......in some respects............but I always wish to poke the balloon of generalization........

Look at this picture..........The very brightly lit Honest Eds is in the background............wait...........it's way over there........... right.........it hadn't yet been extended to Bathurst and swallowed all those buildings with the interesting signs yet, but it would, over the next 3 decades.

I just offer that one aspect of the nostalgia generated by this photo is the very thing that killed much what was great in this photo.

Of course, the Bloor subway line nixed the streetcars, and the cobblestone.
 

egotrippin

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Funny............. I don't disagree......in some respects............but I always wish to poke the balloon of generalization........

Look at this picture..........The very brightly lit Honest Eds is in the background............wait...........it's way over there........... right.........it hadn't yet been extended to Bathurst and swallowed all those buildings with the interesting signs yet, but it would, over the next 3 decades.

I just offer that one aspect of the nostalgia generated by this photo is the very thing that killed much what was great in this photo.

Of course, the Bloor subway line nixed the streetcars, and the cobblestone.
Good point re. Honest Ed's, the latter incarnation covered all the older buildings in ugly metal panels. Stone paving between streetcar tracks certainly helps too.
 

crumplescotch

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You're spot on about signage these days; those backlit plastic or cheap banner-style signs are a scourge. I actually wouldn't mind a little more brightness if signage was of a 1940s-1950s quality. The neon, hanging signs, and generally higher quality graphic work of that era made the city look alive without being garish. Dundas Square can continue being over the top, but the rest of the city definitely needs a signage overhaul.

View attachment 422110

There was such a vibrancy to the era, and while the 1950s onwards weren't necessarily know for being kind to heritage architecture, it was certainly more respectful than much of today's signage.

Isn't that the time when they levelled old city blocks and parks to build some parking lots and Gardiner Expressway?

dbd95897a389d5cbde726fc4861dabf1.jpg


Yeah, I don't think our generation can do anything worse than they already did...
 

egotrippin

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Also I was just talking about signage of the 1940/50s. I fully recognize the large scale destruction that happened in the mid-century and onwards.
 

AHK

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Press release issued today by Reserve Properties and Capital Developments. Obviously - some Toronto area condominium developments are still selling...

Reserve Properties and Capital Developments announce over 500 units sold at 8 Elm​


News provided by
Reserve Properties & Capital Developments

TORONTO, ON, Nov. 9, 2022 /CNW/ - In just over a month, more than 500 units have been sold at 8 Elm on Yonge, a project by Reserve Properties and Capital Developments. Launched at the end of September, extraordinarily high demand for the 69-storey mixed-use tower at Yonge and Dundas has led to the sale of over 500 of the 630 suites that were released to market. The new development was launched in collaboration with Hollywood actor, Simu Liu, who lent his creativity to the design process, including the suite interiors and amenity programming.

"The response to 8 Elm is a testament to the ongoing demand for living opportunities in prime neighbourhoods that are close to transit," says Shane Fenton, Chief Operating Officer, Reserve Properties. "In addition to having the best location in the city, we have received exceptionally positive feedback about the quality and efficiency of our suite designs. We are thrilled that our efforts were met with such enthusiasm."

"We are pleased to have achieved this milestone so quickly," says Jordan Dermer, Co-CEO and Co-Founder, Capital Developments. "Towers like 8 Elm do not come around often, so buyers were able to look around short-term economic uncertainty to the long-term appeal of owning in this location."

Located at Yonge and Elm Street, steps away from the bustling Yonge Dundas Square, 8 Elm will blur the lines between residential living and hospitality. A 26,000 square foot indoor and outdoor amenity program features a wrap-around terrace, fitness centre, social lounge, games room and a co-working space. On the fifty-sixth floor, residents have access to the Sky Club, a sophisticated hospitality-inspired amenity, akin to a private social club, with spectacular views of Toronto.

Architecture by IBI Group will see three heritage facades restored at grade, and a soaring tower defined by a glass reveal above the podium, creating a unique distinction from the heritage properties. With interiors by award winning design firm, Cecconi Simone, 8 Elm is inspired by New York's doorman buildings, striking the perfect balance between contemporary and traditional design through classic materials and rich textures.

8 Elm was launched in September 2022, with construction due to begin in Q1 of 2023.
 

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