64-86 Bathurst | 68.3m | 17s | Hines | 3XN

AlvinofDiaspar

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The planning docs are out:

http://app.toronto.ca/DevelopmentAp...4392531&isCofASearch=false&isTlabSearch=false

From the Architectural Plans:

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(Hines/3XN/Kirkor)

AoD
 

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mcornett

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It reads as a giant slab to me, much as I like the colours and use of pre-cast. An updated version of 70s apartment blocks.
 

ADRM

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It reads as a giant slab to me, much as I like the colours and use of pre-cast. An updated version of 70s apartment blocks.

I think that's right, but I'm not sure that's a bad thing if the design and materiality are executed well; I actually prefer this typology to the more squat and spread massing of Minto Westside down the street from here.
 

ProjectEnd

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It's a funny question - I've always thought the same but recently changed my tune (somewhat). The larger, wide-shallow units of mid-century buildings reflect not only the physical built form of the buildings but also different economic & construction realities. This isn't to say that developers were entirely altruistic, but merely that because high-rise living was new (both in lifestyle and typology), units had to be larger and better laid out to appeal and rent.

I really don't have any doubt that given a building of exactly the same dimensions as a mid-century slab, instead of getting, say, 12 units per floor with rectangular, wide-shallow layouts, we'd now be getting closer to 24 units, all in half-size squares.
 

innsertnamehere

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It's a funny question - I've always thought the same but recently changed my tune (somewhat). The larger, wide-shallow units of mid-century buildings reflect not only the physical built form of the buildings but also different economic & construction realities. This isn't to say that developers were entirely altruistic, but merely that because high-rise living was new (both in lifestyle and typology), units had to be larger and better laid out to appeal and rent.

I really don't have any doubt that given a building of exactly the same dimensions as a mid-century slab, instead of getting, say, 12 units per floor with rectangular, wide-shallow layouts, we'd now be getting closer to 24 units, all in half-size squares.
Oh I'm sure the units of today will be a lot smaller to match modern unit sizes - but a narrower slab building is inevitably going to create more natural light in units whether they are 500sf or 1,000sf. Those units will be square instead of rectangular sticking deep into the floorplate.

Toronto's housing crunch and strict planning regulations have allowed developers to build basically whatever type of floor space they can get approved, regardless of how crappy the units are for living. People are desperate to just have space. It's a very different economic reality than the 1960's.

Personally I have a soft spot for 1980-1990's units.. Still have that large scale but have more modern amenities like in unit laundry. Buildings are also typically in better shape.

Even units of 10 years ago are a lot more livable. I ended up renting where I am right now because my 1 bed unit was about 50-75sf bigger than brand new buildings while still providing similar amenities, for a building completed in 2007. Had I gone to a 1980's building it would likely have been 200sf larger.
 
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AlbertC

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http://www.joecressy.com/64_86_bathurst_street_community_consultation_meeting

The City is holding a Community Consultation meeting where you can learn more about the development application for 64-86 Bathurst St, ask questions and share your comments.

Date: Monday, June 3rd, 2019
Times: 5:30pm – 6:30pm: Open House
6:30pm – 8pm: Presentations and Q & A
Place: Fort York Visitor Centre – 250 Fort York Boulevard

Proposal
This application proposes a mixed-use rental apartment building with heights ranging from 20-storeys at the north portion of the site, to 17-storeys on the south portion. The proposal includes retail units on the ground floor, with two floors of office space above, and residential uses on floors 4-20. A total of 150 vehicular parking spaces and 374 bicycle parking spaces are proposed within 3 underground levels, which would be accessed off Wellington Street West.
 

Marcanadian

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Building reduced in height to 17 storeys; number of units down to 307 from 333.

Screen Shot 2019-12-03 at 8.24.26 AM.png


 

ADRM

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Building reduced in height to 17 storeys; number of units down to 307 from 333.

View attachment 218161


Did the stepping go away with the height reduction? Too bad if so.
 

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