News   Feb 28, 2024
 1.1K     1 
News   Feb 28, 2024
 1.5K     0 
News   Feb 28, 2024
 836     0 

Street Lighting

Hmm, those hew to an unusually warm glow for LEDs.......

They do seem quite bright, although that will amplified in this pic by the reflection of the snow.

The photos don’t really do them justice - I find them almost obnoxiously bright compared to the older bulbs.
 
The photos don’t really do them justice - I find them almost obnoxiously bright compared to the older bulbs.
From what we saw in St Lawrence, one problem is that when THSL installs new lights they put the poles in same locations. Here they replaced fairly (too) dim short lights with tall bright acorns. The result was that streets went from being a bit too dim to being VERY bright. Here the rationale was that the underground infrastructure required this, it should not be as necessary if the lights are fed by overhead wires.
 
From what we saw in St Lawrence, one problem is that when THSL installs new lights they put the poles in same locations. Here they replaced fairly (too) dim short lights with tall bright acorns. The result was that streets went from being a bit too dim to being VERY bright. Here the rationale was that the underground infrastructure required this, it should not be as necessary if the lights are fed by overhead wires.
No overhead wires, no trenching, if the city goes for solar-powered street lighting.

How Solar Powered Street Lighting Saves Your City Money

From link.

1594675925-image%20to%20fix.jpg


We're sure founding and developing a city is never an easy thing. Our hats go off to mayors, city planners, budget wizards, and other key figures in planning to find the best ways to support a city's operations. We'll leave the expert work up to you. However, we're doing meticulous research behind our doors in how to find the best ways to cut corners in energy spending for your city, and the good news is that we've slashed city budgets by several thousands of dollars in the past. We've got a secret in energy that can let your city prosper, and the answer is in using solar-powered street lighting.

No Trenching or Wiring Fees​

The second method that solar-powered street lighting uses to save you money is through being self-sufficient. As before, each solar light doesn't need connectivity to the main power grid, so that means project managers and city planners can skip paying the trenching, wiring, and labor fees altogether.

Trenching is extremely expensive. The price can vary by linear foot depending on what's nearby the project site, what condition the soil is in, and other factors. You'll need to rent the equipment and hire professionals for the labor. Then there are backfill fees as well.

Or, you could decide to switch to solar and skip all that hassle and expense.

The average price percentage saved for the total price of a lighting project, from the initial quote to the first night of operation, is typically 20%, but some projects can go as high as even 45%, depending on the needs of the project.

advantages-of-solar-street-lights-1623829907.jpg


Advantages of solar street lights


From link.

The use of solar power for illuminating streets and other public places is getting popular day by day. It has become a dependable source of lighting streets around the globe. There are multiple benefits of using solar street lighting fixtures, like conservation of energy, use of a conventional source of energy, and less dependence on the national grid. Tropical countries that receive ample sunlight most time of the year can be highly benefited from this source of light.

These days, outdoor solar lighting solutions are powered by an in-built battery, PV panels, smart sensors, LED lights, everything integrated into one compact unit. This form of lighting option has become an environment-friendly and cost-effective way of lighting streets and public places.

As much as solar energy is a cost-effective option for lighting, using LEDs with solar light becomes a super saver combo. LED lights are long-lasting, maintenance-free, and known for energy conservation. These specifications of solar LED luminaires are perfect for lighting-up roads, streets, parks, etc.

Advantages of solar-powered outdoor lights​


As infrastructure facilities around the world are getting stronger, the usage of modern solar street luminaries is increasing rapidly. It is because these lights come with inbuilt lithium-ion batteries, embedded solar panel, night and motion sensors, battery management system and automatic controls.

Some other notable benefits of solar street luminaires are mentioned in the pointers noted below:

● Solar street lights are water-resistance and weatherproof and have a low glare and low insect attrition rate.

● The solar panels in these lights convert solar energy into electrical energy that gets stored in the inbuilt battery and is utilized for dusk-to-dawn lighting operations.

● The main feature of contemporary solar street luminaires is the battery management system which aids the presence of motion and night sensors.

● In the first five hours of the night, the performance of the system is up to medium-level brightness. The intensity of light decreases progressively until dawn or till the time the PIR sensor is activated by the movement of humans.

● With a smart lighting option, it automatically turns on to full brightness when it senses human movement within a specific radius of the luminaire.

● In comparison to conventional street lights, solar outdoor luminaires require almost no maintenance.

These unmatchable and smart features of solar LED street lights allow people to rely on this type of luminaires.
 
The angle of the solar panels should slide the snow off, and the dark colour would absorb the sun's heat. Hopefully, the batteries will last more than 24 hours.
Because snow doesn't accumulate on black angled roof tops already. These would only work in desert climates. And you would be still required to have the lights plugged into the grid. If they don't get enough power from solar energy they need back up power from the grid. So you saved no money, just made a lamppost overly complicated.
 
Because snow doesn't accumulate on black angled roof tops already. These would only work in desert climates. And you would be still required to have the lights plugged into the grid. If they don't get enough power from solar energy they need back up power from the grid. So you saved no money, just made a lamppost overly complicated.

Does Solar Lighting Hold Up in Winter?

From link.

We’re sure there’s a concern for how solar lights might operate during wintertime. The sun doesn’t shine as often, and expensive equipment in freezing temperatures is bound to be a concern for whoever is purchasing the lights. As much as there might be cause for concern with solar light panels in sub-zero temperatures, fret not! Solar lighting equipment is specially designed so that it doesn't warp easily from temperature fluctuations. Plus, fixtures are IP65 rated, so water doesn't seep into the sensitive components from the snow that might build up on the panel. The IP (Ingress Protection) 5 rating protects against rain and snow.

Many of our light panels are tilted to ease the rolloff of snow, so even during a nasty winter storm, the solar LED lights won’t likely gather piles of snow and damage the installation. Even if snow piles up on the solar panel, a quick tap with a broom handle or similar object will knock it loose (just be sure nothing's below the snow as it falls).

Worried about low temperatures on batteries? If you’re concerned about the effect of drastic temperature changes on the batteries that house the converted solar energy, we have options to bury them to prevent volatile temperature fluctuations. Just be aware the typical lifespan of the batteries used is about 5-7 years, so if you opt to bury the battery to protect it from snow, replacing it will take a little more work. However, the batteries will be out of sight and protected in their installation boxes where the weather is less of a concern.

We considered all kinds of climate when designing our lights--they are meant to take a beating and keep on shining.

Less Light, Permanent Night?​

We don’t need to tell you there’s less sunlight in winter, nor do we need to tell you that less sunlight can affect solar lighting in winter. That’s a simple, clear fact to everyone, so it’s intuitive to think that solar-powered devices don’t function well during the darkest months. Well, we thought ahead again and ensured our product contradicts a lot of the worries about solar. Here’s how:

Even in rain-heavy localities with a near-permanent overcast cloud, current solar technologies are still capable of culling light. Our solar panels rate at 50 percent as efficient when light struggles to break through the clouds. That’s not all: in developing our product, we decided to include some of the heftiest batteries on the market—batteries that will keep our solar lights running for up to 14 days. That’s right, even without constant sunlight during the darkest times of the month, our solar lights will operate for a fortnight. Rest assured that light will be around when there isn’t any—unless the sun dies out, but that's probably the least of everyone's concerns right now.

In addition to larger batteries that give two weeks of autonomy, every solar lighting system is designed by qualified engineers that know how to combat against dark skies. Every system is designed with calculated sun hours in mind on the winter solstice, the darkest day of the year. The sun hour calculation gives us the proper foundation of how to properly design a solar light, so if the sun is blocked by heavy winter clouds, your lights will continue to shine every night, all week long.

Proper Light Means Proper Solar Panel Configuration​

The idea behind solar is we want to maximize potential energy gain on a daily basis. During the course of a year, the sun follows a different path every day. The sun sheds light differently on the planet during the winter months, so what’s the best practice with gathering the energy from the sun?

Our solar light panels are customizable to any angle! Follow the sun’s path to ensure the top efficiency for each of your panels. Not sure what angle you need? We’ve got people that can calculate the proper angle and help you determine where to face the panels to ensure power is maximally delivered to your new solar installation. Solar lighting during winter isn't a problem if you have the proper equipment with the proper configuration.

We could go on about why our solar lighting systems work in winter, but we’ve given you the main three points. Just remember, we have a combined span of 3 decades of work in solar. If you’re in the market to save some green, we specialize in that. If you’re in the market to go green, we specialize in that too. Just keep in mind that solar light fixtures aren’t just for when the sun is out, they’re built to last several years through thick and thin, light and dark, cold and hot. Find out the easy way what makes us one of the most trusted brands in solar. Browse our customer case studies or contact us if you have any questions. Have an energy-filled, wonderful day.

PS. They currently use solar panels for parking meters, red-light cameras, and speed cameras.
 
I found this thread insightful as to the challenges involved in building integrated lighting/hydro poles in Toronto:


I must say I walk away feeling even more upset with Toronto’s conservatism. Sometime a willingness to get over your skis just a bit and try something can unlock good results, and few of the hypothetical downsides.
 
I found this thread insightful as to the challenges involved in building integrated lighting/hydro poles in Toronto:


I must say I walk away feeling even more upset with Toronto’s conservatism. Sometime a willingness to get over your skis just a bit and try something can unlock good results, and few of the hypothetical downsides.

Same issues w/snow melt systems, shared ducts /infra for fibre, daylighting creeks (where sufficient land is already public), retail in public transit, select, good food offerings in parks...

Its always can't do, need a custom solution here, can't copy others who have done it successfully.

***

To be fair, there are exceptions to the above, where we have pockets of innovative, forward-thinking staff (my favourite is always TPL) ....

But we need a lot more of them, and a lot fewer complacent naysayers.
 
I recently had a few conversations with a waterfront planner who works for the city. Not all of this is relevant but here's some interesting news...
1. The Lower Yonge public realm will, as of now, have a modified version of the cobras instead of the intended signature waterfront street light. Planning, thankfully, managed to convince Transportation Services to include paleo-tech pavers, with some technical changes that won't be noticeable at street-level. Planning has been unsuccessful in its negotiations but will keep pushing to change this.
2. We talked about the need for a comprehensive public realm design standard for the Port Lands and the ongoing pushback from Toronto Hydro regarding non-Cobra street lights. He highly preferred the original signature lights used on Queens Quay and talked extensively about his dislike of cobra street lights and the outdated acorns.
3. The following change has been made to the Port Lands OPM as part of a settlement at the OLT...
  • 3.1 Ensure land use across the Port Lands and associated development is diverse with beautifully designed buildings, and, where appropriate, capable of adaptive reuse; and exemplifies excellence in design and the use of materials;
I was interested in what that could mean. Aside from our calls, he gave me this detailed response through email...
Policy 3.1 is an objective for Port Lands revitalization that specifies that land use and development is diverse, beautifully designed and capable of adaptive reuse. The term "beautifully designed" can be interpreted in a number of ways and was determined to be somewhat subjective.

This objective was proposed to be further clarified and refined, with a focus on diverse development and excellence in design and use of materials, which is consistent with Waterfront Toronto's and the City's objective of upholding excellence in design and setting new standards of architectural design and public space. The change in terminology will not have an impact on the Port Lands development achieving the objective of high standards of design excellence which have defined the waterfront.

Staff recommended that reference to adaptive reuse can be removed due to the policy guidance on adaptive reuse of buildings and materials included within Section 6: Built Form and Section 12.0: Sustainability, as well as the Toronto Green Standard. Adaptive reuse, where possible, will also define redevelopment and revitalization in the Port Lands, including the many listed heritage buildings that contribute to the industrial history and identity of the Port Lands.

City and Waterfront Toronto staff are committed to ensuring design excellence in architectural expression and urban design, providing guidance and direction on both public and private development and public realm projects as they evolve through the design and approval process. The Waterfront Design Review Panel reviews all projects in the Central Waterfront and Port Lands, with the the objective of upholding the high architectural standards and design excellence that define the waterfront. They provide comments and advice, as well as support for projects as they move through the approval process.

4. We talked about how great it would be to have greater direction for, at the very least, a diverse yet coherent architectural language for the Port Lands.
5. The Lakeshore project was to use the signature waterfront street light but Toronto Hydro shot it down so they're only used as pedestrian lights.
6. The Port Lands OPM appeal process is going surprisingly well and the upcoming hearing will be the last one; one that'll decide on all issues, from urban design to affordable housing.

7. We spoke a lot about Toronto's broken public realm process... one where departments & agencies operate in silos and City Planning has to fight tooth-and-nail, project-by-project, one where standards are poor and ineffective, one where maintenance is poor and replacement parts turn beautiful places ugly. City Planning's 2022 Work Plan includes an item called "Building Better Streetscapes".
Surprise surprise... they'll be fixing all of these issues. They will create new public realm standards for the entire city (including paving, lighting, and other elements), will rein in departments and agencies (including Toronto Hydro) to follow them in every project, will ensure developments and their POPS work together with the public realm to create a coherent and beautiful pedestrian experience, and, thank god, replace the cobras and acorns with something new.
It will be very comprehensive and the ideal is to cover every element that makes up our public realm across many different players. Hallelujah!
8. I suggested a modified, more elegant acorn for older parts of the city, a variant of the St. Clair / West Don Lands contemporary light for newer areas, the original signature waterfront street light for all areas of the waterfront, greater use of Victorian roadway & pedestrian lights, and a new city-wide pedestrian light to replace the Type II.

I'll update you guys with more details in the coming weeks!

:):):)
 
Last edited:
I recently had a few conversations with a waterfront planner who works for the city. Not all of this is relevant but here's some interesting news...
1. The Lower Yonge public realm will, as of now, have a modified version of the cobras instead of the intended signature waterfront street light. They, thankfully, managed to convince Transportation Services to include paleo-tech pavers, with some technical changes that won't be noticeable at street-level. Planning has been unsuccessful in its negotiations but will keep pushing to change this.
2. We talked about the need for a comprehensive public realm design standard for the Port Lands and the ongoing pushback from Toronto Hydro regarding non-Cobra street lights. He highly preferred the original signature lights used on Queens Quay and talked extensively about his dislike of cobra street lights and the outdated acorns.
3. The following change has been made to the Port Lands OPM as part of a settlement at the OLT...
  • 3.1 Ensure land use across the Port Lands and associated development is diverse with beautifully designed buildings, and, where appropriate, capable of adaptive reuse; and exemplifies excellence in design and the use of materials;
I was interested in what that could mean. Aside from our calls, he gave me this detailed response through email...


4. We talked about how great it would be to have greater direction for, at the very least, a diverse yet coherent architectural language for the Port Lands.
5. The Lakeshore project was to use the signature waterfront street light but Toronto Hydro shot it down so they're only used as pedestrian lights.
6. The Port Lands OPM appeal process is going surprisingly well and the upcoming hearing will be the last one; one that'll decide on all issues, from urban design to affordable housing.

7. We spoke a lot about Toronto's broken public realm process... one where departments & agencies operate in silos and City Planning has to fight tooth-and-nail, project-by-project, one where standards are poor and ineffective, one where maintenance is poor and replacement parts turn beautiful places ugly. City Planning's 2022 Work Plan includes an item called "Building Better Streetscapes".
Surprise surprise... they'll be fixing all of these issues. They will create new public realm standards for the entire city (including paving, lighting, and other elements), will rein in departments and agencies (including Toronto Hydro) to follow them in every project, will ensure developments and their POPS work together with the public realm to create a coherent and beautiful pedestrian experience, and, thank god, replace the cobras and acorns with something new.
It will be very comprehensive and the ideal is to cover every element that makes up our public realm across many different players. Hallelujah!
8. I suggested a modified, more elegant acorn for older parts of the city, a variant of the St. Clair / West Don Lands contemporary light for newer areas, the original signature waterfront street light for all areas of the waterfront, greater use of Victorian roadway & pedestrian lights, and a new city-wide pedestrian light to replace the Type II.

I'll update you guys with more details in the coming weeks!

:):):)
Though I would applaud your statement that "City Planning's 2022 Work Plan includes an item called "Building Better Streetscapes". I am extremely doubtful that they will successfully address most (or even any) of the issues. The City has a very well thought-out Streetscape Manual that bears VERY little resemblance to reality and, if Toronto Hydro are to be believed, the lighting sections of it were developed without involving THSL at all. I have sat at far too many meetings with Hydro and the City and seen the silos in action (or, rather, inaction.) Unless these discussions are supported at the highest City levels (bureaucrats and politicians) and the senior levels of Hydro etc they will be equally 'pie in the sky'. The City Planning 2022 Work Plan does not specifically mention this, as far as I can see, which is hardly encouraging! See: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ph/bgrd/backgroundfile-174785.pdf CORRECTION: It's on page 25 as one of a whole shopping list!
 
Though I would applaud your statement that "City Planning's 2022 Work Plan includes an item called "Building Better Streetscapes". I am extremely doubtful that they will successfully address most (or even any) of the issues. The City has a very well thought-out Streetscape Manual that bears VERY little resemblance to reality and, if Toronto Hydro are to be believed, the lighting sections of it were developed without involving THSL at all. I have sat at far too many meetings with Hydro and the City and seen the silos in action (or, rather, inaction.) Unless these discussions are supported at the highest City levels (bureaucrats and politicians) and the senior levels of Hydro etc they will be equally 'pie in the sky'. The City Planning 2022 Work Plan does not specifically mention this, as far as I can see, which is hardly encouraging! See: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ph/bgrd/backgroundfile-174785.pdf

'Building Better Streetscapes' is in fact in the document you're liking to above, see p.25
 

Back
Top