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Restaurant Comings & Goings

AlbertC

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AlvinofDiaspar

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the nature of land economics means that those with the most economic means will be the last to be priced out. Make more room for them, and those below them have more room too.
Is property taxes the best - or even fair - way to drive this process though? It's one thing for the property owner to say the land is worth more to me to redevelop to a more intensive use; it's another for the state to use its powers to drive that process through valuation.

so redevelop.
Whoop-de-do, cry me a river. We are in a housing crisis.
If one is serious about dealing with the housing crisis, it'd be tackling the yellow belt - instead of expecting what, 5% of the land area to handle housing pressures of the entire city. But of course, single families getting booted out of detached housing is whoop-de-do. Now that's something to cry me a river about.

AoD
 
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Towered

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Is property taxes the best - or even fair - way to drive this process though? It's one thing for the property owner to say the land is worth more to me to redevelop to a more intensive use; it's another for the state to use its powers to drive that process through valuation.



If one is serious about dealing with the housing crisis, it'd be tackling the yellow belt - instead of expecting what, 5% of the land area to handle housing pressures of the entire city. But of course, single families getting booted out of detached housing is whoop-de-do. Now that's something to cry me a river about.

AoD
Yes, something needs to be done about the sacred yellow belt, but what? Our elected officials are held hostage by homeowners.
 
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innsertnamehere

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Is property taxes the best - or even fair - way to drive this process though? It's one thing for the property owner to say the land is worth more to me to redevelop to a more intensive use; it's another for the state to use its' powers to drive that process through valuation.



If one is serious about dealing with the housing crisis, it'd be tackling the yellow belt - instead of expecting what, 5% of the land area to handle housing pressures of the entire city. But of course, single families getting booted out of detached housing is whoop-de-do. Now that's something to cry me a river about.

AoD
It is but one of a litany of tools needed to tackle it. Certainly far from the only.

Property taxes are a good way of combating people "sitting" on land. It forces them to look to develop. If land is wholly owned, the only carrying costs are property taxes.. and when it costs nothing to own land (or very little), there is no financial incentive to maximize its value beyond looking for a return. People are a lot more motivated when they see their bank account shrinking.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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Property taxes are a good way of combating people "sitting" on land. It forces them to look to develop. If land is wholly owned, the only carrying costs are property taxes.. and when it costs nothing to own land (or very little), there is no financial incentive to maximize its value beyond looking for a return. People are a lot more motivated when they see their bank account shrinking.
Of course it is a good tool - it might even be a legitimate policy tool even. But is it morally defensible when you have written off vast tracks of the city as sacrosanct and then expect the remainder to carry the weight? I'd argue not. I mean, let's do an economic output analysis of say this property and a similar sized property in a proximate site in the yellow belt. I mean, just who is sitting on the land, really?

AoD
 

innsertnamehere

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Of course it is a good tool - it might even be a legitimate policy tool even. But is it morally defensible when you have written off vast tracks of the city as sacrosanct and then expect the remainder to carry the weight? I'd argue not. I mean, let's do an economic output analysis of say this property and a similar sized property in a proximate site in the yellow belt. I mean, just who is sitting on the land, really?

AoD
 

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