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Post: City to sell old street signs at $10/ea

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Long Island Mike

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Everyone: this is an interesting topic-I have been interested somewhat in TO's street signs since my first trip there in 1979. Does anyone have a contact address or an E-Mail equivalent? i remember the "acorn" signs well myself-are they made of porcelain enamel? if they are they are well worth $10!
The new signs-as posted by SPM seem to me too expensive-I can picture them posted in the prime areas of the city but not in more marginal areas. Does anyone have photos of street signs in what was the other five boroughs of Toronto? The signs I recall that quickly come to mind are the light-box types downtown along Yonge Street-are those still there?
I will vouch myself for the info on the City Of Chicago store-I have purchased signs for my personal collection there myself. I think it is neat that the City will allow this-it allows collectors to acquire used signs LEGALLY-that's the key! Long Island Mike
 

junctionist

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What happened to this idea? I never heard anything after the initial news coverage. Is there actually a website? I did a Google search, but nothing came up. I really want to buy some signs.
 

Hipster Duck

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I remember the rationale for replacing the street signs as being that they cost approximately $50 less than the old Acorn signs and the Clearview font is easier to read, according to the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

The second justification makes some sense: if street signs need replacing, you might as well make it in a more legible font (this despite the fact that the old street signs were perfectly legible - especially for pedestrians - and did not indicate a hazard or risk for road users like 'Watch for Children' or something like that).

The first reason is pretty shortsighted. Even if 10,000 signs get replaced a year (impossible), for an added cost of $500,000, it's well worth it. Those old signs not only had character but they were iconic to Toronto. In this city that desperately tries to spend money to market itself and find things that are unique about itself to broadcast to the world, it takes the things that actually provide symbolism and meaning and throws them in the trash.

I would have been much more supportive if they would have kept on making the old (not the new, cartoony flat versions) acorn signs but with Clearview lettering than if they would have replaced them with these clinical blue signs.
 

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