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New Ontario Building Code Impact on Condo Design

To me I want the light in the morning as it helps me wake up

As do I. But it was never an issue. Enough light poured in through the glass doors, so it wasn't that bad.

The only thing I missed was being able to look out the window from my bed, and my place at the Met had an incredible view from my bed. When I moved to CityPlace, my bedroom had a balcony, so the view was obstructed again. That's when I started appreciating the inner bedroom idea, as my second bedroom in that unit was an inner room with glass doors. You didn't hear sounds from the street in that room, and it was much warmer than the master bedroom. As long as the room isn't up at the front of the unit, natural light isn't much of an issue.
 
In 2011, the NEC changed the electrical code. Switches controlling line-to-neutral lighting loads must have a neutral provided at the switch location. In other words, a 3-wire cable should run between light and switch.

Not valid in new circuits:
switch_loop.gif


Valid in new circuits:
switch_loop_new.gif


This is still valid:
single_switch.gif


The reason for the neutral wire is for new automated or wifi switches which need the neutral wire to function.
23639d1281316331-question-about-neutral-wire-through-wall-switch-insteon-wiring-diagram.jpg


From this link.

Of course, both ground and neutral wires eventually meet in the service panel. However, it may not work because of ground fault interrupters, and is not legal to ground the neutral wire in the junction box. Better to go with 3-wire cables, in new circuits.
 
Slightly OT, but hopefully the Building Code will require these for new construction in the not too far distant future:

http://www.citymetric.com/horizons/coming-soon-skyscrapers-glazed-solar-panels-1373

In Isreal, rooftop solar water heaters have been mandated for all new construction since 1980. I'm surprised mandatory rooftop solar isn't even on the radar here (especially given that Ontario is emerging as a major player in the worldwide solar industry).
 
Slightly OT, but hopefully the Building Code will require these for new construction in the not too far distant future:

http://www.citymetric.com/horizons/coming-soon-skyscrapers-glazed-solar-panels-1373

In Isreal, rooftop solar water heaters have been mandated for all new construction since 1980. I'm surprised mandatory rooftop solar isn't even on the radar here (especially given that Ontario is emerging as a major player in the worldwide solar industry).


Maybe because it would be frozen for 8 months a year?
 
Solar panels still produce energy in the winter, although significantly less than in the summer (IIRC, it has more to do with the sun being lower in the sky and the days being shorter, than it does with the cold). Solar-powered water heaters would still arguably be of significant benefit, although perhaps not as a mandatory measure.
 
"Solar panels still produce energy in the winter,"

Solar water heaters and photo-voltaic panels are not the same thing.
 
Meanwhile that sunbelt nation, Germany, got 6.9% of its power from solar last year.

Meanwhile, in Toronto, the difference between solar water heating and photovoltaic panels is clearly lost on most.
 
Okay, so it's solar thermal - which also works in winter, although again as stated above, significantly less than in summer. My conclusion is unchanged.

Wonder why those with solar water heaters in Toronto drain them during the winter?
 
Meanwhile, in Toronto, the difference between solar water heating and photovoltaic panels is clearly lost on most.

Well given that I'm putting up a 10kW solar system on my house right now (which, btw, will pay for itself in 5-6 years), I'm pretty sure the distinction isn't so fine as to be lost on me. All I'm saying is that it's simply a matter of time before thin cell solar technology is everywhere, cars, skycraper glass, etc. Other jurisdictions (including those with comparable climates) have taken bigger strides with rooftop solar. Given that Ontario is a world leader in photovoltaics (ie. Canadian Solar), it ought to take more of a lead on this issue.
 

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