News   Jan 18, 2022
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Metrolinx: Finch West LRT

yoshirocks702

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I didn't think they were burying the whole corridor, but I could be wrong. On another wire note, no pics but the Poles for the LRT overhead wires are in place on decent chunk from Yorkgate to about tobermory on my drive last night
 

W. K. Lis

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Burying utility wires is just one 'tool' to get the job done of keeping commercial areas vibrant and revitalizing those that aren't. It's not a prerequisite or the key ingredient, but it helps. The Junction saw significant revitalization after the hydro wires were buried on Dundas Street West.

St. Clair West saw a revitalization with its streetscape overhaul, which included burying the overhead hydro wires along most of the route. Almost all parts of Bloor, the Danforth, and Yonge Street have buried overhead wires and vibrant retail areas, as well.
They did not bury the overhead lines along Roncesvalles Avenue, because Mayor Rob Ford wanted to save money, or as he called it, "gravy". (The family's usual excuse.)
 

Amare

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It makes sense to bury what can be buried from a weather proofing standpoint. A good windstorm or ice storm won't take down infrastructure that isn't there.
It comes with it's tradeoffs. Sure if you bury infrastructure you'll have less issues with wind/ice storms. But keep in mind that if you suffer from large amounts of damage due to let's say a flood, the damage will be far more extensive/expensive and the repairs/downtime will be much greater with underground electric corridors.

If one is has their power cut off for days due to a tree falling on power lines/overhead streetcar lines, that outage would easily extend for weeks at a minimum with underground electric infrastructure.
 

junctionist

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It comes with it's tradeoffs. Sure if you bury infrastructure you'll have less issues with wind/ice storms. But keep in mind that if you suffer from large amounts of damage due to let's say a flood, the damage will be far more extensive/expensive and the repairs/downtime will be much greater with underground electric corridors.

If one is has their power cut off for days due to a tree falling on power lines/overhead streetcar lines, that outage would easily extend for weeks at a minimum with underground electric infrastructure.

Do you have a source? Underground power lines are specially designed to resist damage in flooding events. This link provides some interesting information in this regard.
 

Amare

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Do you have a source? Underground power lines are specially designed to resist damage in flooding events. This link provides some interesting information in this regard.
Remember Hurricane Sandy which slammed New York? That wasnt even a hurricane when it hit New York City but it still crippled it's infrastructure, a lot of which is underground.

But in any case, we're beating on a dead horse issue; here's a read for those who want to read on the various benefits/detriments of overhead vs. underground power lines:



 

Steve X

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Remember Hurricane Sandy which slammed New York? That wasnt even a hurricane when it hit New York City but it still crippled it's infrastructure, a lot of which is underground.

But in any case, we're beating on a dead horse issue; here's a read for those who want to read on the various benefits/detriments of overhead vs. underground power lines:



Most of the damage done by a hurricane is not the wind. Depending on what side of the storm hits the city, they might even avoid the deadly wind side of the storm. Storm surge and the rain is the major problem. The remnants of Ida mixed with another system caused a huge rainstorm that drowned people in basements a month ago. There was no wind there. If flooding consists and these electrical vaults are under water, how can it be even possible to repair them?

Also a larger size weaker hurricane would do more damage than a stronger but tiny hurricane. The wind field stretching more than 200km wide of tropical storm wind would do a lot more damage than a concentrated 40km wide wind field. That is not usually reported by the media as the only focus on category level. Next is the speed the storm moves. If the storm stalls, it'll just dump tons of rain while blowing high winds for more than a day while a speedy storm zooms pass the city in hours. So you can't really just say getting hit by a category 1 hurricane vs getting hit by a tropical storm makes a big difference.
 

crs1026

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Do you have a source? Underground power lines are specially designed to resist damage in flooding events. This link provides some interesting information in this regard.

Underground cables may imply underground substations, and they are a different story. There have been a couple of these in recent years in central Etobicoke.… with extra long outages.

- Paul
 

Steve X

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Underground cables may imply underground substations, and they are a different story. There have been a couple of these in recent years in central Etobicoke.… with extra long outages.

- Paul
That reminds me of that transform that shorted out on my street during that flash flood of 2013
 

allengeorge

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Interesting - I don’t think there were any underground transformer blowouts in NYC as a result of Ida. Maybe they hardened their infrastructure to deal with floods?
 

Amare

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Interesting - I don’t think there were any underground transformer blowouts in NYC as a result of Ida. Maybe they hardened their infrastructure to deal with floods?
Simple answer, nope and they are still paying the price for it today:


Let's hope all the conduits they are building under the guideway on Finch will be resilient to any kind of flooding issues.
 

allengeorge

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Simple answer, nope and they are still paying the price for it today:


Let's hope all the conduits they are building under the guideway on Finch will be resilient to any kind of flooding issues.
The article was from Sandy. Ida happened a month ago. Didn’t read that ConEd had cut power to anyone, but admittedly, NYC is very large, and power cuts are probably on a block-by-block basis.
 

allengeorge

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Found the Ida numbers.

Honestly, 32000 customers for some of the worst flooding since Sandy is…pretty damn good, considering that all of NYC’s power lines are underground.
 

Northern Light

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Found the Ida numbers.

Honestly, 32000 customers for some of the worst flooding since Sandy is…pretty damn good, considering that all of NYC’s power lines are underground.

For contrast, I have a transformer substation just a block or two from me, and I hear an explosion there, sometimes associated with a power failure, sometimes just a flicker several times per year.

Ice build up is a huge issue in winter; lightning is an issue in the warmer months, but so are squirrels and raccoons and other creatures getting into and chewing on the equipment, typically to their detriment.

Its all trade-offs; but on the whole, undergrounding typically results in greater reliability/resiliency.


From the above:

1633054011256.png


Lots more detailed info at the linked page!
 

Amare

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The article was from Sandy. Ida happened a month ago. Didn’t read that ConEd had cut power to anyone, but admittedly, NYC is very large, and power cuts are probably on a block-by-block basis.
For some reason I was thinking of a 2001 storm, ive got to get some coffee in me clearly.
 

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