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Maximum number of elevators?

Wooba

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#1
I'm living in a new condo that's still partially under construction. We've got a real issue during the day with trades using the elevators and having to wait ages. We have 3 elevators but one of them has not been working for a couple of weeks. One of my neighbours told me that when she complained to the superintendant she was told that Ontario law does not allow 3 elevators to be running until a certain amount of the building is occupied. That sounds like a load of doo doo to me, but I'm no expert so can anyone shed any light on this? I'd estimate the building is around 60% occupied.
 
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#2
From this link:

High building fire safety concerns

High buildings are designed to be fire-safe. But, because they may contain many people, and because of the building's tremendous size, emergency response is challenging with significant potential for major incidents.

Due to equipment limitations, firefighters cannot rescue people from an outside balcony or window above the seventh floor. Also, a rooftop helicopter rescue is too dangerous. Firefighters must do interior firefighting and rescue tactics.
If one is concerned about safety, do not select a suite above the seventh floor. In addition, as one gets older in age, get a suite on the seventh floor or lower, so that you might have to walk down (or up) in case the elevators go out of commission.
 

rbt

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#3
From this link:

If one is concerned about safety, do not select a suite above the seventh floor. In addition, as one gets older in age, get a suite on the seventh floor or lower, so that you might have to walk down (or up) in case the elevators go out of commission.
This made be curious about fire fatalities by building type. Hard to find anything Ontario specific.

The best I could find was a document from the US which shows spread in high-rise apartments is significantly lower than "not high-rise apartments".
http://www.nfpa.org/news-and-resear...res-by-property-type/high-rise-building-fires

Building management being required to do service inspections/tests regularly also seems to help a lot. Seems you can remove 70% of the death risk just by ensuring smoke detectors work (last graph).
http://www.mcscs.jus.gov.on.ca/engl...es/FatalFiresSummary/stats_fatal_summary.html

In short, a single-detached house which is well maintained is probably safest but I'm not sure the typical house is safer than the typical apartment unit above 7th floor.

Of course, being below the 7th floor isn't necessarily going to help if management is negligent.
http://www.metronews.ca/news/toront...-charged-over-fire-that-killed-3-seniors.html
 

nrb

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#4
I'm living in a new condo that's still partially under construction. We've got a real issue during the day with trades using the elevators and having to wait ages. We have 3 elevators but one of them has not been working for a couple of weeks. One of my neighbours told me that when she complained to the superintendant she was told that Ontario law does not allow 3 elevators to be running until a certain amount of the building is occupied. That sounds like a load of doo doo to me, but I'm no expert so can anyone shed any light on this? I'd estimate the building is around 60% occupied.
You're in a building that's under construction. What do you expect?

Sounds like bs to me. But complaining about construction workers using elevetors in a building under construction is ridiculous.
 
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#5
It's the elevators breaking down in older high-rises that worries me. Whether due to power failures or worse, if every elevator breaks down, getting up beyond three floors can be a problem for some of us. Trying to get up 80 to 100 stories, with most of the elevators broken, is my worry. Especially, if they build them without enough of the elevators to service residents or visitors should one, two, or three are broken down.
 
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#6
It's the elevators breaking down in older high-rises that worries me. Whether due to power failures or worse, if every elevator breaks down, getting up beyond three floors can be a problem for some of us. Trying to get up 80 to 100 stories, with most of the elevators broken, is my worry. Especially, if they build them without enough of the elevators to service residents or visitors should one, two, or three are broken down.
Agreed. We're an older building and, although we have a great contractor available 24/7, at least one elevator a month goes out for a couple of days. The problem is getting the parts. Then we end up with a hodge podge of parts. We have a generator so we will always have one elevator going at least until our fuel runs out but we are now considering a complete, expensive overhaul. There was a refurbishment about 15 years ago (before we moved in) but that Board left behind no records of exactly exactly what work was done. (Don't get me started.)
 
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#8

blixtex

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#9
I work around Yonge n Bloor and seeing 1 Bloor East and now the under construction Bloor West, it just boggles my mind how people can mindlessly just look to live on the higher floors without worrying what might happen during a power or elevator outage. And the more these things get built up, what's being done to the infrastructure to be able to handle that increased load?
 

Admiral Beez

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#10
I work around Yonge n Bloor and seeing 1 Bloor East and now the under construction Bloor West, it just boggles my mind how people can mindlessly just look to live on the higher floors without worrying what might happen during a power or elevator outage.
Indeed, my thoughts too. If I was buying a condo I'd want to be within easily climbing, and fire rescue for that matter.

Fire ladders can get up to about 10 stories, after that it's up to you to stay put and wait out or attempt to escape a fire. Not that you want to be running down a smoke filled staircase even a few floors, but odds are still better.
 
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#11
We refused to look at anything above the ninth floor, for precisely those reasons.

Furthermore, there are too many elevators, not enough elevator mechanics. Furthermore, elevators are constantly getting misused by contractors and movers and, in half-built buildings, by construction workers.
 
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#13
Thanks but, technically we're on the 8th because the ground level is No. 1 -- so there's that.

Our windows open -- and we have balconies.

Solid concrete.

I feel much safer than I did in our house in Riverdale where everybody was so close together and fires could spread roof-to-roof.

Anyway, we could do with another elevator. I wish we had one just for service, moving, deliveries, etc.