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GO Transit Electrification (Metrolinx, Proposed)

Allandale25

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^ Where did you find the transcript? There was also some talk about the DBFOM model and a questioner noted the recent media story about "P3s". Verster responded to that.
 

mickael

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Pretty satisfied with that town hall, they really cemented their commitment to electrification, and it was nice to hear about Hamilton getting more trains hopefully sooner than later.


^ Where did you find the transcript? There was also some talk about the DBFOM model and a questioner noted the recent media story about "P3s". Verster responded to that.
YouTube offers a transcript, click the three dots and it'll be an option.
 

Reecemartin

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Uhh, that kinda seems like a big deal.
Yeah it's definitely a big deal, he was touted by the Gov a lot

Also, in light of this news, I find Metrolinx's botched subway takeover all that more laughable

Metrolinx: Yea, we wanna own a subway. "It'll be easy" (The CEO actually said this)

Also Metrolinx: can't figure out how to string up some catenary without getting charged up the a*s for it
Honestly going with a North American Contractor still isn't wise imo. The only 25kv system large enough to give them the adequate experience would be work on the NEC in the US and the NEC is a total mess. (old dilapidated infrastructure, overbuilding one thing and underbuilding the next ). If you want a real crazy project to get an idea of why we should avoid American consultants etc: https://www.bizjournals.com/baltimo...ed-option-for-b-p-tunnel-4-52-billion-of.html

Basically the replacement for the severely deficient B&P tunnel in Baltimore that was reached was a 4.5 billion dollar 2ish mile tunnel with two decks and room for massive diesel freight trains.
 

Reecemartin

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I think I will post this here because it came up in the Town Hall and has been released and closely relates to Elec.

1) That large beach layover yeard in Burlington is very interesting. Absolutely a smart spot to put a big electric yard.

2) Metrolinx is proposing that the Southern Section of the RH Line is electrified and the Don Branch is turned into a three train turnaround yard (precluding it's use for HFR) Who came up with this? Having a turnaround point at the North End of the USRC makes sense but do the different levels of government even talk?
 

Allandale25

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^ Has it's been confirmed yet there won't be a through track possible for high-frequency rail? also there's been discussion on you see where people have suggested that VIA use the Stouffville Line to get to the CP Havelock Sub. I can see some advantages for going with that route.
 

Reecemartin

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The really stupidity of all this is that Metrolinx is trying to bring on a big international rail firm like DB or MTR to do things and yet they are still wasting time and money designing switch and layover locations. I'm pretty sure DB or MTR is gonna want infrastructure to match THEIR service plan.
 

junctionist

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Except how many of those same Euro contractors have experience operating in the North American environment, with our different standards and regulations?

Dan
It's not necessarily that difficult to adapt to different standards and regulations, particularly when they're aimed at the same public policy goals like safety. Bombardier, for instance, seemed to do fine building electric trains for North America and Europe.

The experienced contractors who have done numerous projects could probably adapt quickly to our regulations. My concern is that there are inexperienced contractors in North America whom we'll have to pay a lot of money so that they can learn how to build this kind of infrastructure on account of lack of experience. Perhaps let them learn alongside more experienced contractors from Europe.
 

ssiguy2

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Developments are coming in fast and furious.

Today....….the first hydrogen Alstom train has arrived in the Netherlands for testing and then immediate deployment.
2 days ago...…...KIRR {Korea} is going to be building hydrogen trains for deployment on it's non-electrified route by next year.
Last week......Germany is deploying a new hydrogen service starting this year
Last week...…..Alstom has sold it's first fleet of battery trains to be in service next year in Greater Frankfurt
2 weeks ago...…...Scotland is going to refurbish some of it's older diesel carriages into hydrogen trains starting this year as it de-carbonizes it's entire rail network by 2035
3 weeks ago.........India has signed a contract with TATA to design and build a new hydrogen train to be deployed within 2 years for it's huge suburban networks which carry over 10 million passengers a day.

If Toronto was worried about using hydrogen and/or battery due to be untested there is no threat of that as those days are long gone. In 6 years GO using hydrogen and/or battery will not be a trail blazer but rather playing catch-up.
 

mdrejhon

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I'm definitely more a fan of battery trains.

One can proceed with the RER baseline plan, and the battery trains provide a solution for hopping catenary gaps such as Brampton, Hamilton, and possibly Bowmanville.

Enough overhead catenary will be available that trains will never have to stop to recharge, and the battery capacity will be overprovisioned with sufficient emergency capacity so that it's only a 20% SoC cycling most of the time. I've written several posts about this.
 

mickael

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The obsession with hydrogen trains is all a bit much. If they are a viable option, I'm sure they will be considered. There are multiple shortcomings adopting new technology though.
Yeah, 6 years for a new train tech seems way too short for our non-trailblazer system. We need something that works, then we can muck about with new stuff.
 

Reecemartin

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I'm definitely more a fan of battery trains.

One can proceed with the RER baseline plan, and the battery trains provide a solution for hopping catenary gaps such as Brampton, Hamilton, and possibly Bowmanville.

Enough overhead catenary will be available that trains will never have to stop to recharge, and the battery capacity will be overprovisioned with sufficient emergency capacity so that it's only a 20% SoC cycling most of the time. I've written several posts about this.
Honestly,I wish we had the will to just force CN to accept catenary.
 

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