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East Bayfront: Parkside/Bayside/Dockside neighbourhoods Overview

Skeezix

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[...] It is possible to have substantial intensification and quality architecture.

It is possible to have condo towers (or mid-rise) yet preserve a more intimate streetwall/podium.

It is possible to have design variety and to preserve significant views. [...]
The complaints are almost always about "more condos", i.e. complaints about building places for people to live.

The complaints are hardly ever about architecture, streetwall/relationship to the street, or view corridors. When they are about those things, those are valid and important issues to raise. All too often, though, "it's too tall" is the only architecture or design issue raised, usually followed by a statement favouring some unreasonable and completely arbitrary height limit.

I appreciate that some members of the public who are frustrated by what they see as lack of architectural finesse and bad design at ground level may express that frustration as one with condos generally. Not everyone has the inclination, time or energy for architectural critique. But many many members of the public just don't want anything, and that is abundantly from their statements at public meetings, Community Council, etc.

So, yeah, the whole "ugh, more condos" thing is usually just a knee-jerk reaction about change and newcomers.
 

torontologist

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The complaints are almost always about "more condos", i.e. complaints about building places for people to live.

The complaints are hardly ever about architecture, streetwall/relationship to the street, or view corridors. When they are about those things, those are valid and important issues to raise. All too often, though, "it's too tall" is the only architecture or design issue raised, usually followed by a statement favouring some unreasonable and completely arbitrary height limit.

I appreciate that some members of the public who are frustrated by what they see as lack of architectural finesse and bad design at ground level may express that frustration as one with condos generally. Not everyone has the inclination, time or energy for architectural critique. But many many members of the public just don't want anything, and that is abundantly from their statements at public meetings, Community Council, etc.

So, yeah, the whole "ugh, more condos" thing is usually just a knee-jerk reaction about change and newcomers.
Maybe it's generational.. my friends and I (millennials), almost all of whom live in condos, exclusively complain about architecture and design. We recognize that more supply is necessary for more affordability. And I'm the only one who is working in/interested in urban development.

Judging by the attendees of public consultations for new developments... the "condos bad! change bad!" crowd seems to typically be from an older generation with vastly different expectations.
 

Skeezix

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Maybe it's generational.. my friends and I (millennials), almost all of whom live in condos, exclusively complain about architecture and design. We recognize that more supply is necessary for more affordability. And I'm the only one who is working in/interested in urban development.

Judging by the attendees of public consultations for new developments... the "condos bad! change bad!" crowd seems to typically be from an older generation with vastly different expectations.
I'm not sure it's entirely generational, but you will find people in certain circles who are more sophisticated and/or open-minded in their understanding of, and approach to, the issues.

I've attended a number of public meetings in one particular area, where the hostility towards the proposed projects was expressed almost entirely by twenty- and thirty-something residents from nearby condos. None of them ever raised architecture as an issue (other than, of course, height). So millennials can be as much part of the "another condo!!" crowd as anyone else.

No demographic should be patting themselves on the back here.
 

Star Fox

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Here's something interesting, and I think this is the right thread. In Waterfront Toronto's new 5-year Strategic Plan they've added a new proposed initiative: a "Signature Structure" (see page 54). WT states the following: "Exceptional waterfronts often feature unique structures that become icons of their cities. The best of these structures—the Sydney Opera House is a prime example—come to define their waterfronts, anchoring local economic and cultural activities while communicating a unique identity to the world. There are several waterfront sites that have the visibility and scale suitable for a signature building or structure that would provide a magnetic gathering place, activate the surrounding public realm and catalyze new economic clusters. Over the next five years, Waterfront Toronto plans to assess the potential for a signature structure on the waterfront..."

They've "budgeted" $80 million over the next 5 years for the project, suggesting it could be a serious structure (though I put budgeted in quotations because that money is not funded). The fact they reference the Sydney Opera House as a comparable is very exciting. I've always thought Toronto needs its own version of the Sydney or Oslo opera houses or some similar architectural/civic landmark (we have the CN Tower but no reason not to have more!).

I find it interesting that they say there "are several waterfront sites that have the visibility and scale suitable for a signature building or structure". Where are they thinking of? Is there anywhere in the East Bayfront area along the waterfront that they could have such a structure? Perhaps they mean Villiers Island/Portlands? (Personally, I'd love to see them create use dirt to create a man-made extension at the base of Yonge St (or somewhere along there) that a signature structure could be built upon and seen from anywhere on the waterfront, but I'd be quite happy to have a signature structure anywhere).
 

salsa

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Here's something interesting, and I think this is the right thread. In Waterfront Toronto's new 5-year Strategic Plan they've added a new proposed initiative: a "Signature Structure" (see page 54). WT states the following: "Exceptional waterfronts often feature unique structures that become icons of their cities. The best of these structures—the Sydney Opera House is a prime example—come to define their waterfronts, anchoring local economic and cultural activities while communicating a unique identity to the world. There are several waterfront sites that have the visibility and scale suitable for a signature building or structure that would provide a magnetic gathering place, activate the surrounding public realm and catalyze new economic clusters. Over the next five years, Waterfront Toronto plans to assess the potential for a signature structure on the waterfront..."
Where was all this talk of "signature structures" and "exceptional waterfronts" back then when they allowed this to happen?

182561


182564
 

drum118

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No idea where this should be place as there isn't a thread just for East Bayfront only

Public Notice
East Bayfront Community Open House Meeting


West-facing aerial view of East Bayfront and downtown Toronto.

Waterfront Toronto and the City of Toronto invite you to join us on Tuesday, June 11 for an East Bayfront community open house meeting. This meeting will provide updates on a number of ongoing projects in the area including parks and public spaces, Bayside development, stormwater and sanitary sewer infrastructure, Queens Quay East transit, upcoming road construction, future community services, and more.

This meeting will be an informal, drop-in format where community members are invited to visit a series of information boards and speak with project subject matter experts to learn more. No formal presentations will be held. Councillor Joe Cressy will be in attendance at the start of the meeting.

Public Meeting Details
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2019
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Location: St. Lawrence Temporary Market, 125 The Esplanade, Toronto, ON M5E 1C3
TTC: 121 Fort York-Esplanade Bus to The Esplanade at Lower Jarvis
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessibility is at the main entrance off The Esplanade.

For additional information, call (416) 214-1344 x301 or email info@waterfrontoronto.ca

For a printable version of this notice, please click here.
 

marcus_a_j

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East Bayfront Open House June 11, 2019

Waterfront Toronto and the City of Toronto invite you to join us on Tuesday, June 11 for an East Bayfront Community Open House meeting. This meeting will provide updates on a number of ongoing projects in the area including parks and public spaces, Bayside development, stormwater and sanitary sewer infrastructure, Queens Quay East transit, upcoming road construction, future community services, and more. This meeting will be an informal, drop-in format where community members are invited to visit a series of information boards and speak with project subject matter experts to learn more. No formal presentations will be held. Councillor Joe Cressy will be in attendance at the start of the meeting.
 

DSC

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Thanks for posting - I find it rather alarming that they did not seem to mention the QQE streetcar - WT used to talk about 'transit first' and not having new residents get into the habit of driving everywhere. It may be a bit late for that but more and more people are moving into the area and the lack of adequate transit is a REAL problem already and will get FAR worse!
 

DSC

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Community Centre is moving ahead, slowly.

City Council authorize the City of Toronto to enter into, and the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, to execute on behalf of the City, a Development Management Agreement for the development of an approximately 25,000 square foot community recreation centre (the Recreation Centre) within a mixed-use project containing residential, commercial, and retail components (the Block 4 Project) at 261 Queens Quay East

See: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2019.GL6.24
 
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