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Cycling infrastructure (Separated bike lanes)

Yet the TTC won't build any passing track, allowing the 1/2 empty streetcar in behind to jump ahead. There are spots downtown w/no parking (think Queen by the Eaton Centre, where you could 4-track and allow streetcars to pass each other.
Why not allow the streetcar to move onto the oncoming track? Of course car traffic would need to watch out.

Here's a passing tracking in old Chicago.

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https://thetrolleydodger.com/2015/11/16/chicago-surface-lines-photos-part-two/

And a Seattle passing track in the 1990s.

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http://picssr.com/photos/lwdemery/page94
 
Sad for Toronto. :(


From link.

After years of incremental but frustratingly slow progress, London is making huge strides on creating a safe, all-ages bike network. The big breakthrough was the city's launch of physically protected "bicycle superhighways" that separate cyclists from motor vehicle traffic over long, continuous routes. Two years after the first of these bicycle superhighways debuted, they are clearly making an enormous difference.

People are voting with their pedals. The number of bicyclists entering central London is now approaching the number of cars. At rush hour, people on bikes account for 70 percent of all trips over Blackfriars Bridge.

Under Mayor Sadiq Khan, London has budgeted £169 million per year to build out the bicycle superhighways and other elements of the bike network, according to the mayor's walking and cycling commissioner, Will Norman.

The bicycle superhighways are not perfect. The bike lanes, although impressively wide, already can't contain the numbers of cyclists at rush hour. The speed of bike traffic can be so brisk that it intimidates pedestrians and discourages some people from getting into the habit of cycling. And advocates say the city needs to pick up the pace of implementing the bike network so "the brave" aren't the only ones out there.

But there is no denying that the bicycle superhighways are succeeding. Video footage of cyclists streaming over the routes is breathtaking. I visited London in 2015 and at the time I thought the city had a healthy level of cycling, but the bike network was only getting started. Returning to London this June, the changes were truly impressive. Enjoy this Streetfilm and hear from local riders, researchers, advocates, and public officials about London's push to become a great city for cycling.
 
A bunch of artists have painted the concrete barriers on the new Lakeshore cycletrack. More of this everywhere please!



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Images from StreetARToronto
 

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TO InView just uploaded it's draft 2020 construction schedule. This outlines the citie's major infrastructure projects planned for 2020, including new bike infrastructure installations. I've listed some notable ones below:

Full road reconstructions with bike lane upgrades included:

- Shuter from Sherbourne to River. Bike lane upgrades are listed as Church to River.
- Wellesley from Sherbourne to Ontario
- Gerrard from Elizabeth to Yonge
- Gerrard from Sherbourne to Parliament
- Bloor from Avenue Rd to Spadina


New installations:
- Bloor Street from Avenue Rd to Yonge St.
- Bloor Street from Shaw to Lansdowne
- West Toronto Railpath extension starts construction
- new neighbourhood connections around the WTRP terminus - behind Camh, etc. to connect it to the richmond/adelaide cycletracks
- Some sort of new cycling facility on Front St. from Bathurst to Spadina
- Danforth is listed as getting bike lanes from Broadview to Danforth Rd.
- Victoria Park from Gerrard to Elvaston (North of Eglinton)
- East Don Trail completes construction

Most exciting is Bloor St. The lanes would now go from Lansdowne to Yonge street if this actually happens.

Not too sure about the Danforth project - there hasn't been much political discussion on that one yet. I'd like to see it happen though. If it does it would leave only a small gap between Sherbourne and Yonge without lanes.
 
TO InView just uploaded it's draft 2020 construction schedule. This outlines the citie's major infrastructure projects planned for 2020, including new bike infrastructure installations. I've listed some notable ones below:

Full road reconstructions with bike lane upgrades included:

- Shuter from Sherbourne to River. Bike lane upgrades are listed as Church to River.
- Wellesley from Sherbourne to Ontario
- Gerrard from Elizabeth to Yonge
- Gerrard from Sherbourne to Parliament
- Bloor from Avenue Rd to Spadina


New installations:
- Bloor Street from Avenue Rd to Yonge St.
- Bloor Street from Shaw to Lansdowne
- West Toronto Railpath extension starts construction
- new neighbourhood connections around the WTRP terminus - behind Camh, etc. to connect it to the richmond/adelaide cycletracks
- Some sort of new cycling facility on Front St. from Bathurst to Spadina
- Danforth is listed as getting bike lanes from Broadview to Danforth Rd.
- Victoria Park from Gerrard to Elvaston (North of Eglinton)
- East Don Trail completes construction

Most exciting is Bloor St. The lanes would now go from Lansdowne to Yonge street if this actually happens.

Not too sure about the Danforth project - there hasn't been much political discussion on that one yet. I'd like to see it happen though. If it does it would leave only a small gap between Sherbourne and Yonge without lanes.

Bloor is indeed exciting, and bike lanes there were already in the works on the Church to Sherbourne section as well.

In respect of Danforth....it may be politically feasible.......though I'm not sure........its on the ambitious side.

Victoria Park I can't picture this one at all.

There is room from just north of Crescent Town Road to Denton (south side of Vic Park Station) without changing the lane count.

Denton to Gerrard has real issues around accomodating turning movements, particularly at Danforth, from both sides. But might be workable if they took away a small lane on TD's property on the N-W corner.

The current narrow section above Crescent Town to Dawes ( one lane each way) would strike me as rather challenged. There's 8.5M curb to Curb, at 3M min. per traffic lane, that leaves only 1.2M per bike lane, tops.

North of Dawes, it would likely mean cutting travel lanes; its 15.5M curb to curb, so at 3m per travel lane, I guess you could squeeze in 1.7M Bike lanes...........

****

They just re-did a big chunk of Donlands and repainted it w/4 lanes again, and kept the damned angled parking by O'Connor which precludes bike lanes, sidewalk widening and which is terrible from a sightlne perspective for motorists.

It should have been bike laned, with parallel parking.
 
I wonder how long it will take the Bixi bike to expand to the new ends of the cycling network in East York/Scarborough.

I've made the prediction in the other thread that South Scarborough will get a high concentration of Bixi stations before Eglinton does. The Victoria Park and Danforth proposed lanes will help that prediction along I am sure.
 
I noticed this (really short 230m) addition to the bike lane infrastructure on the Crosstown website. Temporary? Or part of the Eglinton Connects project?

Traffic and Pedestrian Changes
  • All four crosswalks at the Yonge-Eglinton intersection will be open during this stage.
  • Eglinton Avenue will remain as one lane in each direction between Duplex Avenue and Dunfield Avenue.
  • Yonge Street will open up to two lanes in each direction at Eglinton Avenue.
  • Bike lanes will be added on Eglinton Avenue from Duplex Avenue to Dunfield Avenue.
  • Holly Street will re-open for this stage.
  • Cowbell Lane will remain closed.
  • All turn restrictions at the Yonge-Eglinton intersection will remain.
 
I noticed this (really short 230m) addition to the bike lane infrastructure on the Crosstown website. Temporary? Or part of the Eglinton Connects project?

Traffic and Pedestrian Changes
  • All four crosswalks at the Yonge-Eglinton intersection will be open during this stage.
  • Eglinton Avenue will remain as one lane in each direction between Duplex Avenue and Dunfield Avenue.
  • Yonge Street will open up to two lanes in each direction at Eglinton Avenue.
  • Bike lanes will be added on Eglinton Avenue from Duplex Avenue to Dunfield Avenue.
  • Holly Street will re-open for this stage.
  • Cowbell Lane will remain closed.
  • All turn restrictions at the Yonge-Eglinton intersection will remain.

Might have been fine for the former suburb of the "Town of North Toronto", in 1912 before it was annexed by the former "City of Toronto".

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From link.
 
Who in their right mind is cycling on Eglinton given the current construction nightmare?

Especially between Duplex and Dunfield...

Note to cyclists, use Roehampton or Soudan until 2026 when Eglinton Connects project is (hopefully) underway.
 
Who in their right mind is cycling on Eglinton given the current construction nightmare?
Who in their right mind is driving on Eglinton given the conditions? Many obviously.

Is cycling impacted more than driving? I would have thought cycling on Eglinton would be less delayed than driving.
 
Who in their right mind is driving on Eglinton given the conditions? Many obviously.

Is cycling impacted more than driving? I would have thought cycling on Eglinton would be less delayed than driving.
Driving on Eglinton is not a pleasant experience, I will tell you. So much so, that I find it easier to walk 1.5km home from the station than to take the bus.

The problem with cycling on Eglinton is that it is flat out dangerous at the moment. Drivers are confused, the road configuration is confusing and changes every day, there are construction vehicles everywhere, there are many lane restrictions (forcing you to share a narrow lane with not just cars but also buses!), you have multiple lights, and the road conditions are in a miserable state of disrepair, dirtiness and full of debris.

I could go on, but bottom line is most locals I see cycle on the side streets, for good reason. In fairness, they were doing so even before construction on the Crosstown began. Until Eglinton Connects happens, it is just a much better, arguably faster, and more pleasant experience.
 
The problem with cycling on Eglinton is that it is flat out dangerous at the moment. Drivers are confused, the road configuration is confusing and changes every day, there are construction vehicles everywhere, there are many lane restrictions (forcing you to share a narrow lane with not just cars but also buses!), you have multiple lights, and the road conditions are in a miserable state of disrepair, dirtiness and full of debris.
Ironic you should post this, I was there just yesterday with Big Black Lab, getting off at Eg West station to walk him down the Cedarvale and then the Nordheimer ravines to downtown. Excellent walk, but even *crossing Eg* as a pedestrian, even with a green light in your favour at that corner is one step from suicide. I held Lab very close, and had to continually look 360 degrees to ensure his safety and mine. You're absolutely right, most of the motorists haven't a clue as to the lay of the flow, can't half blame them.

But I did see a couple of cyclists go through there. Ummm...I think 'idiocy' is too lame a term for them. Even if you've got the motorists' attention, you have no idea of a safe path through all the timbers and ruts. 'Darwin' is calling...That corner never was that safe even before construction. It's now magnitudes worse. I'm an avid cyclist, but even when there was no construction, Eg was a last resort to use to tie safe streets together. I'm no wuss, in clement weather I still do 100 km treks away from busy roads, but I also like to live. Even Bloor, with cycle lanes, is dangerous still. Very dangerous, many just don't realize it until getting whacked.

Clearly pedestrians are an afterthought with the signal phases at Eg West(Is it Cedervale yet?) It's going to need an entrance/exit on the south side more than ever.
 
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@steveintoronto I remember you mentioned there are more cyclists entering the downtown core than drivers using the DVP. Would love to learn more. Can you flip me a source?
 
@steveintoronto I remember you mentioned there are more cyclists entering the downtown core than drivers using the DVP. Would love to learn more. Can you flip me a source?
The source was the City of Toronto...and it was about three years back. I've been unable to locate it since, but I'll look again. It was to make the point on success of the Richmond and Adelaide lanes.

If I can't locate the source, which I found astounding at the time (it did have provisos like time and direction) I'll have to withdraw the claim.

Addendum: Quick Google shows this which I suspect is the basis of the claim:
https://www.cycleto.ca/news/major-increase-torontonians-biking-work-34-some-neighbourhoods
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/new...aking-public-transit-to-work/article37127643/
Still looking...

Second Addendum:

Still looking, but getting closer (I hope)
OCTOBER 19, 2016
Of course, the popularity of bike lanes isn’t shown just through polling. It’s also demonstrated by real-life measurements. For instance, during morning rush hour on Bloor Street, waves of cyclists can be seen travelling east along the new bike lanes. A recent count by Bells on Bloor volunteers documented a total of 1,519 vehicles on Bloor (at Spadina) between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m.. Of these vehicles, 660—or 43 per cent of the total—were bicycles. Over the course of the day, 6,099 bicycles were counted in the bike lane, an increase of over 75 per cent compared to a count a year earlier (before bike lane installation).[...]
https://torontoist.com/2016/10/bike-lanes-now-popular-toronto/

Late Addendum: To be clear, IIRC, the claim was for cyclists into the core from all directions vs vehicles down the DVP. I'm still missing an essential 'tag' to search with. Getting lots of encouraging gists of the claim, but not the exact one. Others have asked reference for this claim as well, and I'll continue looking. Once found, if it exists, it makes a compelling point.
 
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