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Bloor-Yonge Station Capacity Enhancement

TransitBart

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I'm wary of derailing this thread into a political grudge match, and they've given us plenty of other reasons to mistrust them, but have the Trudeau Liberals actually gone back on any promised transit funding since they took power? I can't think of any cancelled projects but maybe I'm missing something.
They have not. Our cynicism is winning out over our confidence in government to carry through with (promised) needed improvements to public infrastructure.
 

lead82

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It absolutely will be worth it, even with the introduction of the Relief Line.

Automatic Train Control will substantially increase the carrying capacity of Line 1, and the number of peak hour passengers transferring to Line 2. Even with the DRL/OL to Eglinton, the Yonge Line will still be very close to capacity.

The Line 2 Bloor-Yonge platforms are too narrow to accommodate all that additional demand from transfers. Crowded platforms means delayed trains, which means a reduction in headways and capacity on Line 2 and potentially even on Line 1. The Bloor-Yonge expansion is going to be critical for managing the increased transfer demand induced by ATO on Line 1.
I don’t believe ATC will reduce headways or increase capacity much. It has the potential to sure but the TTC hasn’t procured new trains on line 1 or 2 that would be required to support additional capacity and reduced headway to 90 seconds as mentioned. The other limit is station capacity downstream. Stations on Yonge south of Bloor have limited vertical capacity to get people in/out quickly. This will limit the number of trains that that TTC can run. King, Dundas and College are particularly bad in rush hours. I’d prioritize expanding those stations first. Mainly because doing the Yonge-Bloor renovation will greatly reduce capacity of the platforms as workers and machinery will take up lots of space. This will in make the existing bottleneck there much worse and there will not be any alternatives available. So in my opinion this renovation should be postponed until Relief line is operational. That or the city should have a plan to shut down Yonge St from Bloor to Front and create dedicated bus only express lanes during the decade of construction (very doubtful that our politicians would ever allow for that).
 

Kyle Campbell

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...Bloor-Yonge is nothing when compared with...

Well I wouldn't consider Mumbai the standard we should be aiming for.... :)

Apparently it's newsworthy to have a day with no fatalities

 

W. K. Lis

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Well I wouldn't consider Mumbai the standard we should be aiming for.... :)

Apparently it's newsworthy to have a day with no fatalities

That maybe when the suburban politicians may improve public transit throughout Toronto. Then again, maybe not if they don't use public transit, as usual.
 

Reecemartin

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Ontario Line shouldnt stop at Ontario place but needs have a few more stops on King or Queen Street and then move up to link up with Dundas West and then Mount Dennis so you have a closed circular loop.
The station is at Ex which is actually a decent terminus, has some room for potential future train storage, and allows for numerous transfers and a relief valve for Union on the West.

Also surprised nobody mentioned but part of the Province and Cities deal with the OL and subways was funding this, so we should be hearing more hopefully.
 

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