Ryerson University will be hosting a pair of architectural lectures this week and next. The first, this Thursday, is titled The Permanent, the Temporary, and the Illusionary, and will be delivered by Sandor Naus, co-founder of Rotterdam-based architects Monadnock. 

Sandor Naus, Monadnock, Ryerson UniversitySandor Naus of Monadnock, image courtesy of Ryerson University

Founded in 2006 by Job Floris and Sandor Naus, the firm is known for site-specific design, including several projects in The Netherlands like ‘Strand’, a beach pavilion on the River Maas, ‘Make No Little Plans’, a huge temporary installation on a city square in Utrecht, the ‘Landmark’, a viewing tower in the heart of Nieuw-Bergen, shortlisted for the Mies van der Rohe Award in 2017, and the ‘Atlas House’ in Eindhoven, which received a Brick Award in 2018.

Sandor Naus, Monadnock, Ryerson University‘Make No Little Plans’ in Utrecht, image via monadnock.nl

The event will take place on Thursday, March 7th at 6:30 PM in room 202 at 325 Church Street. The event is free and open to the public, though registration is required. 

Next week, Ryerson University's School of Urban and Regional Planning is hosting New York City-based architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi for a public guest lecture as part of the Hemson Simpson Lecture Series. The firm's projects include master-planned districts, institutional buildings and urban parks. WEISS/MANFREDI is working with Teeple Architects to design the University of Toronto Partnerships in Innovation and Entrepreneurship (PIE) Complex on College Street, which is currently in the planning stages.

WEISS/MANFREDIMarion Weiss and Michael Manfredi of WEISS/MANFREDI, image courtesy of Ryerson University

One of the firm's most unique additions to an urban landscape is Seattle's Olympic Sculpture Park, an initiative that transformed the city's central waterfront. Like Toronto, Seattle's waterfront is detached from its city centre by a rail corridor and highway. WEISS/MANFREDI designed a series of elevated pathways that both link the city to the water's edge, and leave the functionality of the transportation corridors intact.

WEISS/MANFREDIAerial view, Seattle Art Museum: Olympic Sculpture Park, image courtesy of WEISS/MANFREDI

The lecture hours are eligible to be logged for Ontario Association of Architects (OAA) Continuing Education credit. Taking place on Thursday, March 14th at 6:30 PM in Room LIB-72 at 350 Victoria Street, the event will be free and open to the public. Registration is required on Ryerson's website here.

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