The University of Toronto's John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture will hold an exhibition exploring the programming and design for a future public park in Toronto's Lower Junction Triangle. Showcasing the work of 15 students from the Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture programs—overseen by lecturer and landscape architect Victoria Taylor—the exhibit will be held on Sterling Road on Monday, February 27th. 

Poster image for ART SITE URBANISM EXHIBITION, by Sebastien Beauregard + RichardPoster image for ART SITE URBANISM EXHIBITION, by Sebastien Beauregard + Richard Freeman

The exhibit will look at design concepts (not proposed solutions) for parkland and public space in one of Toronto's fastest changing neighbourhoods, which is taking shape around Sterling Road's now-iconic Tower Automotive Building. Branded as the Lower Junction Triangle, the area—which is currently a hub of artist's studios and galleries—will provide a new home for the Museum of Contemporary Art_Toronto_Canada (MOCA), with the museum taking over the first five floors of the Tower Automotive Building.

The Tower Automotive Building in late January, image by UT Forum contributor vicThe Tower Automotive Building in late January, image by UT Forum contributor vic

Alongside a number of planned residential and mixed-use projects—led by developers Castlepoint Numa and Greybrook Realty Partners—over one acre (more than 4,000 m²) of the approximately 8-acres now under development will be devoted to parkland and public space, replacing formerly industrial brownfields sites.

A look at the future layout, with Tower Automotive labelled as 3C, image via CasA look at the future layout, with Tower Automotive labelled as 3C, image via Castlepoint Numa

The event will be taking place Monday, February 27th, from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM, at the Lower Jct. Sales Centre at 213 Sterling Road. The event is free; more information about the event is available via the Faculty website,as well as the event's Facebook page. An overview of the Lower Junction Triangle can be found on a previous UrbanToronto article, as well as the dataBase files linked below.