It has been precisely one month since we last checked in on the construction progress of Concert Properties' 88 Scott, a Page + Steele / IBI Group Architects-designed 58-storey condominium tower rising where Toronto's St. Lawrence and Financial Districts meet. In the time since our last update, the tower has continued its ascent towards a final height of 204 metres (669 feet), and cladding installation has progressed significantly.

88 Scott Street, Concert Properties, Page + Steele / IBI Group88 Scott Street making an impact on the Toronto skyline, image by UT Forum contributor drum118

The most apparent change since our previous update is the re-creation of the 1951-built Royal and Sun Alliance building's south and east facades, which were disassembled when the structure behind was demolished back in 2013 to make way for the new development.

88 Scott Street, Concert Properties, Page + Steele / IBI Group88 Scott Street viewed from the southeast, image by Craig White

Installation of limestone and granite cladding was first spotted in late-February, and in the weeks since, much of the base's south facade has been re-skinned to match the original structure. To the west, most of the curtain wall glazing has been installed for the 68,000 square foot office and retail component, to be known by a separate address of 20 Wellington Street East.

88 Scott Street, Concert Properties, Page + Steele / IBI GroupLimestone cladding on the base of 88 Scott Street, image by Craig White

While only a portion of the heritage south facade has been installed, the previous structure's fluted pilasters are now quite apparent to passersby on Wellington Street East. A closer look at the limestone cladding reveals the impressive attention to detail paid to faithfully restoring the historic facades.

88 Scott Street, Concert Properties, Page + Steele / IBI GroupLimestone cladding on the base of 88 Scott Street, image by Craig White

Above the heritage base, cladding installation is fast progressing for the tower portion with reflective windows framed by black mullions now appearing between precast concrete panels. The hefty panels now rise to the 13th level, a notable cladding choice in a high-rise housing market dominated by glass: while the City of Toronto now requires 60% of building glazing to be opaque and well insulated, most buildings seem to accomplish that with black-painted glass spandrel. For 88 Scott, the developer and architect have chosen a more solid, classic look in comparison. 

88 Scott Street, Concert Properties, Page + Steele / IBI GroupPrecast cladding and dark tinted windows on 88 Scott Street, image by Craig White

We will return with additional updates as construction continues for the new development. In the meanwhile, additional information and renderings can be found in our dataBase file for the project, linked below. Want to get involved in the discussion? Check out the project's associated Forum threads, or leave a comment using the space provided at the bottom of this page.

To request more info directly from 88 Scott Street click here