As details about the Crosstown LRT continue to emerge, a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) has now been announced for the system's public art installations. In the wake of Metrolinx's October 1st presentation to the Design Review Panel (DRP), where the design aesthetic for the network's underground stations and outdoor platforms was first revealed, Metrolinx's RFQ represents the first stage of an $8 million integrated art strategy implemented across six of the system's stations. Working from the designs presented to the DRP, Metrolinx's new renderings give us a rough idea of how public art installations could be configured into the stations. 

The Crosstown's six intermodal stations form the focus of the integrated art strategy, with Mount Dennis, Caledonia, Allen, Yonge, Kennedy, and Don Mills (the station names are still subject to change), set to receive public art installations. 

Eglinton Crosstown LRT, Metrolinx, TTC, Crosslink Transit SolutionsThe exterior of Yonge Station shown with a placeholder art installation at left, image courtesy of Metrolinx

To provide a general idea of how the public art installations could take shape, Metrolinx has released new conceptual renderings illustrating examples incorporated art. Yonge Station is shown with an art display along the exterior mechanical panel (above), while the interior of Kennedy Station is seen below.

Eglinton Crosstown LRT, Metrolinx, TTC, Crosslink Transit SolutionsThe interior of Kennedy Station, image courtesy of Metrolinx

Metrolinx defines an integrated art piece as one that "either replaces standard facility finished or fixtures, or is integrated into standard facility finishes or fixtures." Unlike stand-alone decor elements which are added to a completed facility, integrated art can be incorporated directly into the structural components of the station. Floor tiles, walls, ceilings, video screens, and even mechanical components can become art installations, as well as landscaping elements and video screens.

While the above renderings do not reflect a particular style of art sought for the stations, the images serve to provide an indication of how integrated art can be used, with the buildings' structural elements directly incorporated into the installations. 

The RFQ forms the first step of a two-part process, and will be followed by a series of Requests for Proposal (RFP), where shortlisted artists will be asked to provide more detailed plans. The submission process is open to any professional artist(s), with more detailed criteria available via Metrolinx. The deadline for the RFQ is November 30th.