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VIA Rail

robmausser

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So VIA would dictate the schedule and the terms in which the service is to be run, which is contracted out to a private company which will operate the service?

No, in this case it would be a different agency from VIA I believe. I don't think VIA will have anything to do with HFR any more. It would be a different arm of the government or a new agency. I could be wrong however.
 

11th

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Some Tweets of members of the public who were on board:




Since only 2/32 trainsets are delivered, I wonder how fast the rest will come?
I understand they want to be inclusive, but now, that washroom symbol has become meaningless.
They are better off using a pictogram of the actual toilet - as they always should have.
 

reaperexpress

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Emily Farina's post indicates that the top speed was 152 km/h (95 mph), but Train 33 covers some 100 mph (160 km/h) territory. David Bellerive's post indicates that the train did reach 160 km/h.

I wonder which track speed category the train uses. CN lines often include many different speed limits for different types of passenger trains. The highest category is "LRC", which is currently only contains the P42 locomotives and Rennaissance coaches. Ironically the LRC coaches themselves are in a lower category since their tilting system was removed. I'm not sure why the Ren coaches have a higher speed rating, it's not like they tilt either. I hope the Siemens trains are categorized as 'LRC', which would permit about 5-10 mph more than the limits which currently apply to LRC coaches, and 10-15 mph faster than HEP coaches. VIA's comments about improved speeds suggest that this may indeed be the case.

I'm surprised they have open luggage racks. As I recall, the UP Express Nippon Sharyo DMUs needed to be modified from the American version to enclose luggage racks per Transport Canada requirements.
It makes so much sense using it on the Quebec-Ottawa trains first. Not only does it keep it close to MMC, but it saves time not having to wye it after leaving Montreal.
It also serves all 3 of Via's stations with high-level platforms, which is great for photo ops. And it serves 3 major cities in both provinces. Overall a really smart choice for a first run.
 

Bordercollie

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Emily Farina's post indicates that the top speed was 152 km/h (95 mph), but Train 33 covers some 100 mph (160 km/h) territory. David Bellerive's post indicates that the train did reach 160 km/h.

I wonder which track speed category the train uses. CN lines often include many different speed limits for different types of passenger trains. The highest category is "LRC", which is currently only contains the P42 locomotives and Rennaissance coaches. Ironically the LRC coaches themselves are in a lower category since their tilting system was removed. I'm not sure why the Ren coaches have a higher speed rating, it's not like they tilt either. I hope the Siemens trains are categorized as 'LRC', which would permit about 5-10 mph more than the limits which currently apply to LRC coaches, and 10-15 mph faster than HEP coaches. VIA's comments about improved speeds suggest that this may indeed be the case.

I'm surprised they have open luggage racks. As I recall, the UP Express Nippon Sharyo DMUs needed to be modified from the American version to enclose luggage racks per Transport Canada requirements.

It also serves all 3 of Via's stations with high-level platforms, which is great for photo ops. And it serves 3 major cities in both provinces. Overall a really smart choice for a first run.
If you can pull the posted schedule you should be able to figure out the allowed speed.

I think the open luggage compartment is going to be a problem.
 

crs1026

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If you can pull the posted schedule you should be able to figure out the allowed speed.

I think the open luggage compartment is going to be a problem.

The official CN operating parameters will eventually leak out. In the meanwhile, Moving Maps is probably your best gauge.

Open luggage racks are far better for the customer, easier to use and less chance of anything falling out and getting left behind. I’m pleased to see TC relent on this.

- Paul
 

smallspy

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why would they need to do that they can operate the train from either end? One end is the engine the other is a cab car much like how to go transit and many other trans operate now, there is no need to turn trains around.
That's the whole point.

If you look at the schedules of the Quebec-to-Ottawa trains today, they take an extra 10 minutes eastbound to get to Saint-Lambert, and an extra 10 minutes westbound to get to Dorval. That time is due to those trains needing to back out of the station to the wye, and then continue forward after that maneuver. The trains being used today only have one loco and no cab car. The new trains will eliminate this, and thus also allow the schedules to tighten up somewhat.

Dan
 

smallspy

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I wonder which track speed category the train uses. CN lines often include many different speed limits for different types of passenger trains. The highest category is "LRC", which is currently only contains the P42 locomotives and Rennaissance coaches. Ironically the LRC coaches themselves are in a lower category since their tilting system was removed. I'm not sure why the Ren coaches have a higher speed rating, it's not like they tilt either. I hope the Siemens trains are categorized as 'LRC', which would permit about 5-10 mph more than the limits which currently apply to LRC coaches, and 10-15 mph faster than HEP coaches. VIA's comments about improved speeds suggest that this may indeed be the case.

The Siemens equipment is cleared for "LRC" speeds.

I'm surprised they have open luggage racks. As I recall, the UP Express Nippon Sharyo DMUs needed to be modified from the American version to enclose luggage racks per Transport Canada requirements.

I'm puzzled by this as well. Not having seen the equipment up close yet, I wonder if they have some details in them to allow for their open-ness.

Dan
 

reaperexpress

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That's the whole point.

If you look at the schedules of the Quebec-to-Ottawa trains today, they take an extra 10 minutes eastbound to get to Saint-Lambert, and an extra 10 minutes westbound to get to Dorval. That time is due to those trains needing to back out of the station to the wye, and then continue forward after that maneuver. The trains being used today only have one loco and no cab car. The new trains will eliminate this, and thus also allow the schedules to tighten up somewhat.
At one point they had some bidirectional consists with LRC coaches with 50/50 seating and a locomotive on both ends. What happened to that?
 

Urban Sky

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At one point they had some bidirectional consists with LRC coaches with 50/50 seating and a locomotive on both ends. What happened to that?
According to this cycling plan from June, push-pull consists still operate on cyles L8, L9 and Fridays-Mondays on L6:
According to this cycling plan, #62 has the same six-car HEP-II consist (H1) every day except Saturdays (L3):
View attachment 410103
 
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EastYorkTTCFan

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That's the whole point.

If you look at the schedules of the Quebec-to-Ottawa trains today, they take an extra 10 minutes eastbound to get to Saint-Lambert, and an extra 10 minutes westbound to get to Dorval. That time is due to those trains needing to back out of the station to the wye, and then continue forward after that maneuver. The trains being used today only have one loco and no cab car. The new trains will eliminate this, and thus also allow the schedules to tighten up somewhat.

Dan
and that's what you didn't make clear in your original post which is why I asked for clarification.
 

roger1818

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and that's what you didn't make clear in your original post which is why I asked for clarification.
I’m my original post I said:
it saves time NOT having to wye it after leaving Montreal.

The old trains didn’t have cab cars and none of the trains with 2 locomotives were used on the Quebec-Ottawa route, so wyeing was necessary mid route, after leaving Montreal. The new trains are bi-directional so wyeing is no longer necessary.
 

EastYorkTTCFan

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I’m my original post I said:


The old trains didn’t have cab cars and none of the trains with 2 locomotives were used on the Quebec-Ottawa route, so wyeing was necessary mid route, after leaving Montreal. The new trains are bi-directional so wyeing is no longer necessary.
Ah ok no problem I guess i misread it the first time.
 

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