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TTC: Automatic Train Control and Subway Platform Screen Doors

trtcttc

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This is just my personal experience but I don’t see ATC affecting anything (other than cost) until they can have better operating procedures. For the last two weeks, when I commute into the office on Thursday (only day I commute), the train has been delayed for over 20 minutes due to “security incident”, ”medical emergency”, and “mechanical issues”. And the other times I’ve taken transit about half the time there’s an announcement about an outage somewhere on the line, even if it’s not the stations I’m travelling to. I understand emergencies happen but I refuse to believe people don’t have medical emergencies in Europe or East Asia. There has to be more priority placed on the speed of the service when they’re dealing with outages to get the trains moving instead of one emergency alarm holding up 5 trains.
 

W. K. Lis

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We should remember that with human control, the trains could exceed the speed limit on a regular basis. With ATC, the trains will accelerate up to the speed limit, and no more. Suspect that where the trains are running downhill, the ATC will nudge the brakes to slow down to the speed limit.
 

beatle04

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We should remember that with human control, the trains could exceed the speed limit on a regular basis. With ATC, the trains will accelerate up to the speed limit, and no more. Suspect that where the trains are running downhill, the ATC will nudge the brakes to slow down to the speed limit.

On downhill sections of track there were timed blocks which are designed to prevent humans from going over the speed limit. The signal would show red with a flashing white light. If the train approached at the correct speed, the signal would turn green or yellow before the train actually reached the signal. If the train was speeding, it would cross the signal while still flashing white causing the e-brake to activate.

Subway drivers used to drive trains at a speed where they would cross the signal at the perfect timing such that they never actually saw the signal turn green/yellow. After the Russel Hill accident, the policy was changed that the drivers need to see the signal change to green/yellow.
 

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