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Toronto's Waterfront Planning

js97

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Okay, I'm just going through the list

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/hope-floats-on-torontos-waterfront/article1228371/


1) Mimico Waterfront Park

A 1.1 kilometre stretch of waterfront trail with improved public access to Lake Ontario.

2008: 600 metre section opens. ( Final 500 metres tied to future acquisition of privately-held land).

Cost: $18.6-million.

(2) Port Union Waterfront Park

3.6 kilometres of trails, shoreline and wetlands from the Rouge River to Highland Creek on Lake Ontario.

2006: Two-kilometre stretch opens. ( Final 1.6 kilometres to open in 2011.)

Cost: $29- million

(3) Wave Decks

New pedestrian access to the water's edge at the foot of Spadina Avenue, Simcoe Street, Rees Street and Parliament Street.

2008: Spadina Wave Deck opens ($ 4.4-million)

2009: Simcoe Wave Deck opens ($6-million).

August, 2009: Rees Wave Deck set to open ($4-million)

Future: Parliament Wave Deck under development, no confirmed budget or timetable.

(4) Queens Quay Boulevard

A proposed facelift for a 2.6 kilometre stretch from Spadina Avenue to Parliament Street, with a centre lane for streetcars, two traffic lanes only on the north side and a treelined public realm on the south side at the water's edge.

2012: Estimated completion, subject to final government approvals this year.

Cost: $192-million

(5) Footbridges

Five new wooden bridges for pedestrians to cross from the foot of one slip ( Spadina, Peter, Rees, Simcoe, Police Basin) to another in the central waterfront.

2009: Construction begins for Spadina, pending regulatory approval.

Future: Others follow in time, budget-dependent.

Cost: Spadina ($11.4-million); Peter ($15.6-million); Rees ($8.3-million); Simcoe ($15.2-million) and Police Basin ($6.2-million)

(6) Gardiner Expressway

Possible removal of a 2.4 kilometre stretch from Lower Jarvis Street to east of the Don Valley Parkway at Logan Avenue, replaced by a University Avenue-style boulevard.

Timetable: Unclear. Depends on multilevel government approvals after an environmental assessment report due December 2011.

Cost: $300-million minimum

(7) Sugar Beach

A new 0.4 hectare urban park opposite Redpath Sugar at the foot of Lower Jarvis Street.

2010: set to open next summer

Cost: $14-million

(8) Sherbourne Park

A 1.5 hectare year-round park at the foot of Sherbourne Street, with a waterfall feature that doubles as a storm water management system. Located in the heart of East Bayfront, a proposed new neighbourhood.

2010: Set to open next summer.

Cost: $29.1-million

(9) East Bayfront

A 22 hectare site between Jarvis and Parliament, with live-work options designed to lure creative industries and other hightech employers. To be built over the next 10-15 years, with 7,000 units of housing, 8,000 jobs and . 2.4-million square feet of commercial space.

Key elements:

Corus Quay, a $150-million office complex for Corus Entertainment and its 1,200 employees, set to open in 2010;

George Brown College health science campus for 4,000 students, to open fall, 2011. Cost: $150-million to $200-million.

Waterfront Toronto hopes to name a private developer partner for the precinct later this year, depending on real estate market conditions.

Total cost: $667-million public sector contribution; $3-billion private sector investment

(10) West Don Lands

A 32-hectare site between the Don River and Parliament Street, south of King, to be developed as a new mixed-use, mixed-income residential neighbourhood.

Key elements:

Construction of a $130-million berm, about 75 per cent complete, to protect against Don River flooding;

$23-million development of 7.3 hectare Don River Park;

River City, a private sector development with 850 residential units;

Toronto Community Housing Corp. project for 250 units of affordable housing. No cost estimate yet. To be built out over the next 10-15 years, starting January, 2010, but faster if Toronto wins the 2015 Pan Am Games.

2010: Park construction starts, with completion by summer, 2011.

Total cost: $341-million public sector contribution; $2-billion private sector investment



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only cringe I have is with the Removal of the Gardiner @ 300 Million.
"A Univeristy style Blvd. (has anyone walked down university recently? there is not much going on.


Some interesting projects none the less.
 

Patriot

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I think the Queen's Quay street redevelopment will make a huge impact because it will showcase new trees, sidewalks, lighting, etc. Plus, this street is clearly visible for tourists.

Sugar beach and Sherbourne Park are wonderful, but less likely to be visited by tourists, until the rest of the area is redeveloped.
 

Tony

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Excellent, thanks for the list.

What ever happened to Commissioner's Park? I can't find any mention of it on the towaterfront.ca.
 

SimonP

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It is great to see that after several decades of inactivity that progress is being made in most of these areas.

The list also leaves off the Lower Don Lands Project, which is one of the biggest, though it is also a few years away from fruition.
 

EnviroTO

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Commissioners Park planning jumped the gun because an area plan for the area didn't exist yet. With the Lower Don Lands plan which naturalizes the river mouth the lands that Commissioners Park were on no longer exist. The new plan is to have a much larger park that follows the course of the new river and Villiers St (which runs through what would have been the park) will become Commissioners just west of Don Roadway.
 
G

gabe

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It's beautiful — but dangerous
Man plans lawsuit after WaveDeck injury

To some, like waterfront resident Paul Thomas, it's the leg-breaker at the foot of Simcoe St.

Thomas, 47, blames the steep incline of the $6-million Simcoe WaveDeck for the severe leg injury he suffered July 3 while attempting to navigate its sloping surfaces.

"I haven't been able to work at all," Thomas said. "It's just devastated my life."

His lawyer, Charles Gluckstein, notified City Hall he intends to file a lawsuit for the severed tendon and partially broken kneecap Thomas suffered after stepping down from the WaveDeck's west hump to the next-highest level.

Thomas views the WaveDeck as a beautiful vibrant addition to the downtown waterfront. But he also thinks it's dangerous.

MUNICIPAL STANDARDS

"I thought it was safe when I was on it, but I'm a prime example that it's not," Thomas said. "I just think that for them to spend so much on something so beautiful, you'd think they'd make it a little safer."

Safety advocates say the 650-square-metre wooden boardwalk, which has a 42% slope at the steepest part, should be closed until engineers make it safer.

"I think the Harbourfront is a great place to go. I just don't think the gateway to that facility should be this risky," Brian Patterson, president of the Ontario Safety League, said. "The city's engineers should move quickly to correct it."

The dramatic and unorthodox WaveDeck -- designed by Rotterdam firm West 8 -- is one of three unveiled in the past year by Waterfront Toronto, the agency revitalizing the downtown waterfront.

The agency spent $14 million on three completed decks along Queens Quay at Spadina Ave., Rees St. and Simcoe St. A fourth WaveDeck is slated for Parliament St.

Waterfront Toronto and city officials wouldn't comment about Thomas' pending suit but said the boardwalks abide by municipal planning standards. West 8 officials weren't available for comment.

Thomas, who owns a company that invents and markets board games, said he was hospitalized for two weeks after developing complications from his surgery.

Thomas said he was forced to live on credit cards and loans from friends while off work. Gluckstein said it hasn't been determined how much the claim will be but would likely seek damages for pain and suffering and lost wages.

"It's our view that this is a dangerous design and it's a safety hazard for the public," he said. "It's completely the cause of his injuries."
http://www.torontosun.com/news/torontoandgta/2009/09/04/10743356-sun.html
 

confusion

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It's cases like this where I hate the legal system.

* EDIT - Where I hate the people who are able to try to leverage the legal system to get ridiculous claims
 

AKS

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Could I sue the government if I trip on the rails at the wave deck and suffer trauma from nearly drowning to death? :p
 

lead82

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The city should counter sue this idiot for being just that. The blame for breaking his leg should fall fully on him! It is called being a responsible adult.
 

Pretzel

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I don’t think anyone put a gun to his head to make him walk on it!

It sounds to me either he was drunk or way out of shape to be navigating such a complex deck :rolleyes:
 

PukeGreen

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Huh. I seem to recall various articles and postings mocking the signs beside the first wavedeck that contain a laundry list of rules and disclaimers. The words "nanny state" were no doubt thrown around. But now we know why it is there. I hope the court tosses this out: the whole purpose of the "wave deck" is that it is "wavey" and therefore not flat. Any idiot can see before stepping on it that it has a "sloping surface".

Perhaps he should also sue God or the Flying Spaghetti Monster or whoever he blames for the creation of Earth because, you know, it has all those dangerous hills and valleys and stuff.
 

AKS

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I'm thinking maybe it might even be an attempt at money extortion. Like I saw in HK dramas where they run out in front of the car and to get hit and pretend it's hurting really badly so they can get the driver to pay for compensation.
 

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