Thirty Six Zorra Condominiums | 114m | 35s | Altree | Graziani + Corazza

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30 ZORRA ST
Ward 05 - Etob. York District

Proposed amendments to the Etobicoke Zoning Code to permit the development of a 36 storey residential apartment building containing 379 units and a total gross floor area of 28 170 m2.
Proposed Use --- # of Storeys --- # of Units ---
Applications:
Type Number Date Submitted Status
Rezoning 15 244093 WET 05 OZ Oct 28, 2015 Under Review
http://app.toronto.ca/DevelopmentApplications/associatedApplicationsList.do?action=init&folderRsn=3850168&isCofASearch=false
______________________________________________-

I thought this might be part of IQ Condos Phase 3.....
but its not, it happens to be on the other side of the street, just north of the Gardiner


IQ Phase-3 condo site................http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-72170.pdf
 

Lumber King

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didn't see a thread for this tower yet:

http://app.toronto.ca/DevelopmentApplications/associatedApplicationsList.do?action=init&folderRsn=3850168&isCofASearch=false


On behalf of our client, 1127792 Ontario Limited, we are pleased to submit revised materials in support of a Zoning By-law Amendment (ZBA) application for a proposed 35-storey residential building on the lands municipally known as 30 & 44 Zorra Street.


44 Zorra St..jpg

Another Building on Zorra st. this is going to be a traffic nightmare in this tight area. 9 towers proposed by my count between Zorra & St. Lawerance Ave.
 

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Amare

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Another Building on Zorra st. this is going to be a traffic nightmare in this tight area. 9 towers proposed by my count between Zorra & St. Lawerance Ave.
This is just the beginning trust me. Just wait until the Kipling-Queensway Mall is razed for redevelopment, and the other industrial sites between Kipling and Islington are re-zoned for residential.

In this city the mentality is build now, and think about the consequences later. The Queensway wont be able to handle the influx of cars, but tell that to the city and they'll tell you otherwise.
 

interchange42

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The mentality is not "think about consequences later". Every application is vetted by a slew of departments, and each one builds on all the others around it. Yes, there will be more traffic, but there will also be more transit riders, and for that, the frequency of buses by the site will increase, and maybe someday there will be a new bus route branching along Caven Street, or even an LRT on The Queensway (some years) after ridership warrants it.

The City can do little to stop high density redevelopment in areas that suit the requirements of the Province's Places To Grow Act. The City can still quibble over percentages when it comes to total FSI, height, etc., but most properties outside of stable neighbourhoods have inherent redevelopment potential, so the City has to play ball and make sure that the developments that go up are as well planned for each area as possible, because, like I said, they simply do not have the power to stop them from happening altogether.

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Amare

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They may not have the power to stop developments from sprouting up as you said interchange, but the city certainly has the ability to come up with a comprehensive plan for a neighborhood that would outline very clearly what they would expect to see out of any kind of proposal. The city has had numerous years to come up with a plan for the neighborhood, but as usual they are in reaction mode instead of being proactive. This is something that the city has failed on when it comes to The Queensway; there has been no plan of any kind set out for a substantial strip of land that is set to go through an incremental population boom (one of the largest that the city will see in the next 20 years).

We have seen time and time again what happens when the city fails to come up with any plan for a new neighborhood. Liberty Village, and Humber Bay Park are the two most recent examples that can be looked at.

While it is true that the frequency of buses will eventually increase, I doubt it will be able to match the population that it will eventually serve. The 80 Queensway has been a victim of numerous service cuts, and any time the word budget cuts is mentioned, that bus usually suffers from the effects of said cuts. If the TTC cant even implement additional service to serve the Humber Bay community, I wouldnt expect the to do much with Queensway.
 

interchange42

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When more people show up at bus stops, more buses eventually arrive. That happens all over the city, and it'll happen here. The Queensway bus has never been well patronized, partly because it doesn't have frequent service in the first place, and mostly because it takes a long time to get to a rapid transit station (Keele subway—and half the time the 80 turns around at the Humber Loop).

The Humber Loop should be the site of a rapid transit station, and if the criminally irresponsible planners at Metrolinx can pull their civic duty out of their asses in the next year and get a Park Lawn/Humber Loop station back into play, then both The Queensway and the Humber Bay Shores growth areas could soon enough have quick access to Downtown. There are supposed to be public consultations this Fall for the Park Lawn/Lake Shore Area Transportation Master Plan Study, a study which needs to find infrastructure solutions to the transit challenges in the area.

Until there's a better hub to send an eastbound Queensway bus to, most transit users on this particular stretch of The Queensway are going to opt to go north on the various bus routes that head to the Bloor Danforth line. In terms of more cars, other than how they can get in the way of buses, I don't care about them very much. The Kipling interchange will be improved, this area will get an east-west street (Caven), and people using cars to commute will get what they deserve: traffic jams. Luckily these days, most new condo dwellers are eschewing the parking space and the vehicle to put in one.

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Amare

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There are supposed to be public consultations this Fall for the Park Lawn/Lake Shore Area Transportation Master Plan Study, a study which needs to find infrastructure solutions to the transit challenges in the area.

Until there's a better hub to send an eastbound Queensway bus to, most transit users on this particular stretch of The Queensway are going to opt to go north on the various bus routes that head to the Bloor Danforth line. In terms of more cars, other than how they can get in the way of buses, I don't care about them very much. The Kipling interchange will be improved, this area will get an east-west street (Caven), and people using cars to commute will get what they deserve: traffic jams. Luckily these days, most new condo dwellers are eschewing the parking space and the vehicle to put in one.
Let's hope that Master Plan Study actually goes into use, and doesnt go into the pile of studies where nothing gets done.
Because if not, that stretch of The Queensway from Humber Bay to Kipling will be a zoo filled with a sea of cars.
 

argus

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Well, the developer usually submits a traffic plan that can be summed up as "everything will be okay."
 

interchange42

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