St Lawrence Condos at 158 Front | 91.44m | 26s | Cityzen | architectsAlliance

3Dementia

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Razz' shots has me stuck on "comment repeat" button. Just kinda love this east of core midrise mayhem.

Would like to copy and paste some of this in front of Shittyplace towers (have to move Fort York Blvd over part of the rail corridor of course). So many "what ifs"... too little (or too much) time.
 

DSC

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I will wave once you move in!
tenor.gif
 

Philar21

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So I have a question for those with more knowledge about condo construction.

At what stage do they usually start finishing the inside of the units (drywall, fixtures, finishing, etc).

Is this something they work on while new floors are being added or do they really only start finishing after they've built all the floors?

My motivation for asking is partly to understand how far along in construction we are. Based on where we're at now, is next spring still realistic for first wave of move-ins? Or are we now looking at Summer/Fall 2021 at the earliest.

Thanks in advance.
 

DSC

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So I have a question for those with more knowledge about condo construction.

At what stage do they usually start finishing the inside of the units (drywall, fixtures, finishing, etc).

Is this something they work on while new floors are being added or do they really only start finishing after they've built all the floors?

My motivation for asking is partly to understand how far along in construction we are. Based on where we're at now, is next spring still realistic for first wave of move-ins? Or are we now looking at Summer/Fall 2021 at the earliest.

Thanks in advance.
In the 'olden day' one saw the structure basically finished before they even added windows. Now they add windows fairly early on and certainly long before they finish building the upper floors. Once a Unit (or floor) is weather-proof they can do quite a lot of internal work without things freezing or getting flooded. There are many examples of people moving into lower floors of residential buildings even before the external hoists have been removed (and probably before the upper floors are fully formed) but the developer DOES need to obtain a City occupancy permit (granted only when fire alarms and elevators and +++ are functional.)

As for move-ins starting at this development ...... they have now reached the tower portions so they should be able to move more quickly as all floors are basically the same and they can re-use the forms so I would say it will be 'summer' 2021 but a lot will depend on how fast they can work with covid 'social distancing' restrictions and whether suppliers are able to supply 'stuff' as fast as they initially promised.
 

AHK

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So I have a question for those with more knowledge about condo construction.

At what stage do they usually start finishing the inside of the units (drywall, fixtures, finishing, etc).

Is this something they work on while new floors are being added or do they really only start finishing after they've built all the floors?

My motivation for asking is partly to understand how far along in construction we are. Based on where we're at now, is next spring still realistic for first wave of move-ins? Or are we now looking at Summer/Fall 2021 at the earliest.

Thanks in advance.

A few more details to elaborate on DSC's response - another factor to be considered is how tall, the number of floors there are in the building. The amount of overlap in construction stages could increase, the taller the building is. As the lower floors are enclosed, there may still be water seepage coming down to lower floors from the unenclosed floors above. The larger the number of floors, the more work that can be done on the lower floors, without the risk of rain water seepage reaching a unit being finished up. Normally, the electrical and mechanical rough-in and internal framing work would not be subject to water damage - which is a good thing, as these would be in the first stages on internal unit fit-up. Obviously, drywall, flooring, kitchen and bathroom cabinetry, etc. would be in the later stages - which is a good thing, as they would be the most subject to damage from any water penetration into the unit.

So - the taller the building, the more work that can be done on the lower floor units while maintaining a buffer number of floors that have already been enclosed, from the open floors above.

That is it for general principles - with respect to a 26 floor building - as a lay observer, I would think that units in the podium, which would be fully enclosed early in the process, as well as lower floor units in the towers themselves, could have a substantial amount of work completed before the top few floors, as well as the mechanical penthouse areas, are fully enclosed and waterproofed.
 

philip yates

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Those are some really helpful, pics, thanks for posting from those who are far away and don't have the opportunity to visit the future abode very often
 

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