St. Lawrence Condos at 158 Front | 91.44m | 26s | Cityzen | architectsAlliance

3Dementia

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The charcoal "panel brick" looks good and will enhance the east of Yonge mayhem of colour, styles, massing, materials etc. well documented in the pics above. Am not a hoarder, but there's sumptin' I love about the emerging clutter in the neighbourhood... at least from an aerial pov. Maybe because it doesn't look planned ;-)

BTW "panel brick" appeared maybe 40 years or so ago (slices of brick adhered to drywall or other) though sold typically as an interior product. Obviously the new panel brick (exterior cladding) is rather more robust. LOL.
 

DSC

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The charcoal "panel brick" looks good and will enhance the east of Yonge mayhem of colour, styles, massing, materials etc. well documented in the pics above. Am not a hoarder, but there's sumptin' I love about the emerging clutter in the neighbourhood... at least from an aerial pov. Maybe because it doesn't look planned ;-)

BTW "panel brick" appeared maybe 40 years or so ago (slices of brick adhered to drywall or other) though sold typically as an interior product. Obviously the new panel brick (exterior cladding) is rather more robust. LOL.
I admire your optimism and will be interested to see if it actually lasts (and still looks vaguely like 'real brick". I think the concept is far older and remember Insulbric
"Insul-Bric Siding (sometimes spelled Insul-Brick) was manufactured in Winnipeg by Building Products Limited, from the mid-1930s to the early 1960s. The touted benefits of the material was that it looked superficially like real brick, required no painting or other maintenance, and provided some insulation value to exterior building walls on which it was installed. It was durable and could last in some cases for over 60 years and was available in red, brown or grey colours with white or black “mortar” between bricks." SEE: http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/glossary/insulbric.shtml
 

interchange42

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I admire your optimism and will be interested to see if it actually lasts (and still looks vaguely like 'real brick". I think the concept is far older and remember Insulbric
"Insul-Bric Siding (sometimes spelled Insul-Brick) was manufactured in Winnipeg by Building Products Limited, from the mid-1930s to the early 1960s. The touted benefits of the material was that it looked superficially like real brick, required no painting or other maintenance, and provided some insulation value to exterior building walls on which it was installed. It was durable and could last in some cases for over 60 years and was available in red, brown or grey colours with white or black “mortar” between bricks." SEE: http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/glossary/insulbric.shtml
Well, we're dealing with real brick veneers embedded in concrete here, so this ain't no insulbrick!

42
 

Philar21

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This feels like it's moving at a glacial pace. I went back a couple pages to November 2 and looked at the pictures since then. We have literally added 3-4 floors in four months.

I do not see people moving in for Spring 2021 unless they seriously pick up the pace. Summer for Fall 2021 for the first batch of move ins seems more likely the way things are going.
 

Lachlan Holmes

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This feels like it's moving at a glacial pace. I went back a couple pages to November 2 and looked at the pictures since then. We have literally added 3-4 floors in four months.

I do not see people moving in for Spring 2021 unless they seriously pick up the pace. Summer for Fall 2021 for the first batch of move ins seems more likely the way things are going.
The pace sounds about right considering they're still on large podium floorplates, also, the winter weather does slow things down. Floor pours should speed up once they're on to the tower floorplates which are smaller and more standard.
 

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