Queens Quay & Water's Edge Revitalization | ?m | ?s | Waterfront Toronto

nfitz

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It's possible that their watering efforts weren't enough. But the European import isn't the best tree for our climate. If it were, we'd see more of them throughout the city.
Should have gone with classic Toronto street trees - like Norway Maples.
 

AlbertHWagstaff

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Should have gone with classic Toronto street trees - like Norway Maples.

Agreed, they can withstand just about anything but they're now the pariah of street trees, because they're "non-native" and "invasive", although I don't know how invasive they would really be in planters on Bloor West or Queens Quay. Sugar maples seem to be the closest substitute.
 

nfitz

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Agreed, they can withstand just about anything but they're now the pariah of street trees, because they're "non-native" and "invasive", although I don't know how invasive they would really be in planters on Bloor West or Queens Quay. Sugar maples seem to be the closest substitute.
Humans and worms are non-native and invasive as well. I don't know how we got mired in that bizarre anti-Norway Maple crap. We're in a city, not untouched wilderness. I'm certainly planting more of them on my property!
 

PinkLucy

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The were putting bike lane markings in today -- with white brick -- so they should be more permanent than paint. And they are huge!
 

achender

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A few shots from today.

New trees.
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New light standards.
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The bike lane traffic lights at Bay.
IMAG0434.jpg
 

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Tewder

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Are those new light standards a tribute to our beloved wooden hydro poles? Should make many happy here. I do wonder if they'll end up plastered in posters and staples though.
 

88drums

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Looking good, but I'm wary seeing roadside trees planted flush with the sidewalk like that. Even with Silva cells in place, heavy salting will be hard on them.

Many of the boardwalk trees planted in the last few years seem to be thriving, but roadside trees are particularly vulnerable in winter. Queen's Quay is poised to offer some much-needed respite from the cheap streetscaping and stunted, withered trees found through much of downtown, but only if we pay proper attention to growing conditions. I really believe that a solid urban canopy down here in summertime will be integral to this becoming one of Toronto's next great boulevards, as has been promised time and time again.
 

robmausser

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Are those new light standards a tribute to our beloved wooden hydro poles? Should make many happy here. I do wonder if they'll end up plastered in posters and staples though.

We need those street cleaner guys in their little mini sweeper cars to go around with huge neodymium magnets and suck all those staples out.

Then again, the older poles are probably being held up entirely by staples by now..

Toronto does seem to love using wood when other cities have moved on to steel and concrete, wooden ties for our subway and GO train tracks too.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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We need those street cleaner guys in their little mini sweeper cars to go around with huge neodymium magnets and suck all those staples out.

Then again, the older poles are probably being held up entirely by staples by now..

Toronto does seem to love using wood when other cities have moved on to steel and concrete, wooden ties for our subway and GO train tracks too.

It's on purpose in this case - West 8's idea of referencing of our heritage (and they will be sleeved, just like the ones along the lake)

http://www.landezine.com/index.php/...ront-waters-edge-promenade-by-west-8-dtah-02/

AoD
 

mjl08

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Are those new light standards a tribute to our beloved wooden hydro poles? Should make many happy here. I do wonder if they'll end up plastered in posters and staples though.
In fairness, those are gorgeous wooden poles. Will take only, what, two years before they become swarmed by rotting staples and thumb tacks? :p
 

Northern Light

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Humans and worms are non-native and invasive as well. I don't know how we got mired in that bizarre anti-Norway Maple crap. We're in a city, not untouched wilderness. I'm certainly planting more of them on my property!

Its not crap! You are insufferable at times.

Non-native trees provide very poor habitat/food for wildlife. Studies have repeatedly shown fewer birds nests, fewer insects, fewer pollinators make use of non-native trees. Want a healthy bee population? Or to see interesting birds in your backyard? Plant native trees.

Further, Norway Maples have spread into the valleys, and have caused a great deal of erosion as their dense canopies and root systems don't allow anything to grow underneath. Ever noticed when Norways are established on City Boulevards you often see the grass die?

They are a serious threat to a healthy population of Oaks, Beech and other native trees. (not by killing them, but out competing them and creating conditions under which the natives can not reproduce)

***

Native trees of all sorts will do well as street trees, given proper conditions. The best choices for adverse conditions are Honey Locust, and Silver Maple.

The variants of American Elm (that are dutch elm disease resistant) are also a good choice; and Red Oak is far more tolerant than its given credit for; though it should never be put in a tiny box!

Sugar Maple is shade tolerant........but not particularly good w/salt.

I would also consider Bur Oak and White Oak in better planting conditions.

We really should reduce salt-use....even using a brine, properly formulated can reduce the amount of salt applied.
 
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