Pinnacle One Yonge | 344.58m | 105s | Pinnacle | Hariri Pontarini

cc46

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2087 wow, didn't know that. Is it ever full?

Definetely parking needs a re-think.

Maybe my brain is stuck in old ratios.

What are the common ratios for parking for residential space? office space? stadium space etc these days?
 

innsertnamehere

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markham wants 4,000 spaces for its new arena, but that is in MARKHAM (next to no transit connections). I would expect much less to be necessary for the ACC, likely around 1500-2000. the Skydome, or, errrr...., the Rogers centre, will likely require around 4000. this is likely easily provided with the parking in the Rogers centre itself, the pinnacle centre, the new 400ish spot queens quay garage, the convention centre, the garage on simcoe directly south of the gardiner, and a 422 spot garage under the plaza directly to the west of the stadium.
 

canarob

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markham wants 4,000 spaces for its new arena, but that is in MARKHAM (next to no transit connections). I would expect much less to be necessary for the ACC, likely around 1500-2000. the Skydome, or, errrr...., the Rogers centre, will likely require around 4000. this is likely easily provided with the parking in the Rogers centre itself, the pinnacle centre, the new 400ish spot queens quay garage, the convention centre, the garage on simcoe directly south of the gardiner, and a 422 spot garage under the plaza directly to the west of the stadium.

There are 6,000 spots planned for the Markham arena, but you are being a unfair regarding the transit -- it'll be adjacent to Unionville GO station and the VIVA rapidway, which is as good as any transit connection in the 905, except for next to the subway in Vaughan.
 

innsertnamehere

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yes, but compared to downtown it is crap. trust me, I wish downtowm markham the best, but saying that it is extremely well connected by transit is heresay.
 

dt_toronto_geek

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2087 wow, didn't know that. Is it ever full?

I often use Bay Street as a route to cycle down to the lake and I've seen "lot full" signs on occasion. Visitors to the Sheraton Centre hotel most often use this lot too, plus it connects into the lower level of the Sheraton Centre.
 

fedplanner

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cc46

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must be a Leaf game to-night.

The lot at 1 Yonge is nearly full. And at least 7 cars waiting to get in. Two Just backed out and left.

I can see a few spots open near the snow.

At $15 or $20 each it's amoney maker.

Just saying.
 

bleu

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^ just saying what? that because the lot is making money on some nights, it probably should remain a parking lot right in downtown despite its huge potential? You are probably one of those who worry about loss of parking space for cars from the suburbs which come to downtown once in a while for entertaining? Apparently for those people, how Toronto is built and whether it is livable doesn't matter - as long as they have a parking spot when they take the kids here to play, maybe twice a month.

I think Toronto is fine with loss of the parking revenue, or the fact that the suburban dwellers from Vaughan or New Market come to downtown less due to lack of parking. Surface lots in downtown will disappear one after another (all being money makers), and everyone will just have to accept that. On the bright side, places like Brampton or Vaughan will always have ample parking, for free.
 

RC8

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Today there was a fire alarm in my building. I had to walk down 33 floors to begin my commute. You couldn't get back up even if you wanted to because stairs are inaccessible from outside or the ground floor, and elevators stopped working automatically.

In buildings this large, fire alarms happen fairly frequently. How would you like to walk your 70 year old grandfather down 50 sets of stairs in the event of a fire?

Have any of the people clamouring for residential supertalls ever lived for an extended period of time in a tall building? No one I know who has lived above 30 stories for a while would want to live any taller than that. Ever.
 

DavidJamesTO

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Put a garage underneath and make it available after hours. Few games are held during office hours, so it'll be printing free money for the property managers. Can probably fit more spaces, too.
 

Ramako

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Today there was a fire alarm in my building. I had to walk down 33 floors to begin my commute. You couldn't get back up even if you wanted to because stairs are inaccessible from outside or the ground floor, and elevators stopped working automatically.

In buildings this large, fire alarms happen fairly frequently. How would you like to walk your 70 year old grandfather down 50 sets of stairs in the event of a fire?

Have any of the people clamouring for residential supertalls ever lived for an extended period of time in a tall building? No one I know who has lived above 30 stories for a while would want to live any taller than that. Ever.

I lived on the 38th floor of a tower built in the '90s for a couple of years. Fire alarms were rare and I'd gladly live at that level again or higher.

Anecdotes for all!
 

Automation Gallery

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Today there was a fire alarm in my building. I had to walk down 33 floors to begin my commute. You couldn't get back up even if you wanted to because stairs are inaccessible from outside or the ground floor, and elevators stopped working automatically.

In buildings this large, fire alarms happen fairly frequently. How would you like to walk your 70 year old grandfather down 50 sets of stairs in the event of a fire?

Have any of the people clamouring for residential supertalls ever lived for an extended period of time in a tall building? No one I know who has lived above 30 stories for a while would want to live any taller than that. Ever.

Ohh please,...just someones version of saying they dont like tall buildings
 

RC8

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I lived on the 38th floor of a tower built in the '90s for a couple of years. Fire alarms were rare and I'd gladly live at that level again or higher.

Anecdotes for all!

I should rephrase. *Prefer instead of *want.

I actually really like where I live, and I too wouldn't mind living on a 50th story under the right circumstances, but I and my acquaintances who have lived in high rises for a long time, would strongly prefer living in a mid-rise or short high-rise given the choice. Especially if you have a family or are older and less physically capable yourself.
 

dt_toronto_geek

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Have any of the people clamouring for residential supertalls ever lived for an extended period of time in a tall building? No one I know who has lived above 30 stories for a while would want to live any taller than that. Ever.

My second apartment was also on the 38th floor (top residential floor) of the Plaza II apartments above the Bay at Yonge & Bloor. I evacuated once for a fire alarm in the first couple of months living there, never again. Walking down all those stairs (which are a maze of stairwells between the apartments, the hotel, then the Bay store) not only screwed my legs for a few days but also nearly killed me carrying my dog. Lots of fire alarms there too because so many parts of the east end of the complex are tied in together. Except in the event a catastrophic fire, building failure or an audio order to evacuate I'd never leave again, in most circumstances we are safe in the apartment. That said I have no problem living high up, I prefer it for the views of whatever is outside my windows. Most highrise buildings in Toronto post mid 1970's have emergency backup systems that keep the emergency power running and at least one elevator in the event of a power failure and building codes for fire are very good here.
 

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