Park Lawn GO Station | 12.83m | 2s | First Capital | Hatch

drum118

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Once people start living there, it becomes an "us" problem because residents will get upset that we need to tear up their plaza and cut down the trees in order to install a streetcar line which they will oppose on the basis of noise. It needs to be abundantly clear from day one that there will be a streetcar line running through there.
If you had look at the various plans from day one for a site plan, you will see there where streetcar tracks in both direction for the loop.

I stand to be corrected, TTC loop will be in phase 1 and no need to tear things out for it at a later date. The loop will open at the same time of the GO station or about, depending on the road system

501 will loop here in place of Humber loop that has been on TTC need list for a few decades, that was to go in on the south-west of Park Lawn. 501L will do the same thing as the 501.

The Lake Shore will be widen to allow for an TTC ROW from Humber Loop to Legion Rd. Both the Lake Shore ROW and the Loop should have grass in place of concrete
 

reaperexpress

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If you had look at the various plans from day one for a site plan, you will see there where streetcar tracks in both direction for the loop.
I DID look at the various plans, and I did see the tracks in them. What I am not seeing is a clear space allocation for them in the current landscape plan.

I stand to be corrected, TTC loop will be in phase 1 and no need to tear things out for it at a later date. The loop will open at the same time of the GO station or about, depending on the road system
Then why are they planting trees in the way of the tracks?
 

drum118

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I DID look at the various plans, and I did see the tracks in them. What I am not seeing is a clear space allocation for them in the current landscape plan.


Then why are they planting trees in the way of the tracks?
What trees as they haven't started to work on the site yet?? As far as I know, site plan still not approve.
 

drum118

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I am talking about the trees in the proposed site plan. I never said anything about work starting on the site.
You are jumping the gun and reading something the wrong way. Until everything is approve, only then you will have a clear view as to what is taking place as well when.

I am going by what was said at various meetings related to transit planning for the area and not looking a renderings nor preliminarily plans as they will change over time until approve. Even then, things get change for various reason along the way. We are a number of years out before things are set in stone.
 

nfitz

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You are jumping the gun and reading something the wrong way. Until everything is approve, only then you will have a clear view as to what is taking place as well when.
If one speaks out in 40 years, when the trees are too big to cut down it will be too late.

Surely commenting about the plans now - which do bizarrely show the tracks and trees in the same place is best.

It seems unlikely to me - but is there any chance these are existing trees?
 

drum118

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If one speaks out in 40 years, when the trees are too big to cut down it will be too late.

Surely commenting about the plans now - which do bizarrely show the tracks and trees in the same place is best.

It seems unlikely to me - but is there any chance these are existing trees?
I could be wrong, but all the trees where cut down a few years ago. Not that hard to remove 40 year old trees. You do a cut here, there starting at the top and work your way down to the ground and then dig up the rest. That what they did for trees older than 40 years this year on Hurontario. Only took a few hours to do it.

I haven't looked at the site plan in sometime nor looked close at landscaping plans to see where the tracks are as well the trees. Very rare I look at landscaping drawings.

If people have concerns over the location of tracks and trees, best to contract the City Planner who looking after this project as well TTC, Metrolinx and the developer. It no good complaining about it here as we have no power to make changes to do so.

This is a plan in the making with nothing set in stone in most cases using about 30% design stage.

As far as I know, Phase 1 will see the loop road, the new road under the rail corridor, the GO station and a number of buildings by the station as will the rebuilding of the Lake Shore for the ROW.
 

reaperexpress

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Not that hard to remove 40 year old trees. You do a cut here, there starting at the top and work your way down to the ground and then dig up the rest. That what they did for trees older than 40 years this year on Hurontario. Only took a few hours to do it.

I haven't looked at the site plan in sometime nor looked close at landscaping plans to see where the tracks are as well the trees. Very rare I look at landscaping drawings.
Clearly you haven't tried implementing transit projects which involved cutting down trees. It's not as simple as going out with a chainsaw, because you first need to get approval to do so. I have worked on fully funded transit priority projects which have been cancelled simply because the City would not approve the removal of trees. And it doesn't need to be 40 year old trees either. In one case, the design needed to be changed, doubling the construction cost, to save a couple trees which had only just been planted within the previous two years.
If people have concerns over the location of tracks and trees, best to contract the City Planner who looking after this project as well TTC, Metrolinx and the developer. It no good complaining about it here as we have no power to make changes to do so.

This is a plan in the making with nothing set in stone in most cases using about 30% design stage.
Yeah I know. It used to be part of my job to review Toronto development applications with respect to transportation infrastructure. I hate to be cynical, but if they dismissed my attempts to protect for already-planned transit infrastructure when I was an official being paid to review the landscape design, they certainly aren't going to listen to me when I'm a random guy who doesn't even live in Canada let alone in the immediate area.

I brought up the fact that the developer proposed trees directly in conflict with the streetcar line to point out to you guys that the developer isn't actually interested in building the streetcar tracks they are showing on their site plan. The tracks may just be proposed in order to get approval for their condos.

I did not bring it up expecting the issue to be solved by the UrbanToronto forum. If I wanted to actually get involved in the project, I would have contacted the person who currently has my old job.
 
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afransen

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Not only avoiding the controversy of cutting down trees later, but if they are located in a place that does not conflict with the future streetcar tracks then the community can continue to enjoy the trees that will be planted after the streetcar tracks are added, rather than having to replace them at a later date.
 

junctionist

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Trees make urban environments a lot more pleasant from a psychological perspective and help with air quality. They have a calming effect on people. The wealthiest neighbourhoods tend to have a lot of healthy trees. But it's hard to get enough space so that they can grow healthily in dense urban environments.

It's hard to get the right conditions where they're not getting killed by sidewalk salt, dog pee, locked bikes, soil trampling, or by not getting enough water. How many trees like this one do you see along the typical commercial/mixed use street in downtown Toronto?

Too many people think that growing a tree is as easy as planting a stick in a park or a large front yard in the suburbs and waiting for a few years. That isn't how it works in dense city neighbourhoods. Infrastructure has to be carefully planned with the long-term viability of street trees in mind, or we'll never get the benefits of maturing trees.

They'll keep dying because the conditions won't be right, because they'll keep getting cut down for new projects, or because their growth will end up stunted by poor conditions. Urban infrastructure should be planned with the long-term viability of street trees in mind.
 
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W. K. Lis

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Trees make urban environments a lot more pleasant from a psychological perspective and help with air quality. They have a calming effect on people. The wealthiest neighbourhoods tend to have a lot of healthy trees. But it's hard to get enough space so that they can grow healthily in dense urban environments.

It's hard to get the right conditions where they're not getting killed by sidewalk salt, dog pee, locked bikes, soil trampling, or by not getting enough water. How many trees like this one do you see along the typical commercial/mixed use street in downtown Toronto?

Too many people think that growing a tree is as easy as planting a stick in a park or a large front yard in the suburbs and waiting for a few years. That isn't how it works in dense city neighbourhoods. Infrastructure has to be carefully planned with the long-term viability of street trees in mind, or we'll never get the benefits of maturing trees.

They'll keep dying because the conditions won't be right, because they keep getting cut down for new projects, or because their growth ends up stunted by poor conditions. Urban infrastructure should be planned with the long-term viability of street trees in mind.
We also have a Transportation Department (roads, traffic signals, etc.) that has a aversion to anything green. When The Queensway streetcar right-of-way was "upgraded", they refused to put in grass between the tracks and refused to give REAL transit priority at the intersections (hence the go slow order through the Queensway traffic signals).
 

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