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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design) | ?m | ?s

urbancog

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whats the context of this?
IO/MX only shortlisted 3 from the RFQ.
are they saying 6 teams sent in an RFQ with 3 being shortlisted?
I tried to capture things Matt Clark stated in his presentation at Metrolinx board meeting. If this seems off, we'll have to wait for the meeting video to posted to see what he actually said.
 

generalcanada

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I tried to capture things Matt Clark stated in his presentation at Metrolinx board meeting. If this seems off, we'll have to wait for the meeting video to posted to see what he actually said.
well....i guess its noteworthy. he did say all 6 bids were sent in sucessfully.
 

hawc

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irishboy

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Apologies if this has already been discussed but I didn't see anything on the recent pages so figured I would ask. I am curious how the Ontario Line construction process will compare to The Crosstown.

They are both relatively similar length in length (CT is 19km/25 stations while OL is 16km/15 stations); they both have some portions tunneled and some at, or above, grade sections; and the OL is using smaller trains.

Unfortunately the Crosstown construction was long (10+ years) and very painful for people/businesses along the line. Basically the entire section of Eglington was ripped up for what seemed a decade...and was particularly bad at the major section of Yonge and Eg.

Of course, I know any subway project is going to be disruptive and likely take longer than expected...but just curious if you guys think this one will be as disruptive as CT was?

I am particularly curious about the tunneled sections of downtown. Since they seem to be going under buildings (i could be wrong here though) I wondered if the only real big construction zones would be the station areas build outs? I am hoping, perhaps naively, that the smaller tunnels and different technologies would enable the OL construction experience to be quicker/less disruptive than CT.

Thanks.
 

innsertnamehere

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Apologies if this has already been discussed but I didn't see anything on the recent pages so figured I would ask. I am curious how the Ontario Line construction process will compare to The Crosstown.

They are both relatively similar length in length (CT is 19km/25 stations while OL is 16km/15 stations); they both have some portions tunneled and some at, or above, grade sections; and the OL is using smaller trains.

Unfortunately the Crosstown construction was long (10+ years) and very painful for people/businesses along the line. Basically the entire section of Eglington was ripped up for what seemed a decade...and was particularly bad at the major section of Yonge and Eg.

Of course, I know any subway project is going to be disruptive and likely take longer than expected...but just curious if you guys think this one will be as disruptive as CT was?

I am particularly curious about the tunneled sections of downtown. Since they seem to be going under buildings (i could be wrong here though) I wondered if the only real big construction zones would be the station areas build outs? I am hoping, perhaps naively, that the smaller tunnels and different technologies would enable the OL construction experience to be quicker/less disruptive than CT.

Thanks.
One big design change Metrolinx has made with the OL is try to put the stations outside of the street right of way where possible, which should reduce disruption substantially. A few exceptions are unfortunately required it to be in the street right of way, particularly Queen and Yonge. That intersection is going to be completely closed for a minimum of 4 years.

Generally it's going to be a mess for 6-7 years at a minimum, but the pain is going to be spread out across multiple areas and not all along one street, so hopefully it won't be as disruptive overall. Traffic in the financial core itself is going to be problematic though with the 501 detouring onto Richmond and Adelaide and Queen being closed. The 501 will likely be completely useless between Jarvis and University during that, it will be faster to get off and walk most likely.

Many of the stations, including Moss Park, Corktown, Exhibition, Pape, Cosburn, etc. are all located off the street right of way and hopefully won't result in huge traffic snarls for years on end.
 

nfitz

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One big design change Metrolinx has made with the OL is try to put the stations outside of the street right of way where possible, which should reduce disruption substantially. A few exceptions are unfortunately required it to be in the street right of way, particularly Queen and Yonge. That intersection is going to be completely closed for a minimum of 4 years.
Another change is that the tunnel and stations are part of the same contract. With Crosstown they finished the tunnelling, pulled out the TBMs at Yonge and Eglinton, before any of the station work started (possibly even tendered).

Queen through Yonge is going to be a disaster though. That they are building a streetcar detour that will be used for years says a lot.
 

toronto647

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Apologies if this has already been discussed but I didn't see anything on the recent pages so figured I would ask. I am curious how the Ontario Line construction process will compare to The Crosstown.

They are both relatively similar length in length (CT is 19km/25 stations while OL is 16km/15 stations); they both have some portions tunneled and some at, or above, grade sections; and the OL is using smaller trains.

Unfortunately the Crosstown construction was long (10+ years) and very painful for people/businesses along the line. Basically the entire section of Eglington was ripped up for what seemed a decade...and was particularly bad at the major section of Yonge and Eg.

Of course, I know any subway project is going to be disruptive and likely take longer than expected...but just curious if you guys think this one will be as disruptive as CT was?

I am particularly curious about the tunneled sections of downtown. Since they seem to be going under buildings (i could be wrong here though) I wondered if the only real big construction zones would be the station areas build outs? I am hoping, perhaps naively, that the smaller tunnels and different technologies would enable the OL construction experience to be quicker/less disruptive than CT.

Thanks.
We still haven't seen the RFQ or RFP for the northern sections however it would be safe to say the elevated portions won't have major impact as the Southern section. Important to keep that in mind as a lot of this focus to date is on the south civils as this the only information Metrolinx has provided to City Hall regarding closures / traffic diversions etc... Northern section is expected to come next year when we will get a better idea of the impacts north of Danforth.
 

nfitz

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We still haven't seen the RFQ or RFP for the northern sections however it would be safe to say the elevated portions won't have major impact as the Southern section. Important to keep that in mind as a lot of this focus to date is on the south civils as this the only information Metrolinx has provided to City Hall regarding closures / traffic diversions etc... Northern section is expected to come next year when we will get a better idea of the impacts north of Danforth.
We do know though, that the northern TBM run will only be 3 km, and the launch/retrieval/portal sites won't be intrusive, as one is on the Pape dead-end, between Riverdale and the tracks (and under No Thrills) and the other will be well north of O'Connor, right on the edge of the escarpment, under Minton Place.

And we know that the station box for Pape station lines up with Muriel Avenue, rather than Pape, and doesn't extend far enough south to require a complete closure of Danforth (or any restrictions on Pape). All that leaves is Cosburn station, and the latest plan is to have the station box, not under Pape itself, but under the row of stores from Gamble to Gowan.

So that's all very minimal disruptions compared to Eglinton.

I doubt there'll be any issues with the above-ground section or the three stations there. The station on Overlea is all north of the roadway. The station nearest the Science Centre is all in the Science Centre parking lot. And the final station at Eglinton, is to the north of Eglinton and east of Don Mills Road, on parking lots, and the existing Line 5 station.

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